image-sense-project-7a89215e

Emerging interest in gender and sexual diversity in vocational training

There is a recent interest in the role of gender and sexual diversity in vocational education and training. After a steadily growing interest in LGBTIQ+ equality and marketing in the last 20 years, in the last decade a number of projects started to explore how vocational education and training could integrate attention to gender and sexual diversity. This development started with a series of projects in the Netherlands, which then expanded to the European level. This year, another project starts to experiment in some less welcoming countries, like Poland, Croatia, Cyprus and Greece.

Greater Percentage of Americans Self-Identify as LGBTQ OutBuro professionals entrepreneurs gay lesbian bisexual transgender queer community

Greater Percentage of Americans Self-Identify as LGBTQ

In the 2021 LGBTQ-focused Gallop poll survey released in February, Americans who self-identify as LGBTQ have risen to an average of 5.6% compared to the last survey in 2017 where that number was 4.5%.

The interesting point in the 2021 LGBTQ-focused Gallop poll is that 7.6% of respondents chose to not answer the question of how they self-identify meaning they wouldn’t even say they are heterosexual. So, 5.6% self-identify as LGBTQ and for 7.6% it is unknown. I have never known a heterosexual not comfortable with stating that. So, I personally believe a good portion of that 7.6% are LGBTQ or questioning. So the statistical number is somewhere between 5.6% and 13.2% (5.6 + 7.6). If I were to bet, the real number is in the 10-11% area.

Of the self-identifying LGBTQ the numbers look like this:

  •  54.6% bisexual
  • 24.5% gay
  • 11.7% lesbian
  • 11.3% transgender
  • 3.3% another non-heterosexual preference

Respondents can give multiple responses when describing their sexual identity; thus, the totals exceed 100%.

Rebasing these percentages to represent their share of the U.S. adult population finds 3.1% of Americans identifying as bisexual, 1.4% as gay, 0.7% as lesbian and 0.6% as transgender.

Gen Z More Comfortable Identifying as LGBTQ

Due to progress made in society, today Gen Z are much more comfortable in being their authentic self identifying as LGBTQ. In this recent Gallop poll for those aged 18-23 about one in six (15.9%) identified as something other than heterosexual.

One of the main reasons LGBT identification has been increasing over time is that younger generations are far more likely to consider themselves to be something other than heterosexual. This includes about one in six adult members of Generation Z (those aged 18 to 23 in 2020).

LGBT identification is lower in each older generation, including 2% or less of Americans born before 1965 (aged 56 and older in 2020).

Americans’ Self-Identification as LGBT, by Generation

LGBTHeterosexualNo opinion
%%%
Generation Z (born 1997-2002)15.978.95.2
Millennials (born 1981-1996)9.182.78.1
Generation X (born 1965-1980)3.888.67.6
Baby boomers (born 1946-1964)2.091.16.9
Traditionalists (born before 1946)1.389.98.9
GALLUP, 2020

Currently, Generation Z leans heavily on the bisexual side of LGBT. This means that nearly 12% of all Gen Z adults identify as bisexual. For comparison’s sake, about half of millennials who identify as LGBT say they’re bisexual. Also, another study completed in early 2019 found that 29% of Americans from 18-30 years old who identify as heterosexual occasionally have same-gender experiences which is called “heteroflexible“.

The most interesting part of these numbers may be that they could very easily be much higher. The survey was only able to gather info from the oldest segment of Generation Z, aged 18 to 23, so pollsters are expecting the percentages to continue to rise as time goes on and people feel more comfortable to live their truth.

According to the survey, more than half of LGBT adults (54.6%) identify as bisexual. About a quarter (24.5%) say they are gay, with 11.7% identifying as lesbian and 11.3% as transgender. An additional 3.3% offered another non-heterosexual preference or term to describe their sexual orientation, such as “queer.”

Americans’ Self-Identified Sexual Orientation, by Generation

BisexualGayLesbianTransgenderOther
%%%%%
Generation Z (born 1997-2002)11.52.11.41.80.4
Millennials (born 1981-1996)5.12.00.81.20.4
Generation X (born 1965-1980)1.81.20.70.20.1
Baby boomers (born 1946-1964)0.31.20.40.20.0
Traditionalists (born before 1946)0.30.30.20.30.1
Figures represent the percentage of all adult members of each generation who have that sexual orientation
GALLUP, 2020

The pronounced generational differences raise questions about whether higher LGBT identification in younger than older Americans reflects a true shift in sexual orientation, or if it merely reflects a greater willingness of younger people to identify as LGBT. 

Alfred Verhoeven Marketing the Rainbow corporate lgbtq advertising commercial ads compiled and reviewed lgbt profrssionals networking community OutBuro entrepreneurs gay

Alfred Verhoeven: Marketing the Rainbow – Corporate LGBTQ Advertising

In this episode of OutBüro Voices featuring LGBTQ professionals, entrepreneurs, and community leaders from around the world, host Dennis Velco chats with Alfred Verhoeven, marketing consultant and Marketing Ph.D. candidate.    

OutBuro on Apple Podcasts - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on Spotify - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on Stitcher - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews

OutBuro Voices on iHeartRadio Interviews Conversations with LGBTQ professionals entrepreneur startup community leaders gay lesbian business owners journey 75
OutBuro on Google Podcasts - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews

OutBuro on Pocket Casts- LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on TuneIn - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on Breaker Podcasts - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on Castbox Podcasts - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on Radio Public - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on Player-fm - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Review
OutBuro on Podbean - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Review
OutBuro on Overcast - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on happiTV - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Review
OutBuro Voices on YouTube - LGBT professionals glbt entrepreneurs gay business startup lesbian leaders community interviews

We’d love your text comments at the bottom of each show episode page asking questions of me, our guests, and interacting with other commenters.

We also have the feature where you may “call-in” and leave a recorded message. Your recorded message may be used in future episodes and requires a simple registration on the podcast platform

01:15 Brief intro by Alfred 

02:30 Alfred’s background includes a law degree and initially stubbled into marketing and has worked in corporate financial institutions yet has been in private practice for around 20 years so far. 

04:20 In the military, Alfred was a language specialist where he learned Russian working in the military intelligence realm.   

06:00 We discuss how both sales and marketing are areas where training helps to hone natural skills and abilities 08:00 Dennis shares a common connection via language learning, military intelligence, and a related story 

15:00 How to lose someone following you using 3 modes of transportation 

17:00 Alfred shares his inspiration to work on a Marketing Ph.D. and its focus titled Marketing the Rainbow – No one has done this study before 

19:00 How the stereotype of high wealth, disposal income, dual income no kids come from and how the original niche study has been incorrectly used and referenced.  See interview with Todd Evans of Rivendale Media.  https://outburo.com/spanning-95-of-lgbtq-print-online-media-rivendell/ 

26:00 Alfred discusses how and how the LGBTQ community became a focus for corporate marketing 

27:45 How LGBTQ persons often become caregivers due to often not having kids 

30:00 Alfred’s research is large and still growing but has focused the Ph.D. thesis to be manageable while providing the larger set of research articles through his website. https://marketingtherainbow.info/ 

31:00 Alfred discusses how companies stand for equality and how being inclusivity supports corporate profitability. 

34:50 The dangers of right-wing backlash and how it can turn around and benefit the company and has changed over time through social and legal advances 

36:00 How LGBTQ inclusive marketing is now pretty much mainstream and companies are pretty much foolish to not adopt inclusive marketing 

39:00 We chat about the evolution of LGBTQ equality acceptance. 

44:00 Alfred is taking the research content and creating articles outlining a company’s LGBTQ marketing history and journey.  See the website and YouTube channel listed below.   

51:00 We chat about past marketing mistakes and learning from them. 

To connect with Alfred find him on OutBüro here. https://outburo.com/profile/tawv/ 

Website: https://marketingtherainbow.info/

Check out his YouTube channel featuring LGBTQ marketing commercials.  

YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/AlfredVerhoeven 

Join me and Alfred on OutBüro, the LGBTQ professional and entrepreneur online community network for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, allies, and our employers who support LGBTQ welcoming workplace equality-focused benefits, policies, and business practices.  https://www.OutBuro.com 

Would you like to be featured like this? Contact the host Dennis Velco.  https://outburo.com/profile/dennisvelco/

Study Explores LGBTQ Employees Experiences OutBuro professional online networking community gay lesbian bisexual transgender queer intersex asexual pansexual entrepreneurs

Study Explores LGBT+ Employees Experiences

New research (Feb 2021) from the CIPD has confirmed that LGBT+ employees experience higher level of work-based conflict, and almost one in five transgender workers feel psychologically unsafe at work.

The CIPD’s recent report, Inclusion at work: perspectives on LGBT+ working lives confirms that while workplace inclusivity is fundamental to good, fair work and positive employee outcomes, many organisations have been slow to make headway to support their LGBT+ workforces.

Unfortunately, LGBT+ employees are more likely to experience workplace conflict and harassment than their heterosexual, cisgender counterparts. In particular, 40% of LGB+ workers and 55% of transgender workers have experienced workplace conflict in the last 12 months, compared with 29% of heterosexual, cisgender employees. When conflicts occurred, many reported that their issues hadn’t been fully resolved. Close to half (44%) of LGB+ workers who had experienced being undermined or humiliated said this had not been resolved, and almost four in ten said this had only been partly resolved (38%). Close to a quarter (23%) of transgender workers said they had experienced discrimination because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. Additionally, 16% of LGB+ workers feel psychologically unsafe in the workplace compared with heterosexual workers (10%). For transgender workers, this figure is even higher at 18%.

All of this suggests that employers’ handling of conflict and harassment towards LGBT+ workers must improve. It is further clear that employers need to develop a greater understanding of the specific experiences – and needs – of their LGBT+ workforce.

All of this news is obviously disappointing to hear, and disappointing to hear while we remain in a pandemic, where the majority of workers remain working from home, many of whom feel lonely and isolated – particularly those within the LGBT+ community.

The current status quo therefore must change, not just for the LGBT+ community but for all. There is no more an important time to do this as we seek to recover and thrive after the pandemic. Recommendations for all in this area therefore include the following:

  • Reviewing and ensuring that anti-discrimination policies and practices are fit for purpose, well understood, and carried out throughout the organisation. These should set clear expectations of what is and is not acceptable behavior, with practical examples, and provide robust guidance to managers on how to report and deal with incidences of conflict. A zero-tolerance approach to discrimination is fundamental for all employers regardless of size. Employers have legal obligations to prevent and address discrimination and should take a zero-tolerance approach to this.
  • Create visible leadership in this area, supportive and knowledgeable about the difficulties that LGBT+ workers may face at work. Reciprocal mentoring is encouraged, to enable both groups to learn from each other. Gaining true buy-in and support from senior leadership is vital for building more inclusive workplaces.
  • Provide training to enable the entire workforce to recognize where conflict exists or may exist and the value of equal opportunity, diversity, and inclusion. Understanding people’s differences, why they are important, and why they should be protected is key and will enable the creation of positive and inclusive work relationships.
  • Encourage the reporting of any and all forms of conflict and ensure that all such matters are properly and seriously investigated.
  • Offer support through the use of LGBT+, and allyship, networks. These can be used for LGBT+ workers to discuss difficult matters with other like-minded people. Appropriate training is of course necessary here, particularly for signposting purposes as network members should not act as counselors or dispute resolution experts. Such networks also allow LGBT+ workers to collectively raise important issues and suggestions to improve inclusion and diversity within the organization.
  • Leverage OutBüro’s (www.OutBuro.com) LGBTQ Employer Branding platform to share your organization’s strides and process with current and prospective employees. Utilize its employee reviews to create an open dialog while demonstrating your organization takes their feedback seriously and is striving to be a welcoming workplace where all are respected equally.

Employers are therefore encouraged, off the back of the CIPD’s report, and as prompted by LGBT History Month, to improve their understanding of challenges faced by their LGBT+ workforce, to combat all possible opportunities for conflict or prejudice in this area, and thereafter to celebrate their diverse and inclusive workforces. The fight for LGBT+ rights and equal opportunity is clearly not over yet; we all have an important role to play to ensure that everyone is treated equally and fairly.

Gender Idendity Gender Expression learning discovery teaching aid mode - OutBuro lgbtq professional networking community rate employer ratings company reviews entrepreneurs

Understanding Gender Identity and Expression 101

Understanding gender identity and expression to support education in LGBTQ corporate equality for a welcoming workplace. In Feb 2021 we updated our model to include scales for “other” in our own continued learning evolution and striving to provide content and resources that are reflective of you and all your beautiful complexities. We hope this now is fully inclusive and we remain open to constructive feedback.

Most people when they hear – LGBTQ – they think of it is a group of individuals who are attracted to members of the same sex to some degree. Interestingly, most don’t realize that the “T” does not directly relate to a person’s sexual attraction at all. It is separate and refers to a person’s sense of gender. Inside, do they feel like a male or female or even somewhere in between the two. This is referred to as gender identity.

Before the 19th century, the terms gender and sex were interchangeable. It was believed was what you physically appeared as at birth was cut and dry. Binary. Female or male from birth in body, mind, and soul.

Around 1925, a sexologist named Magnus Hirschfeld from Germany published an article. In it, he described for the first time the difference between the sexual desire for persons of the same gender compared to a deep desire to live and/or dress as the opposite gender because it matches how you feel and view yourself.

In the 1950s the concepts and theories about gender, gender roles, and gender identity were introduced and defined in the psychological literature. Psychologists, such as Jerome Kagan and John Money, initially believed that gender identity was simply a degree a person felt feminine or masculine coupled with the ability to live openly and freely as who they are supporting a secure sense of self.

From around 1965 through 1985 researchers such as Sandra Bem, Richard Green, Harry Benjamin, and, Robert Stoller furthered the understanding of gender and gender identity. Green, Benjamin, and Stoller pioneered gender identity clinics, as well as gender-related medical and surgical treatments.

The ongoing work of these and other pioneer researchers in the field of gender identity development raised awareness that gender is not exclusively determined by assigned sex at birth but determined by a person’s sense, belief, and the ultimate expression of self.

A bit more to understand

The term transgender is an overall term for people whose gender identity, expression and/or behavior is different from those typically associated with their assigned sex at birth. Since the 1990s, transgender has also been used to describe:

  • transsexuals
  • crossdressers
  • androgynous people
  • genderqueers
  • gender non-conforming people

Transgender men had or have female body parts; however, they may identify and/or express themselves as male. Female to male or F2M.

Transgender women had or have male body parts; however, they may identify and/or express themselves as female. Male to female or M2F.

Research shows that gender identity, in many cases, is independent of sexual orientation.

  • Androphilic are people that were born with a male body, have a female gender identity, and are attracted to men. My understanding is like this:
    • M2F Straight
    • F2M Straight.
  • Gynephilia is people that were born with a male body, have a female gender and are attracted to women. My understanding is like this:
    • M2F Lesbian
    • F2M Gay
  • Cis-Gender, is a person who feels that how they mentally identify matches their physical body.
    • Cis-male
    • Cis-female

See: List of LGBTQ+ terms with definitions

Marketors, employers, prevention specialists, and healthcare providers should be aware that beliefs impact almost all areas of a person’s life, their feeling of accepted and being welcomed.

Think about not only your own beliefs and attitudes but how can you impact your place of business, your working environment, policies, benefits. How can you make your company, business, institution more accessible and in some cases safe?

If in my attempts to simplify for the sake of understanding a very complex field I’m happy to be constructively corrected and happy to edit the content if necessary. Please add your comments below.

I’ve already written about the Surrey University study demonstrating a clear bias against persons who are perceived as LGBT in the hiring process, promotions, and salary. Added to the stress of work anyone faces, adds being verbally harassed or worse not just at work but everywhere.

At this point, it’s – Duh!. In order to understand you have to get to know.

If you work for a company if not already happening, suggest or start social gatherings to get to know others out of the work environment. Maybe host a company talent show or other activities that foster interaction embracing the differences. The biggest is connect with others and be open and willing to give everyone an opportunity to shine. Listen carefully. Do you have interests in common? Do you hear an opportunity to partner on a project to help each other and maybe others in the company or community?

OutBüro’s Gender Identity and Expression Model

The concept of gender identity and expression graphic to help explain the concepts is not new. Hower, OutBüro decided to create our own with some modifications to past models to help further clarify the concepts.

Most models to date have a scale with feminine on one end of a spectrum and masculine on the opposite. We believe that having them separately represented is more accurate was of thinking and helps to better understand.

Meet Chris – the OutBüro Gender Identity and Expression Model

In the diagram below consider the lines noting masculine, feminine, and other as each independent sliding scales from 0 to 100%. If using this as a worksheet, consider marking each scale with a pencil where you feel you are on each scale. Either right-click to download as a JPG file or click here to download a PDF version.

Gender Idendity Gender Expression learning discovery teaching aid mode - OutBuro lgbtq professional networking community rate employer ratings company reviews entrepreneurs

Gender Identity

Gender Identity is how you, in your head, experience and define your gender, based on how much you align (or don’t align) with what you understand the options for gender to be. Common associations: personality traits, jobs, hobbies, likes, dislikes, roles, expectations

Gender Expression

Gender Expression is how you present gender (through your actions, clothing, and demeanor, to name a few), and how those presentations are viewed based on social expectations. Common associations: style, grooming, clothing, mannerisms, affect, appearance, hair, make-up

Anatomical Sex

Anatomical Sex is the physical traits you’re born with or develop that we think of as “sex characteristics,” as well as the sex you are assigned at birth. Common associations: body hair, chest, hips, shoulders, hormones penis, vulva, chromosomes, voice pitch

Attraction

Attraction is how you find yourself feeling drawn (or not drawn) to some other people, in sexual, romantic, and/or other ways (often categorized within gender).

What does LGBTQ mean OutBuro professional online networking community gay lesbian bisexual transgender queer intersex asexual pansexual entrepreneurs

What does LGBTQ mean?

Have you stumbled on these letters or heard someone use them and not quite sure about its meaning? LGBTQ stands for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer.

You may also see LGBTQ+, many feel Queer is an umbrella all-inclusive all-encompassing term. Other Don,t and will add the “+” symbol to represent the full spectrum of the community.

On social media, in marketing, in texting, and generally anywhere you may see other variations. Basically here is what each letter represents and for definitions and a broader list check out our List of LGBTQ+ terms with definitions.

  • L = Lesbian
  • G = Gay and/or Genderqueer. Sometimes two G’s are presented
  • B = Bisexual
  • T = Transgender
  • Q = Queer and/or questioning sometimes a second Q is provided
  • I = Intersex
  • A = Asexual
  • P = Pansexual and/or Polygamous
  • A = a second A is for Allies and/or Aromantic. Sometimes all three A’s will be present
  • K = Kink

Here are some variations you may see:

  • LGBTQI
  • LGBTIQ
  • LGBTQAI
  • LGBTQAI+
  • LGBTI
  • GLBT
  • LGBTQIAP
  • LGBTQIAPK
  • LGGBTQQIAAAPPK

Check out these additional guides:

Romy Newman Fairygodboss co-founder social entrepreneur women professional networking community rate employer ratings compay reviews corporate transparency

Romy Newman: Social Entrepreneur – Empowering Careers of Women

In this episode of OutBüro Voices featuring LGBTQ professionals, entrepreneurs, and community leaders from around the world, host Dennis Velco chats with Romy Newman a social entrepreneur with a focus on advancing workplace gender equality, career opportunities for women, and corporate transparency.   

OutBuro on Apple Podcasts - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on Spotify - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on Stitcher - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews

OutBuro Voices on iHeartRadio Interviews Conversations with LGBTQ professionals entrepreneur startup community leaders gay lesbian business owners journey 75
OutBuro on Google Podcasts - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews

OutBuro on Pocket Casts- LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on TuneIn - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on Breaker Podcasts - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on Castbox Podcasts - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on Radio Public - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on Player-fm - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Review
OutBuro on Podbean - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Review
OutBuro on Overcast - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on happiTV - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Review
OutBuro Voices on YouTube - LGBT professionals glbt entrepreneurs gay business startup lesbian leaders community interviews

We’d love your text comments at the bottom of each show episode page asking questions of me, our guests, and interacting with other commenters.

We also have the feature where you may “call-in” and leave a recorded message. Your recorded message may be used in future episodes and requires a simple registration on the podcast platform

Romy Newman Fairygodboss co-founder social entrepreneur women professional networking community rate employer ratings compay reviews corporate transparency

Romy brings a long and rich career background in marketing and business development to Fairygodboss.  Co-founded with Georgene Huang, Fairygodboss is a community network centered on career women, employer branding, and job marketplace aiding employers to reach the female demographic supporting their workplace equality strategy.  Women may anonymously rate recent past and current employers.  This provides insights for the employer on how they are doing while providing the female job seeker employer information not found anywhere else so she may make an informed decision if the employer has the benefits and policies that will allow her to thrive as a valued employee team member.    In our casual conversation Romy shares how the idea for Fairgodboss was sparked and how she and co-founder Georgene leverage each of their skills that have resulted as of Feb 2021 to a community of over 2 million members supported by 50 staff at Fairygodboss.   

We discussed challenges and opportunities presented in the workplace due to COVID.   

Join OutBüro today, the LGBTQ professional and entrepreneur online community network for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, allies and our employers who support LGBTQ welcoming workplace equality focused benefits, policies, and business practices.  https://www.OutBuro.com 

Would you like to be featured like this? Contact the host Dennis Velco.  https://outburo.com/profile/dennisvelco/

Guide to 72 LGBTQ+ Pride Flags

Guide to 72 LGBTQ+ Pride Flags

I will start by saying if you want a flag that represents you, great. Make it, fly it, and wear it proudly. In the below, I am providing both information and the occasional sarcastic comments as I personally find it a tad bit odd that there are so many “Pride Flags”. So in response, I had to add to the lot and therefore I created the Intersectional Pride Flag in July 2020. It truly is an aim to be inclusive. However, based on this list you can rest assured there will be many more to come with various levels of popularism. There are many fetish flags I didn’t include drawing the line somewhere at an already huge list. It also made me wonder why no one has yet created a flag for others. My curiosity and admittedly slightly sarcastic nature had to get this accomplished to reduce the rabbit hole effect. I hope you find this useful, informative, and via the comments provide your thoughts, design ideas, and comments.

This list is broken into pages in an attempt to make it digestible and allow comments on pages of topically similar designs.

1. Gilbert Baker Pride Flag – The Original

In 1977, gay politician Harvey Milks tasked veteran Gilbert Baker to come up with a Pride flag. Milk said he felt that queer people “needed something that was positive, that celebrated our love.” Inspired by Judy Garland’s “Over the Rainbow,” each color has symbolism: Hot pink for sex, red for life, orange for healing, yellow for sunlight, green for nature, turquoise for magic/art, indigo for serenity, and violet for spirit. Gilbert Baker (June 2, 1951 – March 31, 2017) was an American artist, gay rights activist, and designer of the rainbow flag (1978), a worldwide symbol of LGBTQ pride. His flag became widely associated with LGBT rights causes, a symbol of gay pride that has become ubiquitous in the decades since its debut. California state senator Scott Wiener said Baker “helped define the modern LGBT movement

gilbert-baker-lgbtq-pride-flag

2. LGBTQ Pride Flag – 1978-1999

Harvey Milk was assassinated in 1978, and demand for the flag increased as people wanted to show their support. Apparently, Baker had trouble getting the pink color, so the flag began selling with seven colors instead. He also replaced the teal with the second shade of purple on the lavender side.

Gilbert Baker lgbtq pride flag adapted version-with-hot-pink-removed-due-to-fabric-unavailability professional entrepreneurs gay lesbian trans queer bisexual

3. LGBTQ+ Pride Flag – Today’s Common

This is probably the flag you’ll see most often: Six colors, apparently easier to produce than the odd-numbered seven. The rainbow flag can operate as a general flag for the LGBTQ+ community, but according to some, it’s not necessarily all-inclusive as also apparent with this huge list of pride flags of all sorts. Many of the following flags (intersex, asexual, non-binary, etc.) embody different identities that exist within Q (queer) and/or outside this acronym while others represent fetishes.

main traditional lgbtq pride flag gay lesbian transgender trans queer bisexual asexual pansexual intersex professional entrepreneur online community outburo

4. Philadelphia People of Color-Inclusive Flag

Philadelphia added brown and black at the top of their flag in 2017 to spotlight the importance of including queer people of color in the LGBTQ+ community. This caused some debate within LGBTQ+ circles. LGBTQ+ persons span all races. Are the plight and struggles different, sure yet even in the white/caucasian LGBTQ community, there are struggles. The original rainbow flag didn’t exclude persons of color. Aren’t all persons important? Adding race in an exclusionary manner puts one above the other. Where are the white and salmon flesh tone stripes if it aims to be inclusive? Is representation good? Sure. Is increased visibility good? Sure. I personally view all people as shades of brown, from a pale tan to a dark brown. Artistically, having the colors black and brown on top just visually doesn’t work. Putting race literally above all else in the LGBTQ community to me personally doesn’t work. I get the idea and appreciate the concept. But artistically the execution flounders. Again, this and the following drove me to toss my attempt into the ring.

Philadelphia People of Color-Inclusive Flag lgbtq gay lesbian trans queer transgender bisexual asexual intersex pansexual professionals entrepreneurs online networking community outburo

5. Progress Pride Flag

This flag takes inclusion even further, thanks to queer, nonbinary artist Daniel Quasar (xe/xem).

Graphic designer Daniel Quasar has added a five-colored chevron to the LGBT Rainbow Flag to place a greater emphasis on “inclusion and progression”.

Quasar‘s Progress Pride Flag adds five arrow-shaped lines to the six-coloured Rainbow Flag, which is widely recognised as the symbol of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) communities.

The flag includes black and brown stripes to represent marginalized LGBT communities of color, along with the colors pink, light blue, and white, which are used on the Transgender Pride Flag.

Overall I get and appreciate this design over the Phillidelphia Color-Inclusive Flag. I appreciate having the Trans flag incorporated. But, alas exactly how did the common 6 colors of the rainbow exclude anyone? That it didn’t include Charchruce and Periwinkle that to you represents something. Ok. So, this includes the Trans community. Now, what about asexuals, intersex, pansexual, demisexuals, how are bisexuals, leather, twinks, bears, and all others represent?

By adding and thus complicating a simple already nonexclusionary symbol the attempts at being inclusive is actually exclusionary. Again. If you want a flag, great. Create it and fly it proudly. If that doesn’t represent me I am personally OK with that. But, if stating it is inclusive, be apparently fully inclusive. I like the name of this, Progress Flag. Its progress led to me creating the Intersectional Flag.

progress -Inclusive Flag lgbtq gay lesbian trans queer transgender bisexual asexual intersex pansexual professionals entrepreneurs online networking community outburo

6. Intersectional Pride Flag

Created by LGBTQ social entrepreneur, founder of OutBüro – the LGBTQ Professional and Entrepreneur Community, and artist Dennis Velco in July 2020 in an attempt to represent the full LGBQ spectrum in an inclusive manner building upon the tradition, progress, and color inclusive designs. At the foundation and widest encircling colors are those that represent persons of color. White on the top while black on the foundation bottom as in the light spectrum all colors in between. Artistically black is a weighted, heavy color and in a simple design makes sense to represent the grounding base. The circle is a universal symbol with extensive meaning. It represents the notions of totality, wholeness, original perfection, the self, the infinite, eternity, timelessness, all cyclic movement, and a higher power. In the Intersectional Pride Flag, transparent circles of color overlap the strips and other circles creating structure and numerous additional shades of color. At the center is a yellow circle often referenced in other Pride Flag as representing gender and non-gender. It sits over Pink and Blue interlocking circles that are encompassed and intertwined with magenta, a pinkish purple all together harkening to complexities and spectrums of gender identity and expressions with complementary color flanking on either side balancing the composition that is you.

Notice how then black and white circles break the border boundaries and overlap into the other color strips. Just as LGBTQ+ persons break boundaries and strive to reach and grow beyond imposed borders.

Due to the design as noted many ranges of colors are present. I specifically left out additional symbols other than the stripe and the circle. I left current and future specific iconography to others to serve unique subcultures and the fetish community.

Critics and comments welcomed. The design needs some fine touch adjustment as it was created in a PowerPoint-like software without fine graphic editing ability.

OutBuro Intersectional Pride Flag by Dennis Velco Created July 2020 lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneur

7. Lesbian Labrys Flag

This flag isn’t widely used—and part of the reason may be that the flag was thoughtfully designed in 1999 by a gay man, Sean Campbell. The design involves a labrys, a type of double-headed axe, superimposed on the inverted black triangle, set against a violet background. Among its functions, the labrys was associated as a weapon used by the Amazons of mythology. In the 1970s it was adopted as a symbol of empowerment by the lesbian feminist community. Women considered asocial by the Third Reich because they did not conform to the Nazi ideal of a woman, which included homosexual females, were condemned to concentration camps and wore an inverted black triangle badge to identify them. Some lesbians reclaimed this symbol as gay men reclaimed the pink triangle (many lesbians also reclaimed the pink triangle although lesbians were not included in Paragraph 175 of the German criminal code). The color violet became associated with lesbians via the poetry of Sappho.

lesbian labrys pride flag lgbtq gay trans queer bisexual transgender professionals business owners entrepreneursonline networking community outburo

8. Lipstick Lesbian Pride Flag

The Lipstick Lesbian Pride Flag represents lesbians with a ‘more feminine gender expression’.

The original version had a lipstick kiss symbol in the top right corner but the flag is also used without the kiss.

Some people have presented this flag as an alternative flag for the whole lesbian community. However, others have rejected this idea, arguing that the red and pink shades do not represent butch women.

Lipstick Lesbian Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

9. Femme Lesbian Flag

Interestingly, this flag has a controversial element—it used to be called the “lipstick lesbian” flag and had a pair of lips on the upper left corner. It was designed by Natalie McCray in 2010 to celebrate lesbian femmes but isn’t necessarily loved for its lack of inclusivity.

lesbian pride flag femme lgbtq professional community networking groups online rate your empoyer ratings company reviews outburo

10. Butch Lesbian Flag

The Butch Lesbian Flag is designed to represent lesbians with a more ‘masculine’ or ‘dominant’ personality, style, or identity.

It’s a redesign of the original rainbow flag and the pink lesbian flag which is associated with more ‘femme’ lipstick lesbians (see below). The colour scheme of blues, purple, grey and white was apparently just designed as a ‘butch makeover’ of the flag.

Butch Lesbian flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

11. Lesbian Pride Flag

The Lesbian Community Pride Flag, or just Lesbian Pride Flag, was inspired by the earlier Lipstick Lesbian Pride Flag (see below).

This design, introduced on social media in 2018, took the pink and red colors from the earlier flag and added a dark orange bar to indicate gender nonconformity. 

Lesbian Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

12. Lesbian Twink Flag

lesbian twink Pride Flag lgbtq gay lesbian transgender queer bisexual trans asexual intersex pansexual professional entrepreneurs online networking community outburo

The Gay Men Pride Flags

Not to be left out of the pride flag creation, the following is a series of developments representing gay Men via pride flags. Interesting if you search Lesbian Flag, Transgender Flag and others, the search result will instantly show those unique flags. However, if you search Gay Flag most results will be the overall LGBTQ Pride flags. You have to be more specific and search, “gay man pride flag”. Personally, I have never seen any of these flags periods to my research for this article.

13. GAY Male Pride Flag 1

The flag consists of shades of blue and azure, symbolizes the attraction of men to each other and the diversity of the gay community itself. Blue and azure shades for the gay flag were chosen on the basis that these colors are used for the symbolic image of men and homosexual men in particular.

The Gay Men Pride Flag 1 lgbtq gay lesbian transgender queer bisexual trans asexual intersex pansexual professional entrepreneurs online networking community outburo

14. GAY Male Pride Flag 2

As if many shades of blue weren’t clear enough, another version adds the double male symbol to drive the message home.

The Gay Men Pride Flag 4 lgbtq gay lesbian transgender queer bisexual trans asexual intersex pansexual professional entrepreneurs online networking community outburo

15. GAY Male Pride Flag 3

After the introduction of the above, some took offense that only shades of blue where used citing the stereotypical color associated with males so another version was created adding shades of green to teals.

The Gay Men Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

16. GAY Male Pride Flag 4

Yet another simplied version reduced the number of stripes.

The Gay Men Pride Flag 3 lgbtq gay lesbian transgender queer bisexual trans asexual intersex pansexual professional entrepreneurs online networking community outburo

17. Gay Twink Flag

gay twink Pride Flag lgbtq gay lesbian transgender queer bisexual trans asexual intersex pansexual professional entrepreneurs online networking community outburo

18. Bisexual Flag

In 1998, Michael Page wanted to spotlight bisexual people within the LGBTQ+ community. Overlapping over the stereotypical colors for boys (blue) and girls (pink) is lavender—attraction to both sexes. Bisexuality doesn’t necessarily JUST mean an attraction to two sexes, and there are other flags to represent attraction to more than one gender (as you’ll see).

bisexual pride flag lgbtq gay lesbian trans queer tansgender asexual intersex pansexual professionals entrepreneursonline networking community outburo

19. Transgender Pride Flag

Those who are transitioning or have neutral/no gender are also included in the white. Trans woman Monica Helms designed this in 1999. The blue and pink represent boys and girls, and no matter which way you hold it, the flag is always right-side up.

Transgender Pride Flag lgbtq professional online networking community rate employers ratings compay reviews groups outburo

Transgender Bisexual Pride Flags

Below are three versions of a transgender bisexual pride flag.

20. Transgender Bisexual Pride Flag 1

transgender bisexual pride flag 3 lgbtq professional online community groups rate your employer rating company reviews entrepreneurs business owners networking outburo

21. Transgender Bisexual Pride Flag 2

transgender bisexual pride flag 2 lgbtq professional online community groups rate your employer rating company reviews entrepreneurs business owners networking outburo

22. Transgender Bisexual Pride Flag 3

transgender bisexual pride flag 3 lgbtq professional online community groups rate your employer rating company reviews entrepreneurs business owners networking outburo

23. Intersex Flag

Intersex International Australia designed this flag in 2013 with non-gendered colors “that celebrate living outside the binary.” Intersex (variation in sex characteristics) is also represented in the transgender flag (see next slide).

intersex pride flag lgbtq online professional networking community outburo groups entrepreneurs mentors

24. Agender Flag

Designer Salem X or “Ska” created a reversible flag—much like the transgender flag—to represent the rejection of gender. Green is nonbinary, and black and white are absence of gender.

agender-flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

25. Genderfluid/Genderflexible Flag

This flag was designed to embody all that genderfluidity can contain (since their gender can vary over time): Pink for femininity, blue for masculinity, white for no gender, black for all genders, and purple for the combination between masculine and feminine. JJ Poole created the flag in 2012.

Genderfluid Genderflexible Flag pride flag lgbtq professional community groups online networking rate employers ratings company reviews outburo

26. Genderqueer Flag

Marilyn Roxie designed the genderqueer flag to represent those identifying outside the gender binary: lavender is androgeny, white is agender, and green is nonbinary. This is also known as the “nonbinary” flag.

genderqueer nonbinary pride flag lgbtq professional groups networking community online employer ratings company reviews outburo

27. Nonbinary Flag

To add to the genderqueer flag’s representation, 17-year-old Kye Rowan created the nonbinary flag in 2014 for gender existing outside the binary (symbolized by the yellow). White is all genders, black is no gender, and purple is a mix of genders.

nonbinary-flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

28. Androgynous Pride Flag

Androgynous people are a mix of both male and female. The blue stripe represents masculinity and the pink femininity. The grey area represents that the metaphorical ‘grey area’ between these two genders.

Of course, androgynous people don’t necessarily feel exactly equally male and female – you can be slightly more masculine or feminine. But the flag forms an ‘equals’ sign to signify gender equality.

Androgynous Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

29. Bigender Pride Flag

If you are bigender you feel simultaneous both male and female. Or you may swap between those roles or take the best of both.

Unsurprisingly, the pinks and blues represent femininity and masculinity respectively. The purple stripes are for those genders combined.

Lastly, the white stripe is taken from the center of the Trans Pride Flag (see below). In this case, white stands for non-binary identities and shifting from one gender to another. 

Bigender Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

30. Genderflux Pride Flag

Genderflux people feel different levels of gender identity over time. So they may fluctuate between feeling very female and agendered.

Notably, it is different to genderfuidity. Genderfluid tends to be a variation in the gender they feel (they may vary between male and female). Whereas a genderflux person (in this case a boyflux) would vary between feeling gendered (male) and agender or somewhere in between.

The dark pink stands for female and the lighter pink for demigirl. Similarly, the darker blue for males and a lighter blue for demiboy. The grey stripe represents agender and the yellow, nonbinary.

Genderflux Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

31. Trigender Pride Flag

As the name implies, trigender people experience exactly three genders. They may feel all three at once or vary between them.

The flag’s meaning is simple. Pink stands for feminine genders, blue for masculine and green represents the range of non-binary genders.

Trigender Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

Demigender Pride Flags

Demigender literally means ‘half gender’ but practically is an umbrella term for people who are nonbinary but have a partial connection to a certain gender.

32. Demigender Pride Flag – Neutral

The grey, yellow and white striped Demigender Pride Flag is the most common used for them.

Demigender Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

33. Demigender Pride Flag – Masculine

But there is also this flag for the partly male ‘demiboys’.

Demigender demiboys Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

34. Demigender Pride Flag – Femme

And this flag for the partly female ‘demigirls’.

Demigender demigirls Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

35. Neutrois Pride Flag

Neutrois people typically identify as having no or neutral gender. In some cases they may want to reduce the physical signs of their sex so they appear more gender neutral.

White represents being neutral, unidentified, or questioning gender.

Dark chartreuse green is the ‘opposite’ of lavender, a mix of pink and blue. So this stripe symbolises being not male or female or a mix of those.

Black is for being agender or genderless.

Neutrois Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

36. Gender Questioning Pride Flag

Anyone who is questioning whether they are really cisgender may identify as gender questioning.

And an artist named Roswell created this flag in 2017 to represent them.

It takes colors from other gender flags with the pink and blue spectrums representing levels of femininity and masculinity. Meanwhile, the grey in the middle symbolizes uncertainty and seeking answers.

Gender Questioning Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

37. Two-Spirit Pride Flag

Two-Spirit is a modern, pan-Indian term to describe people who have been part of Native American culture for countless generations.

Simply, Two-Spirit people have both a male and female spirit within them and see life through the eyes of both genders. Many indigenous communities not only accepted these two-spirit, or third-gender, people but gave them a ceremonial role in their culture.

Two-Spirit is often confused by outsiders with being ‘gay Indian’ or ‘LGBT+ Native American’. But the term was created to preserve the cultural history of these particular LGBT+ Native Americans, rather than for the whole community.

The flag’s simple design combines the traditional rainbow flag with a double feather.

Two-Spirit Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

38. Hijra Pride Flag

Hijra share both a long culture and a gender identity. Across South Asia, hijra live together in small groups, guided by a guru. Hijras include trans women, intersex and other gender non-conforming people.

Hindu and Muslim religions recognize them but also ostracize them. However India, Nepal, Pakistan and Bangladesh offer ‘third gender’ – neither male or female – passports to hijras.

The flag combines both gender and spiritual symbolism. So: ‘Pink and blue are for those of us [hijras] who identify with binary genders as trans people, while the white is for those of us who are nonbinary, the red represents the divinity we were blessed with by [Hindu god] Rama.’

Hijra Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

39. Maverique Pride Flag

Maveriques have a gender – and feel they have a gender – but it is completely separate from male or female.

The designer used yellow because it is a primary color. Therefore, it is completely separate from other colors (like pink or blue) just as maverique is separate from male and female identities.

The white stripe represents independence from the gender binary. White is not on the spectrum of colors so is a blank slate on which maveriques put their own identity.

Finally, orange stands for the burning inner conviction that a maverique feels about their gender. It is perceived as an unorthodox color, again reflecting maverique identity.

Maverique Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

40. Pangender Pride Flag

Pangender people typically embrace all genders or a large number of genders. They may be genderfluid too, in which case they are fluid between many genders over a period of time.

The colors on the flag are deliberately bright to represent the abundance of genders.

White is used as it is a combination of all colors, and therefore all genders. Yellow signifies genders that are not related to female and male. Meanwhile red shows the transition to masculine and feminine genders. And violet-pink combines male and female.

Pangender Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

41. Pocket Gender Pride Flag

One of the more interesting parts of gender discovery is the little world of pocket genders. Technically these are a range of gender identities that are only held by one or a few people.

Often pocket gender discussion groups allow people to discuss or discover different, radical or even eccentric ways of experiencing a gender.

Alex Stowe created the pocket gender flag.

Firstly the colours. Pink and blue represent feminity and masculinity. Purple is a mix of both traditional genders but also genderlessness. Likewise black represents either a mix of genders or a lack of gender. Orange stands for Maverique, a specific non-binary identity (see above).

In this case, Stowe specifically chose triangles rather than stripes used in other Pride flags. They wanted to show the levels of the genders may vary.

Pocket Gender Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

42. Pansexual Flag

This flag, for example, represents pansexuality’s interest in all genders: Pink for women, blue for men, yellow for “nonbinary and gender-nonconforming people.” It was created in 2010 to distinguish pansexuality from bisexuality.

If you can be attracted to people regardless of their gender, you are pansexual or omnisexual. You may think of yourself as gender-blind. Some pansexuals feel they could be attracted to a humanoid alien.

But more practically level, it’s not letting someone’s gender define who you fancy. Of course, many bisexuals also feel they are attracted to people who are not male or female but another gender. But pansexuals make this more explicit.

The Pansexual Pride Flag emerged on the internet around 2010 and has become popular since.

It’s based on a similar design to the bisexual flag with three horizontal stripes. Unsurprisingly pink represents attraction to women, blue to men and yellow to people who are neither male nor female.

pansexual pride flag lgbtq gay lesbian trangender queer trans asexual intersex professional entrepreneursonline networking community outburo

43. Asexual Flag

In 2010, the Asexual Visibility and Education Network stated that they wanted to “have a symbol that belongs to all of us.” The flag is inspired by their logo; Black represents asexuality, gray for graysexuals (between sexual and asexual), and demisexual (sexual attraction following emotional connection). Purple represents the community. A demisexual flag also exists with similar colors in a different configuration.

Asexual Demisexual pride flag lgbtq gay lesbian transgender queer trans pansexual intersex professional entrepreneurs online networking community outburo

44. Polysexual Flag

Polysexual (attracted to multiple but not all genders, unlike pansexual) is still similar to the pansexual flag, with green representing non-conforming genders and pink and blue female and male, respectively. Polysexuality can sometimes be expressed as an attraction to masculinity/femininity, not gender. The flag was created on Tumblr in 2012.

polysexual-flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

45. Aromantic Flag

In a similar color scheme, the green in the aromantic flag represents those living without romantic attraction or different romantic attraction. Gray and black are meant to represent all aromantic sexualities.

Aromantic-flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

46. Demisexual Pride Flag

Demisexuals aren’t totally asexual. They may be sexually attracted to someone, but once they’ve fallen in love.

The Demisexual Pride Flag uses the same colors as the asexual flag. So black represents asexuality, white for non-asexual friends and partners, purple for the community, and grey for grey-asexuality.

Demisexual Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

47. Graysexual Pride Flag

Graysexuals feel somewhere between asexual (not interested in sex) and sexual (interested in sex). This is a deliberately vague term, for people who don’t want to be defined too narrowly.

The flag, also known as the Gray-A or Gray-ace Flag uses similar colors to the asexual and demisexual flags. Just like them, purple means community, grey for graysexuality and white for non-asexual friends and partners.

Graysexual Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

48. Omnisexual Pride Flag

Omnisexuality is literally attraction to people of all genders. It’s slightly different to pansexuality which is attraction to people regardless of their gender. But, of course, individuals may be both omnisexual and pansexual.

The pink shades, unsurprisingly, mean attraction to feminine people and the blue attraction to masculine people. In the center, the black stripe stands for other genders.

Omnisexual Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

49. Polyamory Flag

Just as the symbol pi goes on indefinitely after the decimal, there are infinite partners available to those who identify as polyamorous. Gold represents emotional connection, not just sexual love. A modified version was created in 2017 with infinity hearts instead of the pi symbol.

polyamory pride flag lgbtq professionals business owners employees entrepreneursonline networking community outburo

50. Bear Brotherhood Flag

Craig Byrnes and Paul Witzkoske in 1995 made the “bear flag” for “a subculture of masculine-presenting gay, bisexual and trans men who embrace facial and body hair and may have larger bodies.” Each stripe represents the different colors of bears.

bear-brotherhood-flag-lgbtq pride gan men masculine professional online networking community groups rate your employer ratings company reviews outburo

51. Leather, Latex, & BDSM Flag

There’s also debate over this flag, centered around whether kinks exist within or outside of the LGBTQ+ community. But the most widely celebrated of Tony DeBlase’s achievements in the world of leather is and probably always will be the Leather Pride Flag which he presented to the world as a “proposed design idea” on May 28, 1989, at International Mr. Leather. As the creator of the flag, he was often asked to explain the colors and design, but consistently refused to do so, insisting that each person could do that for himself. The design was immediately embraced and began appearing in parades within a month of its introduction, and turned up in shops as a bumper sticker barely two months later. Deconstructions and re-compositions of the flag’s familiar black, blue and white stripes with a red accent-originally a heart-are common, but the design itself was accepted worldwide as introduced. More info here.

leather-latex-bdsm-flag-lgbtq professional online community groups rate your employer ratings company reviews gay lesbian queer bisexual trans outburo

52. Female Leather, BDSM flag

Te flags can be horizontal or at an angle. That is purely artistic with no addition meaning. The blue of Leather Pride is substituted with pink to represent female leather-lovers. Designed by Sheryl Dee for the Ms San Diego Leather Contest in November 2003.

leather-latex-bdsm-female-flag-lgbtq professional online community groups rate your employer ratings company reviews gay lesbian queer bisexual trans outburo

53. Boy-Boi Pride Flag

The Boy-Boi Pride Flag was created and designed by boy Keith and debuted at Mid-Atlantic Leather in 1999. The original flag now hangs in the Leather Archives and Museum in Chicago, IL.

leather-boy-latex-bdsm-flag-lgbtq professional online community groups rate your employer ratings company reviews gay lesbian queer bisexual trans outburo

54. Fetish Pride Flag

fetish pride flag lgbtq professional online community groups rate your employer rating company reviews entrepreneurs business owners networking outburo

55. Switch Pride Flag

Some members of the leather and BDSM communities enjoy taking both dominant and passive roles, switching from one to the other. This is represented by the 2 arrows. I can find no reference to it before 2009. More information into its symbolism, history, etc. can be found here: http://c4bl3fl4m3.dreamwidth.org/16143.html

switch bdsm-flag-lgbtq professional online community groups rate your employer ratings company reviews gay lesbian queer bisexual trans outburo

56. Fat Fetish Pride Flag

Designed to represent someone who is attracted to persons of obease weight.

fat pride flag lgbtq professional online community groups rate your employer rating company reviews entrepreneurs business owners networking outburo

57. Military and Uniform Fetish Flag

The Military Fetish Flag has been floating around on the web for sometime; sadly Its creator is unknown. The flag appears here for the community and not for any commercial use.

military-uniform-fetish-pride-flag lgbtq professional online community groups rate your employer rating company reviews entrepreneurs business owners networking outburo

58. BDSM Pride Flag

Primarily seen in european counties, the BDSM Rights Flag
is intended to represent the belief that people whose sexuality or relationship preferences include Bondage and Discipline, Dominance and Submission, or Sadism and Masochism (“BDSM”) deserve the same human rights as everyone else, and should not be discriminated against for pursuing BDSM with consenting adults.

The flag is inspired by the Leather Pride Flag and Quagmyr’s BDSM Emblem, but is specifically intended to represent the concept of BDSM Rights and to be without the other symbols’ restrictions against commercial use. It’s designed to be recognizable by people familiar with either the Leather Pride Flag or BDSM Triskelion (or Triskele) as “something to do with BDSM”; and to be distinctive whether reproduced in full color, or in black and white (or another pair of colors). For more information: http://www.bdsmrights.com/

bdsm-flag-lgbtq professional online community groups rate your employer ratings company reviews gay lesbian queer bisexual trans outburo

59. Owner Pride Flag

master slave bdsm pride flag 2 lgbtq professional online community groups rate your employer rating company reviews entrepreneurs business owners networking outburo

60. Master/Slave Pride Flag

The “Master/slave and Dom/sub Flag” was unveiled at the Master/slave Conference in DC in July 2005 by Master Tallen and Slave Andrew. For more information, please visit their website: http://www.masterslaveflag.com/html/home.html.

master slave bdsm pride flag lgbtq professional online community groups rate your employer rating company reviews entrepreneurs business owners networking outburo

61. Demisexual BDSM Pride Flag

demisexual bdsm pride flag lgbtq professional online community groups rate your employer rating company reviews entrepreneurs business owners networking outburo

62. Bootblack Pride Flag

After a two year debate within the community, on July 4th, 2005 Jesse ‘Spanky’ Penley came up with a design that would eventually become the accepted Boot Black Pride Flag. … The large red heart positioned behind the boot signifies the heart that the bootblack puts behind his or her boots. A Bootblack is someone who tends to boots such as shining.

bootblack pride flag-lgbtq professional online community groups rate your employer ratings company reviews gay lesbian queer bisexual trans outburo

63. Puppy Pride Flag

This is a flag that represents a part of the community into Pet Play. It is semi-derivative of the leather flag, but on an angle, and with a red-bone in the middle. The White stripe is slightly bigger to represent the broadness of the community, the bone represents the unconditional, non-judgmental heart of the puppy.

Created in 2011 by Pup Flip Gray (LeatherPup) for the Tampa Leather Club, the Tampa Bay Leather Sir & Leather boy Contest, The Saint Petersburg Pride Parade and the Tampa Bay Leather n Fetish Pride Event.

The Puppy Pride Flag has the same number of stripes as the Leather Pride Flag. The stripes are set on a 30 degree diagonal reminiscent of the boy flag to indicate a new direction. The white stripe is wider than the other stripes to represent the broadness of the puppy movement. The blood red bone in the center of the flag indicates the unconditional, non-judgmental heart of the puppy.

For more information: http://www.leatherpups.com/z

Puppy Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

64. Foot Fetish Pride Flag

foot fetish bdsm-flag-lgbtq professional online community groups rate your employer ratings company reviews gay lesbian queer bisexual trans outburo

65. Rubber Pride Flag

Members of the rubber/latex fetish community have a flag to express their preferences and passion. Peter Tolos and Scott Moats created it in 1995 and say that black represents “our lust for the look and feel for shiny black rubber,” red “our blood passion for rubber and rubbermen,” and yellow “our drive for intense rubber play and fantasies.” Also, there’s a kink in it—which totally makes sense, actually.

rubber latex kink flag lgbtq professional online community groups rate your employer rating company reviews entrepreneurs business owners networking outburo

66. Pony Flag

Another fetish flag, the pony play flag was designed in 2007 by Carrie P., and includes black to express unity with the larger leather community.

pony-flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

67. Watersports Fetish Pride Flag

water sports piss play fetish bdsm-flag-lgbtq professional online community groups rate your employer ratings company reviews gay lesbian queer bisexual trans outburo

68. Drag or Feather Pride Flag

The Feather Pride Flag is a symbol for the drag community. Artist Sean Campbell created it in 1999.

The phoenix represents the rebirth of the LGBT+ community. Meanwhile, as a mythical firebird it also stands for the ‘fires of passion’ the drag community had in the early days of HIV [and] AIDS epidemic when drag artists were key fundraisers.

Drag or Feather Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

69. Drag Pride Flag

The alternative drag flag debuted much later in 2016. It was the result of a worldwide competition run by Austin International Drag Foundation to symbolize pride among drag queens and drag kings.

The flag’s designer Veranda L’Ni set out the meaning as follows:

Purple represents a shared passion for drag. White stands for ‘the blank slate that is our bodies and face and that we all change to create the characters that we become’. Blue symbolises both self expression and loyalty.

Finally, the crown is for leadership in the LGBT+ community and the stars for the many forms of drag.

OutBuro Voices Interview Matthew French Awesomely Authentic Career Coach Educational College Prep Diversity Inclusion Consulting LGBT Professionals Gay Entrepreneurs LGBTQ Students

70. Straight Ally Flag

This is a combination of different symbols—the straight flag is black and white stripes, the traditional pride flag is a rainbow—and the combination is meant to show allyship for the LGBTQ+ community

Straight Ally flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo

71. Straight Pride Flag

The simple black and white stripe version, a mockery and opposite of Gilbert Baker’s rainbow design, is the most common version. Alternatives are similar, with shades of grey, black and white.

The Ally Flag (see above) is, of course, the LGBT+ supportive antidote to this from straight, cisgender people.

Straight Pride Flag-lgbtq pride professional online community groups rate your emploer rating company reviews gay lesbian queer trans entrepreneurs outburo
AJ Mizes the human reach career coaching leadership development hr consulting lgbt entrepreneur lgbtq professional gay bussiness owner outburo networking community lesbian trans

AJ Mizes: 80% of Jobs are Filled Through Connections

In this episode of OutBüro Voices featuring LGBTQ professionals, entrepreneurs, and community leaders from around the world, host Dennis Velco chats with AJ Mizes a career coach, leadership coach, and HR consultant.   

OutBuro on Apple Podcasts - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on Spotify - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on Stitcher - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews

OutBuro Voices on iHeartRadio Interviews Conversations with LGBTQ professionals entrepreneur startup community leaders gay lesbian business owners journey 75
OutBuro on Google Podcasts - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews

OutBuro on Pocket Casts- LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on TuneIn - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on Breaker Podcasts - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on Castbox Podcasts - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on Radio Public - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on Player-fm - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Review
OutBuro on Podbean - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Review
OutBuro on Overcast - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Reviews
OutBuro on happiTV - LGBTQ Entrepreneures Professionals Leaders Community Careers LBGT Corporate Equality Ratings Employer Workplace Review
OutBuro Voices on YouTube - LGBT professionals glbt entrepreneurs gay business startup lesbian leaders community interviews

We’d love your text comments at the bottom of each show episode page asking questions of me, our guests, and interacting with other commenters.

We also have the feature where you may “call-in” and leave a recorded message. Your recorded message may be used in future episodes and requires a simple registration on the podcast platform

A.J. is a talent and human potential aficionado with over a decade of experience within Career Coaching and Human Resources–and has been featured in NBC, CBS, FOX, The International Business Times, and Yahoo! News.  Most recently, though, AJ left Facebook as a Global HR Leader where he supported an international team and launched many innovative leadership programs under his guidance–that are still in full swing at Facebook today.  He’s supported global teams of over 3,000 people and currently serves as the CEO of The Human Reach–a human potential institute guiding high-achieving professionals to land their dream careers in record time and coaching silicon valley leaders to be thoughtful, effective leaders.  His career stems from a foundation in training and development at KSL Capital, where he coached leaders on how to select, coach, and retain top talent at some of the world’s most prestigious luxury resort properties.  A.J. also served as a leader @ Premier Staffing where he worked alongside well-known tech giants in organizing talent strategy and recruiting tactics.  Before Facebook, AJ was the Vice President of Talent and Engagement at Sungevity—the world’s leading platform technology for residential solar—where he led an HR team that spanned across the United States.   

To connect with AJ find him on OutBüro here. https://outburo.com/profile/ajmizes/ 

Join me and AJ on OutBüro, the LGBTQ professional and entrepreneur online community network for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, allies and our employers who support LGBTQ welcoming workplace equality focused benefits, policies, and business practices.  https://www.OutBuro.com 

Would you like to be featured like this? Contact the host Dennis Velco.  https://outburo.com/profile/dennisvelco/