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Understanding Gender Identity and Expression 101

Understanding gender identity and expression to support education in LGBTQ corporate equality for a welcoming workplace. In Feb 2021 we updated our model to include scales for “other” in our own continued learning evolution and striving to provide content and resources that are reflective of you and all your beautiful complexities. We hope this now is fully inclusive and we remain open to constructive feedback.

Most people when they hear – LGBTQ – they think of it is a group of individuals who are attracted to members of the same sex to some degree. Interestingly, most don’t realize that the “T” does not directly relate to a person’s sexual attraction at all. It is separate and refers to a person’s sense of gender. Inside, do they feel like a male or female or even somewhere in between the two. This is referred to as gender identity.

Before the 19th century, the terms gender and sex were interchangeable. It was believed was what you physically appeared as at birth was cut and dry. Binary. Female or male from birth in body, mind, and soul.

Around 1925, a sexologist named Magnus Hirschfeld from Germany published an article. In it, he described for the first time the difference between the sexual desire for persons of the same gender compared to a deep desire to live and/or dress as the opposite gender because it matches how you feel and view yourself.

In the 1950s the concepts and theories about gender, gender roles, and gender identity were introduced and defined in the psychological literature. Psychologists, such as Jerome Kagan and John Money, initially believed that gender identity was simply a degree a person felt feminine or masculine coupled with the ability to live openly and freely as who they are supporting a secure sense of self.

From around 1965 through 1985 researchers such as Sandra Bem, Richard Green, Harry Benjamin, and, Robert Stoller furthered the understanding of gender and gender identity. Green, Benjamin, and Stoller pioneered gender identity clinics, as well as gender-related medical and surgical treatments.

The ongoing work of these and other pioneer researchers in the field of gender identity development raised awareness that gender is not exclusively determined by assigned sex at birth but determined by a person’s sense, belief, and the ultimate expression of self.

A bit more to understand

The term transgender is an overall term for people whose gender identity, expression and/or behavior is different from those typically associated with their assigned sex at birth. Since the 1990s, transgender has also been used to describe:

  • transsexuals
  • crossdressers
  • androgynous people
  • genderqueers
  • gender non-conforming people

Transgender men had or have female body parts; however, they may identify and/or express themselves as male. Female to male or F2M.

Transgender women had or have male body parts; however, they may identify and/or express themselves as female. Male to female or M2F.

Research shows that gender identity, in many cases, is independent of sexual orientation.

  • Androphilic are people that were born with a male body, have a female gender identity, and are attracted to men. My understanding is like this:
    • M2F Straight
    • F2M Straight.
  • Gynephilia is people that were born with a male body, have a female gender and are attracted to women. My understanding is like this:
    • M2F Lesbian
    • F2M Gay
  • Cis-Gender, is a person who feels that how they mentally identify matches their physical body.
    • Cis-male
    • Cis-female

See: List of LGBTQ+ terms with definitions

Marketors, employers, prevention specialists, and healthcare providers should be aware that beliefs impact almost all areas of a person’s life, their feeling of accepted and being welcomed.

Think about not only your own beliefs and attitudes but how can you impact your place of business, your working environment, policies, benefits. How can you make your company, business, institution more accessible and in some cases safe?

If in my attempts to simplify for the sake of understanding a very complex field I’m happy to be constructively corrected and happy to edit the content if necessary. Please add your comments below.

I’ve already written about the Surrey University study demonstrating a clear bias against persons who are perceived as LGBT in the hiring process, promotions, and salary. Added to the stress of work anyone faces, adds being verbally harassed or worse not just at work but everywhere.

At this point, it’s – Duh!. In order to understand you have to get to know.

If you work for a company if not already happening, suggest or start social gatherings to get to know others out of the work environment. Maybe host a company talent show or other activities that foster interaction embracing the differences. The biggest is connect with others and be open and willing to give everyone an opportunity to shine. Listen carefully. Do you have interests in common? Do you hear an opportunity to partner on a project to help each other and maybe others in the company or community?

OutBüro’s Gender Identity and Expression Model

The concept of gender identity and expression graphic to help explain the concepts is not new. Hower, OutBüro decided to create our own with some modifications to past models to help further clarify the concepts.

Most models to date have a scale with feminine on one end of a spectrum and masculine on the opposite. We believe that having them separately represented is more accurate was of thinking and helps to better understand.

Meet Chris – the OutBüro Gender Identity and Expression Model

In the diagram below consider the lines noting masculine, feminine, and other as each independent sliding scales from 0 to 100%. If using this as a worksheet, consider marking each scale with a pencil where you feel you are on each scale. Either right-click to download as a JPG file or click here to download a PDF version.

Gender Idendity Gender Expression learning discovery teaching aid mode - OutBuro lgbtq professional networking community rate employer ratings company reviews entrepreneurs

Gender Identity

Gender Identity is how you, in your head, experience and define your gender, based on how much you align (or don’t align) with what you understand the options for gender to be. Common associations: personality traits, jobs, hobbies, likes, dislikes, roles, expectations

Gender Expression

Gender Expression is how you present gender (through your actions, clothing, and demeanor, to name a few), and how those presentations are viewed based on social expectations. Common associations: style, grooming, clothing, mannerisms, affect, appearance, hair, make-up

Anatomical Sex

Anatomical Sex is the physical traits you’re born with or develop that we think of as “sex characteristics,” as well as the sex you are assigned at birth. Common associations: body hair, chest, hips, shoulders, hormones penis, vulva, chromosomes, voice pitch

Attraction

Attraction is how you find yourself feeling drawn (or not drawn) to some other people, in sexual, romantic, and/or other ways (often categorized within gender).

What does LGBTQ mean OutBuro professional online networking community gay lesbian bisexual transgender queer intersex asexual pansexual entrepreneurs

What does LGBTQ mean?

Have you stumbled on these letters or heard someone use them and not quite sure about its meaning? LGBTQ stands for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer.

You may also see LGBTQ+, many feel Queer is an umbrella all-inclusive all-encompassing term. Other Don,t and will add the “+” symbol to represent the full spectrum of the community.

On social media, in marketing, in texting, and generally anywhere you may see other variations. Basically here is what each letter represents and for definitions and a broader list check out our List of LGBTQ+ terms with definitions.

  • L = Lesbian
  • G = Gay and/or Genderqueer. Sometimes two G’s are presented
  • B = Bisexual
  • T = Transgender
  • Q = Queer and/or questioning sometimes a second Q is provided
  • I = Intersex
  • A = Asexual
  • P = Pansexual and/or Polygamous
  • A = a second A is for Allies and/or Aromantic. Sometimes all three A’s will be present
  • K = Kink

Here are some variations you may see:

  • LGBTQI
  • LGBTIQ
  • LGBTQAI
  • LGBTQAI+
  • LGBTI
  • GLBT
  • LGBTQIAP
  • LGBTQIAPK
  • LGGBTQQIAAAPPK

Check out these additional guides:

LGBTQ+ Terms and Definitions OutBuro professional online community gay lesbian bisexual transgender queer intersex asexual pansexual entrepreneurs networking

LGBTQ+ Glossary – 200+ Terms and Definitions

Below is a fairly comprehensive listing of terms used in the LGBTQ+ community although it is a growing list and therefore may not be complete. If you are aware of other terms that you feel should be included please use the Contact Us page, provide the term and your best effort at the definition for consideration to be added here. We appreciate your time and knowledge.

This is not intended to be terms and definitions related to sexual acts. If looking for the definition of “fellatio”, it is not included here.
If interested check out Wikipedia’s Sexual Slang and Glossary of BDSM.

While exploring be sure to check these resources out too:

Ability – uhbil-i-tee ] noun: The quality of having the means or skill to do something. Ability is not permanent, can fluctuate throughout one’s life, and is another aspect of diversity in our communities. Disabilities do not necessarily limit people unless society imposes assumptions that do not account for the variation in people’s abilities.

Ableism – ey-buh-liz-uhm ] noun: The pervasive system of discrimination and exclusion that oppresses people who are differently-abled, including differences in mental, cognitive, emotional, and/or physical abilities, through attitudes, actions, or institutional policies.

Abrosexual – [ ab-roh-sek-shoo-uhl ] adj.: Someone who is abrosexual has a fluid sexual orientation. They experience different sexual orientations over time.

Advocate – [ ad-vuh-keyt ] noun & verb: noun: a person who actively works to end intolerance, educate others, and support social equity for a marginalized group.  verb: to actively support or plea in favor of a particular cause, the action of working to end intolerance or educate others.

Ageism – ey-jiz-uhm ] noun: The pervasive system of prejudice and discrimination that marginalizes people based on their age. This can be perpetuated through stereotypes of youthfulness versus life at an older age and through oppressive policies that subordinate and exclude older folks. Ageism can impact different age groups besides older folks, such as children who are stereotyped as being unable to make big decisions.

Agender – [ ey-jen-der ] 1 adj.: a person with no (or very little) connection to the traditional system of gender, no personal alignment with the concepts of either man or woman, and/or someone who sees themselves as existing without gender. Sometimes called gender neutrois, gender-neutral, or genderless. 2 noun: a person who is agender.

Allosexism – [ al-uhseks-iz-uhm] noun: The pervasive system of discrimination and exclusion that oppresses asexual people built out of the assumption that everyone does and should experience sexual attraction.

Allosexual – [ al-uhsek-shoo-uhl ] adj.: refers to people who do not identify as asexual—that is, people who regularly experience sexual attraction, regardless of their sexual orientation. Asexual, in contrast, refers to people who experience no or little sexual attraction. As a counterpart to asexual, the word allosexual helps normalize and destigmatize asexuality in society.

Allistic – [ al-lis-tik ] adj.: describes a person who is not autistic and is often used to emphasize the privilege of people who are not on the autism spectrum.

Ally – [ al-ahy ] – noun: a (typically straight and/or cisgender) person who supports and respects members of the LGBTQ+ community. We consider people to be active allies who take meaningful action in support and respect.

Allyship – [ al-ahy ship ] – noun:  The action of working to end oppression through support of, and as an advocate with and for, a group other than one’s own

Androgyny – [ ăn-drŏjə-nē ] (androgynous) – 1 noun: a gender expression that has elements of both masculinity and femininity; 2 adj.: occasionally used in place of “intersex” to describe a person with both female and male anatomy, generally in the form “androgyne.”

Androsexual or androphilic – [ an-droh-sek-shoo-uhl ] adj.: being primarily sexually, romantically and/or emotionally attracted to men, males, and/or masculinity.

Aromantic /”ay-ro-man-tic”/ – adj.: experiencing little or no romantic attraction to others and/or has a lack of interest in romantic relationships/behavior. Aromanticism exists on a continuum from people who experience no romantic attraction or have any desire for romantic activities, to those who experience low levels, or romantic attraction only under specific conditions. Many of these different places on the continuum have their own identity labels (see demiromantic). Sometimes abbreviated to “aro” (pronounced like “arrow”).

Asexual – [ ey-sek-shoo-uhl ] adj.: experiencing little or no sexual attraction to others and/or a lack of interest in sexual relationships/behavior. Asexuality exists on a continuum from people who experience no sexual attraction or have any desire for sex, to those who experience low levels, or sexual attraction only under specific conditions. Many of these different places on the continuum have their own identity labels (see demisexual). Sometimes abbreviated to “ace.”

Autism –  aw-tiz-uhm ] (no longer in clinical use) a pervasive developmental disorder that commonly manifests in early childhood, characterized by impaired communication, excessive rigidity, and emotional detachment: now considered one of the autism spectrum disorders described as any of various disorders, as autism and Asperger syndrome, commonly manifesting in early childhood and characterized by impaired social or communication skills, repetitive behaviors, or a restricted range of interests.

Autoromantic – [aw-toh-roh-man-tik] adj.: a term for the experience of romantic attraction to oneself. Its sexual counterpart is autosexual.

Autosexual – [aw-toh-sek-shoo-uhl] adj.: a term for sexual attraction to oneself, especially a preference for masturbation over sexual intercourse. Experiencing romantic feelings towards oneself is called autoromantic.

BDSM – Bondage and Discipline, Dominance and Submission, Sadism and Masochism. BDSM refers to a wide spectrum of activities and forms of interpersonal relationships. While not always overtly sexual in nature, the activities and relationships within a BDSM context are almost always eroticized by the participants in some fashion. Many of these practices fall outside of commonly held social norms regarding sexuality and human relationships.

Bear Community: – a part of the queer community composed of queer men similar in looks and interests, most of them big, hairy, friendly and affectionate speaking sterotypically.  The community aims to provide spaces where one feels wanted, desired, and liked. It nourishes and values an individual’s process of making friends and learning self-care and self-love through the unity and support of the community.  Bears, Cubs, Otters, Wolves, Chasers, Admirers and other wildlife comprise what has come to be known as the Brotherhood of Bears and/or the Bear community. See also: Ursula

Bi erasure – [bahy ih-rey-sher] a short form of bisexual erasure, is the act of ignoring, explaining away, or otherwise dismissing bisexuality in culture, media, or history.

Bicurious – [ bahy-kyoor-ee-uhs ] adj.: a curiosity toward experiencing attraction to people of the same gender/sex (similar to questioning).

Bigender – [ bahy-jen-der ] adj.: a person who fluctuates between traditionally “woman” and “man” gender-based behavior and identities, identifying with two genders (or sometimes identifying with either man or woman, as well as a third, different gender).

Binder/binding – [ bahyn-der ] / [ bahyn-ding ] noun: an undergarment used to alter or reduce the appearance of one’s breasts (worn similarly to how one wears a sports bra).  Binding – verb: the (sometimes daily) process of wearing a binder. Binding is often used to change the way other’s read/perceive one’s anatomical sex characteristics, and/or as a form of gender expression.

Biological sex – [ bahy-uhloj-i-kuhl ] [ seks ] noun: a medical term used to refer to the chromosomal, hormonal and anatomical characteristics that are used to classify an individual as female or male or intersex. Often referred to as simply “sex,” “physical sex,” “anatomical sex,” or specifically as “sex assigned at birth.”

Biphobia – [ bahy-foh-bee-uh ] noun: a range of negative attitudes (e.g., fear, anger, intolerance, invisibility, resentment, erasure, or discomfort) that one may have or express toward bisexual individuals. Biphobia can come from and be seen within the LGBTQ community as well as straight society. biphobic – adj. : a word used to describe actions, behaviors, or individuals who demonstrate elements of this range of negative attitudes toward bisexual people.

Bisexual – [ bahy-sek-shoo-uhl ] 1 noun: a person who experiences attraction to some men and women. 2 adj.: a person who experiences attraction to some people of their gender and another gender. Bisexual attraction does not have to be equally split or indicate a level of interest that is the same across the genders an individual may be attracted to. Often used interchangeably with “pansexual”.

BlaQ/BlaQueer – [ blak ] / [ bla-kweer ] Persons of Black/African descent and/or from the African diaspora who recognize their queerness/LGBTQIA identity as a salient identity attached to their Blackness and vice versa.

Body Image – [ bod-ee ] [ im-ij ] adj.: how a person feels, acts and thinks about their body. Attitudes about our own bodies, in general, are shaped by our communities, families, cultures, media, and our own perceptions. 

Body Policing – [ bod-ee ] [ puhlees-ing ] adj.: any behavior which (indirectly or directly, intentionally or unintentionally) attempts to correct or control a person’s actions regarding their own physical body, frequently with regards to gender expression or size.

Butch – [ booch ] noun & adj.: a person who identifies themselves as masculine, whether it be physically, mentally, or emotionally. ‘Butch’ is sometimes used as a derogatory term for lesbians, but is also be claimed as an affirmative identity label.

Ceterosexual – [ set-er-oh-sek-shoo-uhl ] adj.: Someone who is ceterosexual is a nonbinary person who is primarily sexually attracted to other nonbinary people.

Cis – [ sis ] adj. & noun: short for cisgender, which refers to when a person’s gender identity corresponds to their sex as assigned at birth. Cisgender is the opposite of transgender.

Cisgender – [ sisjen-der ] adj. & noun: 1. agj. a gender description for when someone’s sex assigned at birth and gender identity correspond in an expected way (e.g., someone who was assigned male at birth, and identifies as a man). A simple way to think about it is if a person is not transgender, they are cisgender. The word cisgender can also be shortened to “cis.” 2. noun: a person who is cisgender

Cisnormativity – [ sis-nawr-muh-tiv-i-tee ] noun: the assumption, in individuals and in institutions, that everyone is cisgender, and that cisgender identities are superior to trans* identities and people. Leads to the invisibility of non-cisgender identities. –

Cissexism – [ sis-sek-siz-uhm ] noun: behavior that grants preferential treatment to cisgender people, reinforces the idea that being cisgender is somehow better or more “right” than being transgender, and/or makes other genders invisible.

Closeted – [ kloz-i-tid ] adj.: an individual who is not open to themselves or others about their (queer) sexuality or gender identity. This may be by choice and/or for other reasons such as fear for one’s safety, peer or family rejection, or disapproval and/or loss of housing, job, etc. Also known as being “in the closet.” When someone chooses to break this silence they “come out” of the closet. (see coming out)

Coming out – [ kuhm-ing out ] noun: the process by which one accepts and/or comes to identify one’s own sexuality or gender identity (to “come out” to oneself). verb: the process by which one shares one’s sexuality or gender identity with others.

Constellation – [ kon-stuhley-shuhn ] noun: a way to describe the arrangement or structure of a polyamorous relationship.

Cross-dresser – [ kraws-dres-er ] noun: someone who wears clothes of another gender/sex. Carries no implications of sexual orientation. 

Culture – [ kuhl-cher ] noun: A learned set of values, beliefs, customs, norms, and perceptions shared by a group of people that provide a general design for living and patterns for interpreting life.

Cultural Humility – [ kuhlcher ] [ hyoo-mil-i-tee ] noun: An approach to engagement across differences that acknowledges systems of oppression and embodies the following key practices: 1. a lifelong commitment to self-evaluation and self-critique, 2. a desire to fix power imbalances where none ought to exist, and 3. aspiring to develop partnerships with people and groups who advocate for others on a systemic level. 

Demigirl – [dem-ee-gurl] noun: a gender where a person partially identifies as a woman or with feminine characteristics.

Demiboy/demiguy – [dem-ee-boi] [dem-ee-gahy] noun: a gender where a person partially identifies as a man or with masculine characteristics.

Demiromantic – [ dem-ee-roh-man-tik ] adj.: little or no capacity to experience romantic attraction until a strong sexual connection is formed with someone, often within a sexual relationship.

Demisexual – [dem-ee-sek-shoo-al] adj.: little or no capacity to experience sexual attraction until a strong romantic connection is formed with someone, often within a romantic relationship.

Disability/(Dis)ability/Dis/ability:  [ dis-uhbil-i-tee ]noun: A social construct that identifies any restriction or lack of ability to perform an activity in the manner or within the range considered “typical” for a human being given environments that are constructed for and by the dominant or “typical” person.

Discrimination – [ dih-skrim-uh-ney-shuhn ] noun: Inequitable actions carried out by members of a dominant group or its representatives against members of a marginalized or minoritized group.

Down low – [ doun-loh ] adj.: typically referring to men who identify as straight but who secretly have sex with men. Down low (or DL) originated in, and is most commonly used by, communities of color.

Drag king – [ drag-king ] noun: someone who performs (hyper-) masculinity theatrically.

Drag queen – [ drag-kween ] noun: someone who performs (hyper-) femininity theatrically.

DSG – abv.: is Diverse Sexualities and Genders

Dyke – [ dahyk ] noun: referring to a masculine-presenting lesbian. While often used derogatorily, it is also reclaimed affirmatively by some lesbians and gay women as a positive self-identity term.

Emotional attraction – [ ih-moh-shuh-nl ] [ uhtrak-shuhn ] noun: a capacity that evokes the want to engage in emotionally intimate behavior (e.g., sharing, confiding, trusting, inter-depending), experienced in varying degrees (from little-to-none to intense). Often conflated with sexual attraction, romantic attraction, and/or spiritual attraction.

Enby – [en-bee] adj.: an enby is a nonbinary person. It’s a phonetic pronunciation of NB, short for nonbinary, or people who do not identify their gender as male or female.

Ethnicity – [ eth-nis-i-tee ] noun: A social construct that divides people into smaller social groups based on characteristics such as shared sense of group membership, values, behavioral patterns, language, political and economic interests, history and ancestral geographical base.

Fag/Faggot – [ fag ] [ faguht ] noun: a derogatory term referring to a gay person, or someone perceived as queer. While often used derogatorily, it is also used reclaimed by some gay people (often gay men) as a positive in-group term.

Femboy – [ fem-boi ] adj.: a slang term for a young, usually cisgender male who displays traditionally feminine characteristics. While the term can be used as an insult, some in the LGBTQ community use the term positively to name forms of gender expression.

Feminine-of-center; masculine-of-centeradj.: a phrase that indicates a range in terms of gender identity and expression for people who present, understand themselves, and/or relate to others in a generally more feminine/masculine way, but doesn’t necessarily identify as women or men. Feminine-of-center individuals may also identify as “femme,” “submissive,” “transfeminine,” etc.; masculine-of-center individuals may also often identify as “butch,” “stud,” “aggressive,” “boi,” “transmasculine,” etc.

Feminine-presenting; masculine-presentingadj.: a way to describe someone who expresses gender in a more feminine/masculine way. Often confused with feminine-of-center/masculine-of-center, which generally include a focus on identity as well as expression. –

Femme – [ fem ] noun & adj.: someone who identifies themselves as feminine, whether it be physically, mentally or emotionally. Often used to refer to a feminine-presenting queer woman or people.

Fetish – [ fet-ish ] noun & adj.: In common use, the word fetish is used to refer to any sexually arousing stimuli typically not mainstream viewed outside the common norm. This broader usage of fetish covers parts or features of the body (including obesity and body modifications), objects, situations (role play), and activities (such as smoking or BDSM). For more terms with definitions related to Fetish check out this Wikipedia page. Glossary of BDSM

Fluid/fluidity – [ floo-id ] [ floo-id-i-tee ] adj.: generally with another term attached, like gender-fluid or fluid-sexuality, fluid/fluidity describes an identity that may change or shift over time between or within the mix of the options available (e.g., man and woman, bi and straight).

Folx – [fohks] noun: A variation on the word folksfolx is meant to be a gender-neutral way to refer to members of or signal identity in the LGBTQ community. Because “Folks” is gendered? This one id don’t understand, but it is lut there so presenting here.

FtM / F2M; MtF / M2Fabbr.: female-to-male transgender or transsexual person; male-to-female transgender or transsexual person.

Gay – [ gey ] 1 adj.: experiencing attraction solely (or primarily) to some members of the same gender. Can be used to refer to men who are attracted to other men and women who are attracted to women. 2 adj. : an umbrella term used to refer to the queer community as a whole, or as an individual identity label for anyone who is not straight (see LGBTQ and queer)

Gender – jen-der ] noun: A social construct used to classify a person as a man, woman, or some other identity. Fundamentally different from the sex one is assigned at birth.

Gender binary – [ jen-der bahy-nuh-ree ] noun: the idea that there are only two genders and that every person is one of those two.

Gender expansive – [ jen-der ik-span-siv ] noun: An umbrella term used for individuals who broaden their own culture’s commonly held definitions of gender, including expectations for its expression, identities, roles, and/or other perceived gender norms. Gender expansive individuals include those who identify as transgender, as well as anyone else whose gender in some way is seen to be broadening the surrounding society’s notion of gender.

Gender expression – [ jen-der ik-spreshuhn ] noun: the external display of one’s gender, through a combination of clothing, grooming, demeanor, social behavior, and other factors, generally made sense of on scales of masculinity and femininity. Also referred to as “gender presentation.”

Gender fluid – [ jen-der floo-id ] adj.: a gender identity best described as a dynamic mix of boy and girl. A person who is gender fluid may always feel like a mix of the two traditional genders but may feel more man some days, and more woman other days.

Genderflux – [jen-der-fluhks] adj.: A person who is genderflux experiences a range of intensity within a gender identity.  For example, a person who is boyflux may identify as fully masculine to partially masculine (demiboy) and slightly masculine (libramasculine) to fully agender. 

Genderflux is also used by some as a synonym for gender-fluid more generally

Genderfuck – [jen-der-fuhk] adj.: seeks to subvert traditional gender binary by mixing or bending one’s gender expression, identity, or presentation (e.g., a transgender woman wearing a dress and having a beard may considered genderfuck or engaging in genderfucking).

Gender identity – [ jen-der ahy-den-ti-tee ] noun: the internal perception of one’s gender, and how they label themselves, based on how much they align or don’t align with what they understand their options for gender to be. Often conflated with biological sex, or sex assigned at birth.

Gender-neutral pronouns – are pronouns which don’t carry any kind of association with a particular gender, such as they, sie, or ze. In English, the term gender-neutral pronouns usually refers to third-person pronouns (generally alternatives to he and she), since there are no gendered first- or second-person pronouns (I and you are ungendered).

Gender neutrois – [ jen-der noo-troiz] adj.: see agender

Gender non-conforming1 adj.: a gender expression descriptor that indicates a non-traditional gender presentation (masculine woman or feminine man). 2 adj.: a gender identity label that indicates a person who identifies outside of the gender binary. Often abbreviated as “GNC” not to be confused with the nutritional supplement chain store in the USA.

Gender normative / gender straightadj.: someone whose gender presentation, whether by nature or by choice, aligns with society’s gender-based expectations.

Gender outlaw –jen-der-out-law ] nounA person who refuses to be defined by conventional definitions of male and female.

Gender variant – [ jen-der-vair-ee-uhnt ] adj.: someone who either by nature or by choice does not conform to gender-based expectations of society (e.g. transgender, transsexual, intersex, genderqueer, cross-dresser, etc).

Gendervoid of voidgender [jen-der-void] or [void-jen-der] adj.: a gender expression or identity defined by the lack of an experience of any gender.

Genderism/Cissexism – [ jen-der-iz-uhm ] noun: Is the belief that there are, and should be, only two genders & that one’s gender or most aspects of it, are inevitably tied to assigned sex. In a genderist/cissexist construct, cisgender people are the dominant/agent group and trans/ gender non-conforming people are the oppressed/target group.

Genderqueer – [ jen-der-kweer ] 1 adj.: a gender identity label often used by people who do not identify with the binary of man/woman. 2 adj.: an umbrella term for many gender non-conforming or non-binary identities (e.g., agender, bigender, genderfluid).

Grey-a – [grey-ey] adj.: As with many things in life, sexuality isn’t black and white. Grey-a, or grey-asexuality, refers to sexual identities along a spectrum of asexuality and sexuality. Those who identify as grey-a experience sexual attraction or desire sex only rarely or under certain conditions. People of a variety of gender identities can be grey-a.

GSM – abv: GSM is Gender and Sexual Minorities

Gynesexual/gynephilic – [ guy-nuh-seks-shu-uhl ] adj.: being primarily sexually, romantically and/or emotionally attracted to woman, females, and/or femininity.

Hermaphrodite – [ hur-maf-ruh-dahyt ] noun: an outdated medical term previously used to refer to someone who was born with some combination of typically-male and typically-female sex characteristics. It’s considered stigmatizing and inaccurate. See intersex.

Heteronormativity – [ het-er-uhnawr-muh-tiv ] noun: the assumption, in individuals and/or in institutions, that everyone is heterosexual and that heterosexuality is superior to all other sexualities. Leads to invisibility and stigmatizing of other sexualities: when learning a woman is married, asking her what her husband’s name is. Heteronormativity also leads us to assume that only masculine men and feminine women are straight.

Heterosexism – [ het-er-uhsek-siz-uhm ] noun: behavior that grants preferential treatment to heterosexual people, reinforces the idea that heterosexuality is somehow better or more “right” than queerness, and/or makes other sexualities invisible.

Heterosexual / straight – [ het-er-uhsek-shoo-uhl ] adj.: experiencing attraction solely (or primarily) to some members of a different gender.

Homophobia – [ hoh-muhfoh-bee-uh ] noun: an umbrella term for a range of negative attitudes (e.g., fear, anger, intolerance, resentment, erasure, or discomfort) that one may have toward LGBTQ people. The term can also connote a fear, disgust, or dislike of being perceived as LGBTQ. homophobic – adj. : a word used to describe actions, behaviors, or individuals who demonstrate elements of this range of negative attitudes toward LGBTQ people.

Homosexual/Homosexuality – [ hoh-muhsek-shoo-uhl ] [ hoh-muh-sek-shoo-al-i-tee] adj. & noun: a person primarily emotionally, physically, and/or sexually attracted to members of the same sex/gender. This [medical] term is considered stigmatizing (particularly as a noun) due to its history as a category of mental illness and is discouraged for common use (use gay or lesbian instead).

Internalized oppression – [ in-tur-nl-ahyz-d uhpreshuhn ] noun: The fear and self-hate of one or more of a person’s own identities that occurs for many individuals who have learned negative ideas about their identities throughout childhood. One form of internalized oppression is the acceptance of the myths and stereotypes applied to the oppressed group. 

Intersectionality – [ in-ter-sek-shuhnal-i-tee ] noun: A term coined by law professor Kimberlé Crenshaw in the 1980s to describe the way that multiple systems of oppression interact in the lives of those with multiple marginalized identities.  Intersectionality looks at the relationships between multiple marginalized identities and allows us to analyze social problems more fully, shape more effective interventions, and promote more inclusive advocacy amongst communities.

Intersex – [ in-ter-seks ] adj.: term for a combination of chromosomes, gonads, hormones, internal sex organs, and genitals that differs from the two expected patterns of male or female. Formerly known as hermaphrodite (or hermaphroditic), but these terms are now outdated and derogatory.

Juxera – [juhks-eeruh] ajj.: a gender identity created on the app Tumblr. It can be described as being feminine but not a female, like a girl but not a girl.

Kink(Kinky, Kinkiness) adj.: consensual, non-traditional sexual, sensual, and intimate behaviors such as sadomasochism, domination and submission, erotic roleplaying, fetishism, and erotic forms of discipline.

Latinx – [ La-TEEN-ex ] noun: is a non-gender specific way of referring to people of Latin American descent. The term Latinx, unlike terms such as Latino/a and Latin@, does not assume a gender binary and includes nonbinary folks.

Lavender ceilings – [ lavuhn-der see-ling ] noun: a glass ceiling specifically imposed on LGBTQ people: an unofficial upper limit to their professional advancement and are the result of systemic bias and discrimination against LGBTQ people in the workplace and in society more broadly.

Leather community: A community that encompasses those who enjoy sexual activities involving leather, including leather uniforms or cowboy outfits, and is related to similar fetish-based communities such as sadomasochism, bondage and domination, and rubber. Although the leather community is often associated with the queer community, it can and does include heterosexuals.

Lesbian – [ lez-bee-uhn ] noun & adj.: women who are primarily attracted romantically, erotically, and/or emotionally to other women.

Lesbian-baiting – [lez-bee-uh n beyt-ing] adj.:is the sexist and homophobic practice of labeling women (especially feminists and women whose behavior doesn’t reinforce traditional gender stereotypes) as lesbian in an effort to slur or diminish them.

LGBTQabbr.: shorthand or umbrella t erms for all folks who have a non-normative (or queer) gender or sexuality, there are many different initialisms people prefer. LGBTQ is Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender and Queer and/or Questioning (sometimes people at a + at the end in an effort to be more inclusive); see What Does LGBTQ Mean for a robust list of its many variations.

Lipstick lesbiannoun: Usually refers to a lesbian with feminine gender expression. Can be used in a positive or a derogatory way. Is sometimes also used to refer to a lesbian who is assumed to be (or passes for) straight.

Metrosexual adj.: a man with a strong aesthetic sense who spends more time, energy, or money on his appearance and grooming than is considered gender normative.

Masculine of Center (MOC) – A term coined by B. Cole of the Brown Boi Project to describe folks, including lesbian/queer womyn and trans folks, who lean towards the masculine side of the gender spectrum. These can include a wide range of identities such as butch, stud, aggressive/AG, dom, macha, tomboi, trans-masculine, etc.

#MeToo – noun: a social movement originating among women, advocating for survivors of sexual harassment or violence to speak out about their experiences in order to expose and combat various forms of sexual misconduct. In most cases it ignores boys and men who have faced the same situations.

Microaggressions – Brief and subtle behaviors, whether intentional or not, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative messages of commonly oppressed identities. These actions cause harm through the invalidation of the target person’s identity and may reinforce stereotypes. Examples of microaggressions include a person who is not white being told they speak “good English” or someone saying something is “gay” to mean they think something is bad.

Misgendering – Attributing a gender to someone that is incorrect/does not align with their gender identity.  Can occur when using pronouns, gendered language (i.e. “Hello ladies!” “Hey guys”), or assigning genders to people without knowing how they identify (i.e. “Well, since we’re all women in this room, we understand…”).

MLM – an abbreviation for men who love men, which includes gay men as well as men who are attracted to men and people of other genders.

Monogamy – Having only one intimate partner at any one time; also known as serial monogamy, since “true” monogamy refers to the practice of having only one partner for life (such as in some animal species).

Monosexism – The belief in and systematic privileging of monosexuality as superior, and the systematic oppression of non-monosexuality.

Monosexual: People who have romantic, sexual, or affectional desire for one gender only. Heterosexuality and homosexuality are the most well-known forms of monosexuality.

MSM – an abbreviation for men who have sex with men; they may or may not identify as gay.

MSM / WSWabbr.: men who have sex with men or women who have sex with women, to distinguish sexual behaviors from sexual identities: because a man is straight, it doesn’t mean he’s not having sex with men. Often used in the field of HIV/Aids education, prevention, and treatment.

Multisexual – An umbrella term to describe attraction to more than one gender. It can include sexual attractions like bisexual, polysexual, omnisexual, and others. The aforementioned terms are used by some interchangeably and for others the subtle differences among them are important.

Mx. – / “mix” or “schwa” / – noun: an honorific (e.g. Mr., Ms., Mrs., etc.) that is gender-neutral. It is often the option of choice for folks who do not identify within the gender binary: Mx. Smith is a great teacher.

Neurodiversity – Neurodiversity refers to the natural and important variations in how human minds think. These differences can include autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, dyspraxia, dyslexia, dyscalculia, Tourette Syndrome, and others. Like other variable human traits like race, gender, sexuality, or culture, there is no right or wrong form of diversity. The social dynamics that exert power over other forms of diversity also impact neurodivergent people. Neurodiversity is not something to be cured or corrected to fit some social norm – rather, we should celebrate different forms of communication and self-expression and promote support systems to allow neurodivergent people to thrive. (Neurocosmopolitanism, The National Symposium on Neurodiversity)

Neurodivergent –  “Neurodivergent, sometimes abbreviated as ND, means having a brain that functions in ways that diverge significantly from the dominant societal standards of “normal.” A person whose neurocognitive functioning diverges from dominant societal norms in multiple ways – for instance, a person who is Autistic, has dyslexia, and has epilepsy – can be described as multiply neurodivergent. The terms neurodivergent and neurodivergence were coined by Kassiane Asasumasu, a multiply neurodivergent neurodiversity activist.” (Neurocosmopolitanism)

Neurotypical – “Neurotypical, often abbreviated as NT, means having a style of neurocognitive functioning that falls within the dominant societal standards of “normal.” Neurotypical can be used as either an adjective (“He’s neurotypical”) or a noun (“He’s a neurotypical”).” (Neurocosmopolitanism)

Neutrois – A non-binary gender identity that falls under the genderqueer or transgender umbrellas. There is no one definition of Neutrois, since each person that self-identifies as such experiences their gender differently. The most common ones are: Neutral-gender, Null-gender, Neither male nor female, Genderless and/or Agender. (Neutrois.com)

Non binary/Nonbinary/Non-binary – A gender identity and experience that embraces a full universe of expressions and ways of being that resonate for an individual, moving beyond the male/female gender binary. It may be an active resistance to binary gender expectations and/or an intentional creation of new unbounded ideas of self within the world. For some people who identify as non binary there may be overlap with other concepts and identities like gender expansive and gender non-conforming.

Novosexual – [ noh-voh-sek-shoo-uhl ] adj.: When a person is novosexual, their sexual orientation changes as they experience a change in their gender identity. Both their sexual orientation and gender identity are fluid together. For example, a novosexual person may identify as a gay when they are a man but pansexual when they are nonbinary.

Outing verb: involuntary or unwanted disclosure of another person’s sexual orientation, gender identity, or intersex status.

Omnigender – Possessing all genders. The term is used specifically to refute the concept of only two genders.

Omnisexual – [ om-nuhsek-shoo-uhl ] noun: refers to someone who is romantically, emotionally, or sexually attracted to persons of all genders and orientations. The term is often used interchangeably with pansexual.

Oppression – exists when one social group, whether knowingly or unconsciously, exploits another social group for its own benefit.

  • Individual Level – a person’s beliefs or behaviors that consciously or subconsciously work to perpetuate actions and attitudes of oppression (See internalized oppression)
  • Institutional Level – Institutions such as family, government, industry, education, and religion have policies and procedures that can promote systems of oppression.
  • Societal/Cultural Level – community norms that perpetuate implicit and explicit values that bind institutions and individuals; social norms on what is valued, accepted, or desirable give the individual and institutional levels the justification for systemic oppression.

Orientation – [ ohr-ee-uhn-tey-shuhn ] noun: Orientation is one’s attraction or non-attraction to other people.  An individual’s orientation can be fluid and people use a variety of labels to describe their orientation.  Some, but not all, types of attraction or orientation include: romantic, sexual, sensual, aesthetic, intellectual and platonic.

Pangender – [ pan-jen-der ] adj.: refers to a person whose gender identity that is not limited to one gender and may encompass all genders at once.

Pansexual – [pan-sek-shoo-uh l] adj.: a person who experiences sexual, romantic, physical, and/or spiritual attraction for members of all gender identities/expressions. Often shortened to “pan.”

Pansexual, Omnisexual: Terms used to describe people who have romantic, sexual or affectional desire for people of all genders and sexes. Has some overlap with bisexuality and polysexuality (not to be confused with polyamory).

Phobia – In mental and emotional wellness, a phobia is a marked and persistent fear that is excessive in proportion to the actual threat or danger the situation presents.  Historically, this term has been used inaccurately to refer to systems of oppression (i.e. homophobia has been used to refer to heterosexism.) As a staff, we’ve been intentionally moving away from using words like “transphobic,” “homophobic,” and “biphobic” because they inaccurately describe systems of oppression as irrational fears, and, for some people, phobias are a very distressing part of their lived experience and co-opting this language is disrespectful to their experiences and perpetuates ableism.  

Passing – [ pas-ing, pah-sing ] 1 adj. & verb: trans* people being accepted as, or able to “pass for,” a member of their self-identified gender identity (regardless of sex assigned at birth) without being identified as trans*.  2 adj.: an LGB/queer individual who is believed to be or perceived as straight.

PGPs abbr.: preferred gender pronouns. Often used during introductions, becoming more common as a standard practice. Many suggest removing the “preferred,” because it indicates flexibility and/or the power for the speaker to decide which pronouns to use for someone else.

Pink Tax – [ pingk taks ] noun: Often, products marketed to women cost more than the same ones for men. This gender-based price discrepancy is known as the pink tax.

Pinkwashing or Pink Washing – [ pingk-wosh-ing, pingk-waw-shing ] noun: See article: is a term used by feminist theorists to describe the action of using queer rights to distract from violence or oppression by a country, government, or organization. In the context of LGBT rights, it is used to describe a variety of marketing and political strategies aimed at promoting products, countries, people, or entities through an appeal to gay-friendliness, in order to be perceived as progressive, modern and tolerant normally without substance.

Polyamory / Polyamorous – [ pol-ee-am-er-ee ] [ pol-ee-am-er-uhs ] noun: refers to the practice of, desire for, or orientation toward having ethical, honest, and consensual non-monogamous relationships (i.e. relationships that may include multiple partners). Often shortened to “poly.”

Polycule[pol-ee-kyool] noun.: in the polyamory and BDSM communities, is a word that refers to all the people in a network of non-monogamous relationships (not being committed to one person at a time). Polycule can also refer to diagrams of these relationship networks.

Polysexual – [ pol-ee-sek-shoo-uh l] adj.: People who have a romantic, sexual, or affectional desire for more than one gender. Not to be confused with polyamory (above). Has some overlap with bisexuality and pansexuality.

Positionality – [puh-zish-uhnal-i-tee] noun: is the social and political context that creates your identity in terms of race, class, gender, sexuality, and ability status. Positionality also describes how your identity influences, and potentially biases, your understanding of and outlook on the world.

Privilege – [ privuh-lij, priv-lij ] noun: a set of unearned benefits given to people who fit into a specific social group.  The concept has roots in WEB DuBois’ work on “psychological wage” and white people’s feelings of superiority over Black people.  Peggy McIntosh wrote about privilege as a white woman and developed an inventory of unearned privileges that she experienced in daily life because of her whiteness.

Pronouns – proh-noun ] noun in grammar: Linguistic tools used to refer to someone in the third person.  Examples are they/them/theirs, ze/hir/hirs, she/her/hers, he/him/his.  In English and some other languages, pronouns have been tied to gender and are a common site of misgendering (attributing a gender to someone that is incorrect.)

Proxvir – [proks-veer] adj.: is a gender created on Tumblr. It’s similar to boy and isn’t connected to the binary, standing by itself. It can be encapsulated in the phrases “boyish, but not boy” and “masculine, but not male.”

Quoisexual – [kwa-sek-shoo-uh l] adj.: a sexual orientation on the asexuality spectrum. It can refer to a person who doesn’t relate to or understand experiences or concepts of sexual attraction and orientation. It can also refer to someone who feels confused about their own feelings of sexual attraction and orientation.

Queer 1 adj.: an umbrella term to describe individuals who don’t identify as straight and/or cisgender. 2 noun: a slur used to refer to someone who isn’t straight and/or cisgender. Due to its historical use as a derogatory term, and how it is still used as a slur many communities, it is not embraced or used by all LGBTQ people. The term “queer” can often be used interchangeably with LGBTQ (e.g., “queer people” instead of “LGBTQ people”).

Questioningverb, adj.: an individual who or time when someone is unsure about or exploring their own sexual orientation or gender identity.Quoisexual is a sexual orientation on the asexuality spectrum. It can refer to a person who doesn’t relate to or understand experiences or concepts of sexual attraction and orientation. It can also refer to someone who feels confusion about their own feelings of sexual attraction and orientation.

QPOC / QTPOC – abbr.: initialisms that stand for queer people of color and queer and/or trans people of color.

Race – A social construct that divides people into distinct groups based on characteristics such as physical appearance, ancestral heritage, cultural affiliation, cultural history, ethnic classification, based on the social, economic, and political context of a society at a given period of time. (Racial Equity Resource Guide)

Racism – The systematic subordination of people from marginalized racial groups based on their physical appearance, ethnic or ancestral history, or cultural affiliation. Racism is considered a deeply pervasive, systemic issue perpetuated by members of the privileged racial group holding dominant social power over others. Discrimination, prejudice, or xenophobia may be more accurate terms for describing individual acts of oppression. While these individual acts likely stem from systemic racism, at the individual level the power dynamics that enable racism are not at play in the same way.

Religion – A personal or institutionalized system of beliefs and practices concerning the cause, nature, and purpose of the universe, often grounded in belief in and reverence for some supernatural power or powers; often involves devotional and ritual observances and contains a moral code governing the conduct of human affairs.

Romantic attractionnoun: a capacity that evokes the want to engage in romantic intimate behavior (e.g., dating, relationships, marriage), experienced in varying degrees (from little-to-none, to intense). Often conflated with sexual attraction, emotional attraction, and/or spiritual attraction.

Romantic Orientation – Romantic Orientation is attraction or non-attraction to other people characterized by the expression or non-expression of love.  Romantic orientation can be fluid and people use a variety of labels to describe their romantic orientation. See also Orientation.

Same-gender loving (SGL) – [seym jen-der luhv-ing] or [es-jee-el] adj.: sometimes used by some members of the African-American or Black community to express a non-straight sexual orientation without relying on terms and symbols of European descent.

Sex – a medically constructed categorization. Sex is often assigned based on the appearance of the genitalia, either in ultrasound or at birth.

Sexism – The cultural, institutional, and individual set of beliefs and practices that privilege men, subordinate women, and devalue ways of being that are associated with women.

Sex assigned at birth (SAAB)abbr.: a phrase used to intentionally recognize a person’s assigned sex (not gender identity). Sometimes called “designated sex at birth” (DSAB) or “sex coercively assigned at birth” (SCAB), or specifically used as “assigned male at birth” (AMAB) or “assigned female at birth” (AFAB): Jenny was assigned male at birth, but identifies as a woman.

Sexual attractionnoun: a capacity that evokes the want to engage in physically intimate behavior (e.g., kissing, touching, intercourse), experienced in varying degrees (from little-to-none to intense). Often conflated with romantic attraction, emotional attraction, and/or spiritual attraction.

Sexuality:  The components of a person that include their biological sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, sexual practices, etc.

Sexual orientation noun: the type of sexual, romantic, emotional/spiritual attraction one has the capacity to feel for some others, generally labeled based on the gender relationship between the person and the people they are attracted to. Often confused with sexual preference.

Sexual preferencenoun: the types of sexual intercourse, stimulation, and gratification one likes to receive and participate in. Generally, when this term is used, it is being mistakenly interchanged with “sexual orientation,” creating an illusion that one has a choice (or “preference”) in who they are attracted to.

Sex reassignment surgery (SRS)noun: used by some medical professionals to refer to a group of surgical options that alter a person’s biological sex. “Gender confirmation surgery” is considered by many to be a more affirming term. In most cases, one or multiple surgeries are required to achieve legal recognition of gender variance. Some refer to different surgical procedures as “top” surgery and “bottom” surgery to discuss what type of surgery they are having without having to be more explicit.

Sizeism – The pervasive system of discrimination and exclusion that oppresses people who have bodies that society has labeled as “overweight,” as well as people of short stature. Hxstorically speaking, fat people’s bodies have been labeled as unhealthy, undesirable, and lazy; this fails to complicate narratives around health and healthy living. This form of oppression has been referred to as fatphobia. 

Skoliosexual – [skoh-lee-oh-sex-shoo-uh l] adj.: being primarily sexually, romantically and/or emotionally attracted to some genderqueer, transgender, transsexual, and/or non-binary people.

Social Identities – Social identity groups are based on the physical, social, and mental characteristics of individuals. They are sometimes obvious and clear, sometimes not obvious and unclear, often self-claimed and frequently ascribed by others.

Socialization – The process by which societal norms influence a number of aspects that frame how members of a community live – including how they might think, behave, and hold certain values. Socialization can reinforce assumptions or expectations that give power to systems of oppression.

Social Justice – A goal and a process in which the distribution of resources is equitable and all members are physically and psychologically safe and secure.  Begins with an acknowledgement that oppression and inequity exist and must be actively dismantled on all levels. (Adams, Bell, & Griffin.)

Socioeconomic Class – Social group membership based on a combination of factors including income, education level, occupation, and social status in the community, such as contacts within the community, group associations, and the community’s perception of the family or individual.

SOGIE – An acronym that stands for Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Expression. Is used by some in a similar way to the umbrella acronym: LGBTQIA.

Spectrum –  a range or sliding scale. Aspects of one’s identity like sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression exist on a spectrum. For example, with sexual orientation, the attraction to men, women, or someone of another gender all exist on separate spectrums. Someone might feel a little attracted to men, very much attracted to women, and moderate attraction to people outside this binary. Please also see the Gender Unicorn to learn more about these aspects of identity.

Spiritual attractionnoun: a capacity that evokes the want to engage in intimate behavior based on one’s experience with, interpretation of, or belief in the supernatural (e.g., religious teachings, messages from a deity), experienced in varying degrees (from little-to-none, to intense). Often conflated with sexual attraction, romantic attraction, and/or emotional attraction.

Spirituality – Having to do with deep feelings and convictions, including a person’s sense of peace, purpose, connection to others, and understanding of the meaning and value of life; may or may not be associated with a particular set of beliefs or practices.

Stealth adj.: a trans person who is not “out” as trans, and is perceived/known by others as cisgender.

Stereotype – A generalization applied to every person in a cultural group; a fixed conception of a group without allowing for individuality. When we believe our stereotypes, we tend to ignore characteristics that don’t conform to our stereotype, rationalize what we see to fit our stereotype, see those who do not conform as “exceptions,” and find ways to create the expected characteristics.

Straight adj.: a person primarily emotionally, physically, and/or sexually attracted to some people who are not their same-sex/gender. A more colloquial term for the word heterosexual.

Stud – noun: most commonly used to indicate a Black/African-American and/or Latina, masculine, lesbian/queer woman. Also known as ‘butch’ or ‘aggressive’

T-girl – [ tee-gurl ] adj.: a term for a transgender girl or woman. While some in the LGBTQ community embrace the term, others find it offensive.

TERF – abbr.: Transgener Exclusionary Radical Feminist/Feminism, so people fighting for women’s rights while deliberately excluding persons of trans experience.

TGNCabbr.: TGNC is Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming (sometimes you’ll see “NB” added for non-binary)

Third gendernoun: for a person who does not identify with either man or woman, but identifies with another gender. This gender category is used by societies that recognize three or more genders, both contemporary and historic, and is also a conceptual term meaning different things to different people who use it, as a way to move beyond the gender binary.

Top surgerynoun: this term refers to surgery for the construction of a male-type chest or breast augmentation for a female-type chest.

Transadj.: an umbrella term covering a range of identities that transgress socially-defined gender norms. Trans with an asterisk is often used in written forms (not spoken) to indicate that you are referring to the larger group nature of the term, and specifically including non-binary identities, as well as transgender men (transmen) and transgender women (transwomen).

Trans man – A person may choose to identify this way to capture their gender identity as well as their lived experience as a transgender person.  

Trans woman – A person may choose to identify this way to capture their gender identity as well as their lived experience as a transgender person.  

Transman/transwomannoun: a man/woman who was not assigned that gender via sex at birth, and transitioned (socially, medically, and/or legally) from that assignment to their gender identity, signified by the second part of the term (i.e., -man, -woman). Also referred to as men and women (though some/many trans people prefer to keep the prefix “trans-” in their identity label).

Transgender 1 adj.: a gender description for someone who has transitioned (or is transitioning) from living as one gender to another. 2 adj.: an umbrella term for anyone whose sex assigned at birth and gender identity do not correspond in an expected way (e.g., someone who was assigned male at birth, but does not identify as a man).

Transition/transitioning noun; verb: referring to the process of a transgender person changing aspects of themselves (e.g., their appearance, name, pronouns, or making physical changes to their body) to be more congruent with the gender they know themselves to be (as opposed to the gender they lived as pre-transitioning).

Transphobianoun: the fear of, discrimination against, or hatred of trans* people, the trans* community, or gender ambiguity. Transphobia can be seen within the queer community, as well as in general society. Transphobic – adj. : a word used to describe an individual who harbors some elements of this range of negative attitudes, thoughts, intents, towards trans* people.

Transsexualnoun & adj.; a person who identifies psychologically as a gender/sex other than the one to which they were assigned at birth. Transsexuals often wish to transform their bodies hormonally and surgically to match their inner sense of gender/sex.

Transvestitenoun: a person who dresses as the binary opposite gender expression (“cross-dresses”) for many reasons, including relaxation, fun, and sexual gratification (often called a “cross-dresser,” and should not be confused with transsexual).

Twink – adj.: is gay slang for a young man in his late teens to early twenties whose traits may include: general physical attractiveness; little to no body or facial hair; a slim to average build; and a youthful appearance

Two-spiritnoun: is an umbrella term traditionally within Native American communities to recognize individuals who possess qualities or fulfill roles of both feminine and masculine genders.

Undocumented – People are who are born outside of the country to which they immigrated, who do not have documentation that grants legal rights related to residency and/or citizenship.

Ursula: Some lesbians, particularly butch dykes, also participate in Bear culture referring to themselves with the distinct label Ursula.

White feminism – [wahyt fem-uh-niz-uh m] adj.: the label given to feminist efforts and actions that uplift white women but that exclude or otherwise fail to address issues faced by minority groups, especially women of color and LGBTQ women.

Womxn – some womxn spell the word with an “x” as a form of empowerment to move away from the “men” in the “traditional” spelling of women.

Womyn – [wim-in] an alternative way of spelling women, used by some feminists to avoid the perceived sexism in the suffix “-men”.

Ze – / zir/ “zee”, “zerr” or “zeer”/ – alternate pronouns that are gender neutral and preferred by some trans* people. They replace “he” and “she” and “his” and “hers” respectively. Alternatively some people who are not comfortable/do not embrace he/she use the plural pronoun “they/their” as a gender neutral singular pronoun.

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AJ Mizes: 80% of Jobs are Filled Through Connections

In this episode of OutBüro Voices featuring LGBTQ professionals, entrepreneurs, and community leaders from around the world, host Dennis Velco chats with AJ Mizes a career coach, leadership coach, and HR consultant.   

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A.J. is a talent and human potential aficionado with over a decade of experience within Career Coaching and Human Resources–and has been featured in NBC, CBS, FOX, The International Business Times, and Yahoo! News.  Most recently, though, AJ left Facebook as a Global HR Leader where he supported an international team and launched many innovative leadership programs under his guidance–that are still in full swing at Facebook today.  He’s supported global teams of over 3,000 people and currently serves as the CEO of The Human Reach–a human potential institute guiding high-achieving professionals to land their dream careers in record time and coaching silicon valley leaders to be thoughtful, effective leaders.  His career stems from a foundation in training and development at KSL Capital, where he coached leaders on how to select, coach, and retain top talent at some of the world’s most prestigious luxury resort properties.  A.J. also served as a leader @ Premier Staffing where he worked alongside well-known tech giants in organizing talent strategy and recruiting tactics.  Before Facebook, AJ was the Vice President of Talent and Engagement at Sungevity—the world’s leading platform technology for residential solar—where he led an HR team that spanned across the United States.   

To connect with AJ find him on OutBüro here. https://outburo.com/profile/ajmizes/ 

Join me and AJ on OutBüro, the LGBTQ professional and entrepreneur online community network for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, allies and our employers who support LGBTQ welcoming workplace equality focused benefits, policies, and business practices.  https://www.OutBuro.com 

Would you like to be featured like this? Contact the host Dennis Velco.  https://outburo.com/profile/dennisvelco/

OutBuro Voices 1-36 Brison Downing

Brison Downing: Seeking Parents of Transgender Persons for Study

In this episode of OutBüro Voices featuring LGBTQ professionals, entrepreneurs, and community leaders from around the world, host Dennis Velco chats with Ph.D. candidate Brison “Scholar Lee” Downing about his thesis project.

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Downing, a person of transgender experience himself knows all too well the adjustments, strains, and struggles family members can often experience when a child or loved one comes out as transgender and during the transitioning experience. As Downing expresses, family, loved ones, and friends are not the persons directly going through the physical changes, yet they too are going through the transition often experiencing emotions of loss of a loved one.

These are normal feelings he explains. He explains there is a limited number of studies to date, yet the participant pool has been predominately US Caucasian families. Downing’s study is to broaden the current research study pool striving to include underrepresented minority families. He states that to better serve all we need the perspective that different races, ethnically and cultural backgrounds bring to the learning and sharing conversations.

Downing’s goal is to publish his findings in hopes to be a resource for all parents, loved ones, and family members to cope with the emotions and retain as well as grow stronger loving relationships.

Connect with Scott on OutBüro at https://www.outburo.com/profile/brisondowning/

Join Brison on OutBüro, the LGBTQ professional and entrepreneur online community network for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, allies and our employers who support LGBTQ welcoming workplace equality focused benefits, policies, and business practices. https://www.OutBuro.com

Would you like to be featured like this? Contact the host Dennis Velco. https://www.outburo.com/profile/dennisvelco/

97% of US LGBTQ Students Experience Homophobia at School lgbt high school college university gay lesbian bisexual transgender queer professional

97% of US LGBTQ Students Experience Homophobia at School

GLSEN, a US national LGBT+ education advocacy group completed a research study recently and found that an astounding near 97% of lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender students aged between 13 and 21 reported hearing disparaging comments about their sexuality or gender identity while at school. The GLSEN report, which surveyed students in all 50 U.S. states as well as the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, and Guam, found homophobia was rife within educational establishments.

Almost 97% of respondents stated that they had heard the phrase “no homo” at school, while more than 95% reported hearing homophobic terms such as “dyke” and “faggot”. About 69% said they had experienced verbal harassment because of their sexual orientation, while just under 57% said they had also been called names or threatened because of their gender expression. Just under 10% reported the same experiences due to their gender expression, it added. Comments such as “that’s so gay” and “no homo” are regularly stated on playgrounds, in the cafeterias, and around school campuses. Almost 92% said the remarks had made them feel “distressed”, said the 2019 National School Climate Survey, which surveyed 16,700 LGBT+ students between April and August last year. 11% of LGBT+ students said they had been physically assaulted, or “punched, kicked (or) injured with a weapon” because of their sexuality, the report noted.

Aiden Cloud, a 17-year-old student who identifies as genderqueer and attends at a small, conservative private school in Nashville, Tennessee stated, “At my school, it’s very taboo for teachers especially to talk about LGBT issues. Even though there are a lot of queer students at my school – just as there are at any school – there’s a very big lack of visibility. It feels very isolating.”

“This is a very significant wake-up call about how the progress we’ve won is directly under attack,” said Eliza Byard, the executive director of GLSEN, formerly the Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network.

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OutBuro Voices 1-19 Saraounia Mboka-Boyer Empowering LGBTQ NGOs in Africa lgbt professional gay lesbian bisexual transgender health rights nonprofits

Saraounia Mboka-Boyer: Empowering LGBTQ NGOs in Africa

In this episode of OutBüro Voices featuring LGBTQ professionals, entrepreneurs, and community leaders from around the world, host Dennis Velco chats with Saraounia Mboka-Boyer, a Senior Capacity Development and Inclusion Specialist at Pact.

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We’d love your text comments at the bottom of each show episode page asking questions of me, our guests, and interacting with other commenters.

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Saraounia is a bilingual organizational change management and development specialist focusing on the intersections of Capacity Development/Building, sustainability, Gender equity, and Climate Change for systems strengthening in an international development context(s). In our discussion, she explains what Capacity Development is and how improving the basic operational skills can improve an organization’s chances of gaining grants or other funding so they may work on their core mission. Marginalized communities include the gay (homosexual), lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer populations within the many countries Pact operates.

  • 01:10 Saraounia introduces her international exposure due to parents work with the #UnitedNations
  • 02:45 Attended her first HIV/AIDS workshop at ages 6 accompanying her father which began to shape her foundation
  • 04:00 She explains what capacity development is and how she applies that with organizations
  • 05:20 My recap to validate understanding
  • 07:10 Focuses on the LGBTQ communities, meeting them where they are on skills and helping them increase their skills and connect with resources
  • 17:00 Discussion on how LGBTQ non-profit opportunities to partner, challenges to think how your organization might partner with others
  • 26:15 Join OutBüro (https://www.OutBuro.com)and create/join for your non-profit, region or industry

Pact (https://www.pactworld.org/) is a nonprofit international development organization founded in 1971, Pact works on the ground in nearly 40 countries to improve the lives of those who are challenged by poverty and marginalization. They work in many areas including HIV/AIDS care and prevention. When called upon, they openly work with LGBTQ focused organizations based in the regions they operate in needing their assistance. They welcome partnerships to further create impactful change. In her role at Pact, she assists non-profit NGOs primarily within the countries of Liberia, Congo, South Africa, Indonesia, and Myanmar.

To connect with Saraounia find her on OutBüro here. https://www.outburo.com/profile/saouniasmb/

Join me and Saraounia on OutBüro, the LGBTQ professional and entrepreneur online community network for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, allies and our employers who support LGBTQ welcoming workplace equality focused benefits, policies, and business practices. https://www.OutBuro.com

Would you like to be featured like this? Contact the host Dennis Velco. https://outburo.com/profile/dennisvelco/

To be out as lgbt or not on resume job searching gay lesbian bisexual trans professional online community OutBuro

Should You be OUT as LGBTQ on Your Resume/CV (2020)

When it’s time to update your resume/CV preparing for a job search, it can be tough to know if you should be out as LGBTQ on it. We don’t believe you will find anyone who would suggest putting “I’m queer – get used to it” in bold pink letter sprinkled with glitter on the top of your resume/CV.

So, should you come out on your resume?

No one can answer that question for you.  It is your life, your career, your sexuality, your gender identity, and therefore your choice rests squarely on your shoulders.  However, read on for insights to help you make an informed decision.

Many in the LGBTQ community disagree about what you should reveal on your resume/CV.  Some say to be out being your full and authentic self, while others argue that you should remain in the closet, grit your teeth to land the job and then slowly come out to co-workers as you get to know them individually.

Many people have acquired significant volunteer and work experience from obviously LGTBQ-oriented organizations. Other people struggle with how transparent they should be on their resume or job application when asked about other interests. Knowing what to say, and how much to disclose to a complete stranger with the power to provide or decline a job offer can be cause for worry. It can often feel like living in the closet and being judged for who you are as a person.

How much experience is related?

Not much but it’s close to my heart

You are such a wonderful person for volunteering. If your past experience related to LGBTQ non-profits/NGOs is not really central to the job you are applying for, we’d recommend completely leaving it off your resume/CV. It’s not hiding your sexuality or gender identity, it is just not pertinent. This even includes leaving it out of your resume/CV hobbies/extra activities. If you get a sense during the interview process that the employer and interviewers are LGBTQ friendly you can always bring it up in the course of dialog as appropriate.

Just a bit but it’s important

If some of your experience was acquired from paid or volunteering for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer non-profits/NGOs no matter if you are LGBTQ a straight ally you might start to wonder if you should put that experience on your resume.  This effectively would out you as LGBTQ whether you are LGBTQ or a community ally. Additionally, as you’ll learn below even just the perception of being LGBTQ real or perceived can potentially impact your ability to be hired, promoted and even the salary offered. 

Major part of my career

If all your experience is from paid or volunteering at LGBTQ organizations, then it’s pretty clear you have no choice. You have to list the experiences.  But you still need to be aware of the issues you may face and be prepared to research employers to find the right match and put your best foot forward with the best employers no matter the size or location of the employer.  

If you have worked primarily for LGBTQ or other non-profits/NGOs it can also be difficult to break into the for-profit sector. I have heard of people attempting to do make this transition and being told, “Your qualifications are outstanding, however, you aren’t a right fit for this company we are about making money not helping people/the environment/animals.” – true story. So if your work experience has been 50%+ with a non-profit organization no matter the focus LGBTQ or not, be prepared to address this disqualifying mindset proactively in your cover letter and in the every interview conversation if you get that far.

LGBTQ workplace policies are good yet not a 100% guarantee

Reality is even if an employer boasts being a welcoming LGBTQ workplace with LGBT friendly policies and benefits, there are many people involved in the resume/cv review and interview process.  Depending on the size of the employer, that may be a few people or in best case scenario it will be a review committee to reduce the chances of one person’s learned prejudices and ignorance to discriminate and disqualify you based on you being LGBT.  In any case, it still can be risky. You want to list all your great experience and qualifications to land that new job yet you are also putting trust in the employer company/organization and the individuals in the hiring process.

At what point should I come “out” in the workplace?

It is important to know that you do NOT have to disclose your sexual orientation or gender identity at any point in the resume/cv submission, job application or interview process. This decision is entirely up to you and how comfortable you feel disclosing your sexual orientation, sex, or gender expression. If you do choose to disclose, there are generally three opportunities to “come out” to an employer?

  • On your resume
  • In an interview
  • After you start working for the organization

Many believe that no job is so great that it’s worth hiding who you are and selling yourself short by leaving out all the organizations you volunteered time with, just-just to hide your sexual identity. That volunteer work could have provided many skills and demonstrate your community involvement beyond the workplace showing a well-rounded individual with character.

Some feel that it is more important to get the job first, and then come out after people get to know you. “I’m here. I’m queer. I’m in the next cubicle” approach.

Others strive for a middle ground in where they list their LGBT activities on their resumes but don’t draw attention to it. They might list PFLG, HRC or NGLCC without going into additional details or spelling out the acronym. They might list the abbreviation of a student campus LGBT group and that they were the vice president such as Berkely LGSA Vice President instead of Berkely Lesbian & Gay Student Alliance Vice President. If asked about the entry it’s an opportunity for discussion to expand upon it in person versus potentially being tossed way by someone along the candidate review path who might hold prejudices. such as “vice president of gay campus group.” The rest, says Woog, is left to the interviewer. If she says, “The Rainbow Alliance –- tell me more about that,” it’s an opportunity to expand on it and judge her reaction.

Still, others hold firm that it is inappropriate to come out on one’s resume as it is to mark down one’s religious or political affiliations. We suggest talking with your both LGBT and straight close friends and family who also have a history of volunteer and community work.

As LGBTQ professionals we cannot live in a vacuum and our straight college have no problem listing their volunteer and community activities that might hint at their heterosexuality. It’s accepted.

At OutBüro we believe a resume should be honest and comprehensive. If a person has done work with GLAAD or Lambda Legal for example – and the reader even knows what these things are – certain presumptions can be made or not. We know many straight people who work at LGBTQ organizations too. Putting your volunteer work in the LGBTQ community on your resume is no different than others who may indicate they are a deacon in the church or a Hebrew school teacher on the weekends.

Why should you hide what you value and has contributed to your life, character, your local community and the community at large? It’s unfortunate that all companies do not have sexual orientation and gender identity non-discrimination policies. Luckily many companies and organizations do

Questions to ask

  • Is the company you are interested in an LGBTQ workplace friendly employer?
  • Do you feel comfortable disclosing that you are currently or have in your past held a paid positions or volunteered for an LGBT community organization?
  • Do you include previous work experiences (internships, etc.) that occurred at an LGBT advocacy organization(s)?
  • Is that current or past experience relevant to the job you are applying for?
  • How do you list your achievements from an LGBT organization on your resume?
  • Do you list it as for example an LGBT youth organization or simply a youth organization and if asked which one in the interview process disclose it if you feel comfortable doing so at that time?

Questions you can ask an employer in an interview if their employer website does not specifically state it:

  • Would you say that your company has a diverse employee base?
  • Do you offer domestic partner benefits and or other LGBT related benefits and policies? (if not clearly stated on their website)
  • Does your company/organization have an LGBTQ employee resource support or social group?

Additional considerations for transgender job seekers

Is it OK to use my chosen name on a resume and cover letters are not legal documents? You are not required to list your legal name on either document.

Let’s say your legal name is Stephanie Smith and your chosen name is Darrel Smith. You might consider listing your name as S. Darrel Smith on the resume and cover letter.

Will I have to use my legal name during the Job Search

Unless you have made legal arrangements to change your name, unfortunately, you will need to provide your legal name for the actual job application, background checks, social security documents, and insurance forms. However, most organizations will allow you to use your preferred name for company contact information, email, and phone directory. Human resource professionals are bound by confidentiality and can be a good source of information.

When it comes to dressing for an interview, it is important that you present yourself in a manner that is consistent with the position for which you are applying. Dress professionally for the gender for which you wish to be seen as. This can also help your employer understand which pronouns you wish to use.

The world has changed but not enough

A recent study conducted by the University of Surry demonstrates that discrimination in the hiring process still exists.  In that study the presented the participants with headshot images with the backgrounds removed along with voice samples.  The found that just based on those two bits of information that the participants indicated they were less likely to hire the person and if they did hire them the candidate would be offered less money for the same job with the same skills as someone they perceived as heterosexual.  Additionally, the participants indicated if the candidate already worked for the employer, they would likely be passed over for promotion preferring to promote a heterosexual.

According to a 2013 Queer in STEM study (science, technology, engineering, and math) found that more than 40% of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer people are not out as LGBTQ in the workplace.

One-third of out American physicists have been told to stay in the closet to continue their career as found in the 2014 Factors Impacting The Academic Climate study.  Half of the transgender or gender non-conforming physicists were harassed in academia (2015 American Physical Society survey).

In the United States laws to protect LGBTQ workers is still spotty today leaving LGBTQ citizens open to blatant discrimination and harassment. This leads to the findings that in the United States alone, nearly 72% of LGBTQ employees suffer mental stress from a workplace that is not LGBTQ friendly or welcoming.

Regardless of actual sexual orientation, another study found that men who do not conform to the stereotypical masculine norm they are penalized by being left out, not promoted and seen as weak.  When women behave in ways that don’t fit their gender stereotype they are viewed as less likable and ultimately less hirable.

Studies find benefits to creating an LGBTQ inclusive workplace

All the while other studies have demonstrated that having LGBTQ in management positions benefits the company/organization.   Further many studies have been done the clearly indicate that companies/organization that create an LGBTQ inclusive workplace benefit from increased productivity, increase employee happiness, increased customer satisfaction and increased revenue.  It’s a win-win-win opportunity for employers who adopt LGBTQ inclusive policies, benefits, and business practices.

Know the LGBTQ legal protections where you live

No matter how you decide to proceed regarding your sexual orientation on your resume, you should do your homework on the employer’s LGBTQ workplace equality you before submitting your application.

Do research on the company’s website as well as other websites listing the company is important to know as much about them and their LGBTQ stance as possible. Know what legal protections are in place in your city, county, state, and country.

Network with other LGBT professionals of all levels

One of the best ways to get the inside scoop on an employer’s workplace LGBT friendliness is to connect with and communicate with an LGBT employee who currently or recently worked there. Don’t know anyone? No problem. Join the OutBüro on the LinkedIn LGBT professional networking group. It was the first and remains the largest LGBT+ professional networking group on LinkedIn with currently over 46,000 global members.

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Like the OutBüro Facebook page and message others who like it. We’ll be considering starting an OutBüro on Facebook group shortly and then you’ll be right there ready to jump in.

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LGBTQ employer ratings/reviews

The main focus of OutBüro is to be a growing resource for LGBTQ job seekers to use the site to research LGBTQ inclusive and friendly potential employers. 

Add LGBTQ Employer Listing Ratings Reviews OutBuro - GBLT Employees Rate Reviews Company Employee Branding - Corporate Workplace Equality Gay Lesbian Queer Diversity Inclusion

Any company/organization

Any size.

Any location in the world

Your voice matters

It needs people just like you to participate. It’s fairly new and we would appreciate you taking a few moments to add reviews/rating of your current and recent past employers. It’s at no cost to you as an employee and it’s anonymous. Your review/rating will help other LGBTQ job seekers in the future during their job hunt company/organization research.

Search to see if your current or recent past employer(s) are present already in the system. If not, you may add it with limited features and then review/rate them.

Check out the below article and user guides to get started:

In the United States

HRC

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If interested in a job at a US Fortune 1000 level company one source is the HRC Corporate Equality Index. This organization and report have been instrumental in moving large companies forward in creating LGBTQ workplace equality. It is however as mentioned limited only to US Fortune 1000. It is also self-reported by those company HR departments with no employee input to our knowledge and definitely, no direct employee feedback on the actual workplace equality and general work culture.

Although not all, OutBüro has heard personally from many LGBT employees over the past few years that once their employer achieved the coveted 100% HRC Corporate Equality Index score that management backs off and the internal efforts dwindle to barely an acceptable level at best. It is awesome and we applaud HRC and all organizations who have achieved and maintain a 100% score. This report is but one view of the employer’s benefits, policies, business practices, and the potential of an LGBT friendly workplace environment. Don’t rely on it as your only.

If outside the United States

As of the updating of this LGBT employee resource article, OutBüro is only aware of one other corporate equality scoring report.

If you are aware of other studies and reports please contact us with a URL to the site so that we may include it within this article and other resource guides on the OutBüro site.

Rainbow Tick

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The Rainbow Tick is a New Zealand national accreditation program for organizations that are committed to safe and inclusive practice, and service delivery for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex (LGBTI) people. Organizations wishing to receive a Rainbow Tick are required to undergo accreditation against the Rainbow Tick Standards, owned and developed by Rainbow Health Victoria (formerly GLHV).

Stonewall UK Workplace Equality Index

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Participating employers demonstrate their work in 10 areas of employment policy and practice. Staff from across the organization also complete an anonymous survey about their experiences of diversity and inclusion at work.

Organizations then receive their scores, enabling them to understand what’s going well and where they need to focus their efforts, as well as see how they’ve performed in comparison with their sector and region. The 100 best-performing organizations are celebrated publicly.

Stonewall Diversity Champions benefit from in-depth, tailored feedback on their submission. 

Free & Equal – United Nations

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Violence and discrimination against lesbian, gay, bi, trans and intersex (LGBTI) people cannot be ended by governments alone. Businesses can foster diversity and promote a culture of respect and equality both in the workplace and in the communities where they and their business partners operate. 

The United Nations is calling on companies all over the world – big and small, local and multinational – to help move the dial in the direction of greater equality for LGBTI people.

We know from experience that every time discrimination is diminished, everyone benefits. 

Conclusion

It’s your life, your sexuality, your gender identity, and your career. Only you can make the choice on how out to be on your resume/CV in your new career job search and in the workplace. It’s your choice.

Developing Leadership Skills for Work and Life Phil Bohlender Auther Mentor Coach Speaker TEDx Organizer Non-profit leader lgbt entrepreneur gay professional business owner Video Interview Podcast

Developing Leadership Skills for Work and Life – Phil Bohlender

In this episode of OutBüro Voices featuring LGBTQ professionals, entrepreneurs, and community leaders from around the world, host Dennis Velco chats with Phil Bohlender is an author, #LGBT #entrepreneur, and a unique thinker on #leadership.

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7 ESSENTIAL TRAITS OF LEADERS Developing Your Unique Leadership Style - Phil Bohlender LGBT entrepreneur author coach

Every day is a good day to focus on developing your leadership skills. However as we are in unprecedented recent times with the global COVID pandemic, if you choose, it is a fabulous time to reflect on your personal, professional, career, and/or entrepreneur ambitions through honing your leadership skills. We discuss the opportunity to adapt your business or launch a startup based on the new environmental conditions that COVID-19 has brought about. Change, adapt and grow or be like past iconic brands who didn’t and are no longer around. Be the new startup disruptor seizing new opportunities.

Phil Bohlender on OutBüro >

https://www.outburo.com/profile/philbohlender/

Video Timestamp Discussion

  • 2:00 Phil’s Came Professionally Out in 1982
  • 5:50 Book description – 7 Essential Traits of Leaders (Buy on Amazon: https://amzn.to/2O7vV0M)
  • 7:00 Book description – 7 Essential Traits of Coaches (Buy on Amazon: https://amzn.to/31TFuIR)
  • 15:00 Leadership in parenting, your relationships and all aspects of your everyday life
  • 19:20 Impact of COVID on Phil’s business and activities
  • 21:00 Changing what we do and how we do it due to COVID
  • 23:00 Leadership of politicians through a COVID lense – balancing people and profit
  • 25:45 COVID is a massive opportunity to create and adapt personally and as a business
  • 27:00 Analysing your competitors – do a SWOT – Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats
  • 29:20 Adapting your business marketing due to COVID predominantly online
  • 33:15 Phil serves on TEDx San Antonio discusses affects on this year’s plan events due to COVID
  • 36:00 Change can become normalized if embraced
  • 38:40 Reflecting on history can inspire innovation future
  • 41:15 Sgt Harry Tucker’s Leadership Lesson – Take responsibility, action, and communicate.
  • 45:00 Knowing your customers and taking one for the team
  • 56:30 Leadership and intuition

Phil Bohlender is an LGBT author, entrepreneur and a unique thinker on leadership. In our casual conversation, Phil states his book may be read cover to cover in just two hours and has reflective exercises at the end of each chapter. It may be kept close at hand to be a continual reference as you experience different situations. We discuss how leadership activities happen in all areas of your life from personal interactions with a spouse/life partner, parenting, family relations, and even friendships. Improving leadership skills is for all ages from teens in school, Young adults in college and starting there careers, and adults for personal and professional growth. Maybe you want to be a leader in a non-profit or step up influence at work. The skills Phil teaches are easy to grasp and put to practical use. For very early in his professional career,

Phil has been out as a gay professional. He is an LGBT author, entrepreneur, coach, consultant, and speaker. Further, grow your skills and grab Phil’s book on Coaching. Again the principles may be applied to nearly all your relationships. In our chat, we discussed some examples of leadership in our own past and current work as examples while having a laugh too. Phil is available for panel discussions, speaking engagement live or virtual as well as training/coaching individuals or groups.

Seed and Lead

7 ESSENTIAL TRAITS OF COACHES Developing Your Unique Coaching Style - Phil Bohlender LGBT entrepreneur author coach

Coaching is one of the ways High Performing Organizations differentiate themselves from others in their industry. As a result of partnering with an experienced coach; individuals and organizations are in a better position to develop stronger leaders, improve processes and increase profits. Organizations that work with coaches are better equipped to adapt to the changes that are inherent in every industry. Leaders have an accountability for delivering successful outcomes and must be educated, equipped and empowered to achieve them consistently. Companies looking for a high return on expectations as well as value, will achieve more success when working with skilled and competent coaches.

Seed and Leed on YouTube

Consulting allows organizations to access more successful strategies and tactical best practices. Organizations that focus on streamlined and more efficient processes, are more likely to be High Performing Organizations. The costs associated with processes are reduced when a consultant collaborates with the organization’s Subject Matter Experts to develop the new ways of getting work done for both their internal stakeholders and customers. The ROI for the coaching investment is achieved when the costs associated with the processes are reduced by eliminating the unnecessary steps and aligning the roles and responsibilities more clearly.

Phil is an experienced and energetic global leader with expertise in leadership development coaching and business process improvement consulting. His corporate career spanned more than 35 years working with 7 companies, in 2 industries on 4 continents. 5 of the companies Phil worked with are ranked in the Fortune 100 list. Phil brings his experience, expertise, and best practices to each engagement with his clients. As a result of his passion for learning and sharing his knowledge with others; he is a powerful and proficient coach and mentor, who is highly sought after by leaders and business owners.

To connect with Phil find him on OutBüro here. https://www.outburo.com/profile/philbohlender/

Join me and Phil on OutBüro, the LGBTQ professional and entrepreneur online community network for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, allies and our employers who support LGBTQ welcoming workplace equality focused benefits, policies, and business practices. https://www.OutBuro.com

Would you like to be featured like this? Contact the host Dennis Velco. https://outburo.com/profile/dennisvelco/

Conversation Auto Transcript

The below was created through voice to text recognition. We will strive to edit for accuracy as time permits. It may not be perfect. It is being provided for the hearing impaired to still enjoy the interview.

Unknown Speaker 0:04
Hello, this is Dennis Velco with OutBüro you’re listening to out bureau voices, the video interview and podcast interview new sessions with LGBT leaders, entrepreneurs and professionals around the globe. Today, I am so thrilled to be chatting with Bill bohlander. We have actually had numerous conversations on the telephone over the last year or so. And this is actually the first time that we’ve had a video dialogue. So we have a lot of history and looking forward to our conversation now. Welcome so much, Phil to the show. Thank you, Dennis. It’s

Unknown Speaker 0:47
a pleasure to be on your show and also to get to see you.

Unknown Speaker 0:51
Well, Leonor, hey, I it’s early. I’m having my coffee. I’ve got the lightnings going. So yes, a little bit of time. Up here. It’s all good. It’s

Unknown Speaker 1:01
all good.

Unknown Speaker 1:03
Yes. So So Phil, you know, of course, you know, because you and I have had numerous conversations, even there almost weekly for a while. And, you know, so I have a pretty good understanding, I believe, but and every time you come up with something new, that you’re working on that for our listeners and viewers out around the world, give us an overview for you know, five or seven minutes of your, your background. And then, you know, let’s lead up into what you are doing now. And I see you have a couple of your books on your background. Obviously check it out. So take it away, Phil, thank you.

Unknown Speaker 1:49
I’ve been coached well, right this way this way, I think. Well. So thank you. Again, it’s very thrilling to be here. So what I love about your platform is that it’s a professional platform. And so what I want to share with you is that in 1982, if we could go all the way back to January of 1982, and I won’t take you through every year individually, I started my first corporate position. It was at a fortune 100 company. And for for whatever reasons I had the wherewithal to come out in the first four months, and this is at a time when working in Texas, I could have been terminated just for coming out. There was massive anti LGBT energy going on. And so I started my career by coming out and I remained out for 35 years in my corporate career, and my corporate career spanned working for six fortune 100 companies. In the service industry, I went on to a family owned business in the manufacturing industry. I was fortunate to work on five continents in 20 countries and all the while developing This passion and proficiency around leadership, I felt very responsible as a leader, I felt very responsible for the people that I was working with, and also for the work that was entrusted to me. So lots of focus and lots of attention on developing as a leader. And what’s key to me about being a leader is this coaching and mentoring model. So it’s not the heavy stick and you know, coming at people in really harsh ways, but really about empowering them and asking them questions about how they want to lead and how they want to become bigger and better leaders. And then what happened was, it seemed as though the place to be the one who developed other leaders was in the places where there was the most chaos. And so what I loved was I kept getting called in to take operations and turn them upside down and put them back together because they were completely out of whack. One example was I took the job. And it was very interesting because all throughout the interview process, I kept asking them So what am I walking into? So what’s the inventory? What are some of the key issues that you want me to take on right away and get solved? They wouldn’t tell me they wouldn’t tell me they wouldn’t tell me. I’m a risk taker. I liked enough about the job that I took the job. And I moved my family, my partner at the time to another city in order to take on this job. When I went into this job in the first week, I asked for the reports around the inventory, the reports came in and they were stacked this high, and they were all across my credenza. I said, I just want the summary page, show me the summary page. So it’s a summary page Dennis, and it had the number 83 on it, and I said, I thought the standard was five. I said it is I said so the inventory is at 83 days and we need to get it to five or under. So there’s a whole story around how I got it the fiber under with the working around the leadership development and the business transformation. So 35 years really excited about what i what i did during that time. I will tell you that I’m risk taker and an adventure when it comes to my career. So I’m not afraid of ever doing anything that other people might walk away from. And it was interesting as I reflected having my own business over the last few years, um, maybe just maybe some of the jobs while I was qualified for them. There probably weren’t people out there as crazy as me to take them. So I got, I got to take on these jobs and literally turn things upside down, put them back together. So just a rich, rich, rich corpora

Unknown Speaker 5:31
e career. Awesome. Ok

Unknown Speaker 5:36
y. And so Hey, tell us about some of the books though that because you do have them right up in your background. So why don’t we jump into those? I know you and I could then spin off into lots of dialogues.

Unknown Speaker 5:48
xcellent. So what I’ll tell you about it, the first book, it’s on the top there. You can tell I’ve never done the weather. So the first book is called the seven essential traits of leaders And what came to me was that every leader must have a style. So it’s the thing around being intentional. And the thing about having, as we call it now a brand around your leadership. So the seven essential traits for leaders, for me, leaders is an acronym. And so each of those acronyms is a trait characteristic that you want to take into your leadership style. It’s, it’s what I modeled my leadership style around. So if not these seven, pick three or seven or some number that works for you. So I’ll just tease with the first one. The first one L is for listening. And what I know over and over again, is that being Lisp, being a listener is about being intentional. It’s about pausing and letting the other person in, you know, inviting the other person to share and speak. So that book is really exciting. And it’s gotten a lot of attention in terms of doing some speaking gigs, some workshops here locally and now of course, in the COVID environment. I’m delivering a program around that book in the virtual world. The coach’s book is the second of the books that I didn’t even know that I was going to write. And it’s really around being a coach within the leadership model. And so I’ll let you figure out what the coaches acronym are. And what’s interesting about it is it’s a really great compliment to the leadership. And I thought, Okay, I have one for one end of the book, and you know, the shelf and the other end of the book, so shelf rather. So now I have these bookends, and I’m done. And now you know, recently, I got this idea for writing a book called The seven essential traits of mentors, because at my age, I’m really stepping into being a mentor for other leaders. And so what I’m going to do is I’m going to offer those seven traits around how to be a mentor to others. And it doesn’t necessarily mean that you have to be my age in order to be a mentor. Certainly there are younger people who mentor me around technology on a regular basis and I’m really grateful for them. So really, so my books are really centered around leadership coaching and mentoring. Um, and, uh, the whole, the whole idea to it is be intentional as

Unknown Speaker 8:09
a leader. Awesome, very g

Unknown Speaker 8:12
od. And I pardon man, and I do like the, you know, you were always evolving. Yes, businesses are always evolving. You’re always evolving. Well, that’s well, no, let me take that back. Businesses are not always evolving. And if they don’t constantly evolve, what do they do? They go out of business. Yeah. Yeah. don’t adapt. You know, look, look at industry, look at businesses that we that were common household names just eight years ago, 10 years ago. Yes. And they’re nowhere now. Exactly. And, you know, like Barnes and Noble, for example. I mean, they’re there. Very few stores I think are even out there. Yeah. And as people, we have to do the same, right? Yeah. If If we don’t constantly take a learning, which is I personally like you love challenging situations and my corporate consulting, I was known as a paratrooper. So I would go into the worst accounts, and the worst accounts and where projects were not being delivered the consultants on it, you know, like, because at one point, I had 38 staff. And so you know, like, let’s say I and I was the founder of the company, so, but even before I became a business owner, I was known for that. So if I was working for a consulting firm, that had a project, and if I had any at all, not even domain experience On what was going on just pure project management? Yes, they would send me in. And so, so, but yes, so for, for me constantly learning is is one of the hallmarks, and constantly adapting. And so you’re, you know, started out with the leadership book and the coaching book and moving on to the mentorship book, I think is great. Now, would you recommend kind of reading them in that order? Or is there maybe now that you have three? Is there maybe a different order that you think makes sense for someone? Are they each and then and to themselves, you know, kind of their o

Unknown Speaker 10:39
n island? So that’s a really great question and one that I wouldn’t have thought of because of the fact that I only thought I was going to write the one book. Now I have to with the third one on its way, right. So if I were coaching, let’s say if I were leading coaching or mentoring someone and they asked me that question, likely what I would do is I would have them start with the leadership book, I firmly believe that everyone is a leader in their life. So they may have the formal title of it or they may not. However, I think being a leader is a universal. And so for me, I would have people read the leaders book first, and then follow it by the coaching because the coaching really gives the underpinning to the leadership model. Because when you’re a coach and the leadership role, you’re going to be more engaging, empowering, supportive, these kinds of things that really, they my experiences this, Dennis, that those things in your leadership model, then include coaching, bring out the best in others, people are more likely to do more for you. They’re more likely to do more for the organization, when their coach and coaching Of course, for me is around asking versus telling, and then opening the space for them to find their own solutions to it because people Let’s face it, people don’t want to be told what to do. They want to be asked for their opinions and valued. So first book leaders, second book coaches, and then when mentors comes out, by all means, buy it and read it. And what I’ll tell you is that these are very, very quick reads. These are not meant to be textbooks, they’re not meant to be, you know, long laborious reads. These are typically reads that can be done in under two hours. At the end of each chapter, there are a set of reflection questions as well as review. So it’s intended to have the reader do some application immediately thereafter. So not only do you read it, not only do you do the reflections at the end, but you put it somewhere close to you that you can pick it up when you want to look at something around, let’s say educating. So you’re in the middle of something that calls for you to educate, pull the book out, read the chapter, see what comes to you, either from the chapter or from your own thoughts, and then mov

Unknown Speaker 12:51
forward. Okay, so is that the

Unknown Speaker 12:53
hole book is about a two

Unknown Speaker 12:55
our read? Yes, yes. Yeah, they’re less than they’re less than 160 pages. intentionally, intentionally Okay, yea

Unknown Speaker 13:04
, gotcha. Well, I’m a slow

Unknown Speaker 13:06
eader. So it’ll take me a little bi

Unknown Speaker 13:08
of time. Well, it’s funny that you say that because I was brought up where my dad read books at night before we go to sleep. So I’m conditioned to fall asleep when I start reading, so I have to, I have to be in a very uncomfortable chair with a lot of light on me, has a book in front of me in order to read it not fall asleep.

Unknown Speaker 13:27
Oh, okay, well, and I’m more I even even as a kid Personally, I’m more of an auditory learn

Unknown Speaker 13:34
r. So you tell me something. That’s

Unknown Speaker 13:36
like what like, you know, YouTube’s watching YouTube’s you know, people go you know, if you want to learn something, or it’s probably on YouTube, right? You want to change oil. Look it up on YouTube. You’re making model is probably there and it’s true. It’s out there. And yeah, right now I’m learning video editing for a particular new software editing system and You know, just YouTube after YouTube after. So I can watch it and I can hear it. Yeah. But if I were to have to sit down with a manual, like, especially this, because it has everything you could imagine in it, I mean, yeah, hollywood Hollywood movies are made on the software that Oh, wow. And so, I mean, the book would be this thick, right? So there’s, there’s no way so I appreciate as a as, as someone, so that would be a size of book that I would possib

Unknown Speaker 14:30
y tackle. Oh, nice.

Unknown Speaker 14:32
hank you. So so so that’s good to know. And it’s good that you have those those little reflection, you know, kind of internal mental workshops at the end of each small chapter. So you know, and as you were talking something, you know, that that I was thinking about, I was intently listening, but you, you triggered something in me as

Unknown Speaker 14:57
a parent. Uh huh. And you kn

Unknown Speaker 15:01
w, Where, and just as a person as a human

Unknown Speaker 15:07
as a past lif

Unknown Speaker 15:09
partner, single right now, but still, you know, I recall the days it wasn’t so long ago, is, you know, the leadership skills that you learn for your work environment can also be applied in your everyday life. You know, hell, how many times have had, you know, at least in my past relationship, just deciding on where to go for dinner on Friday night? Yes, you know, if I didn’t make the decision, it typically didn’t happen or it was you know, I typically had to be the one my my ex is just like that. And so, it wasn’t necessarily that I was trying to lead or try to make a decision is just we’ll just say it’s a I’m looking for more of a way A different kind

Unknown Speaker 16:03
f person. One with a little bit

Unknown Speaker 16:06
abou

Unknown Speaker 16:08
it. But, but that’s what made me think about, you know, the the leadership skills in your own personal life. Whether that’s with friends, and it’s not about lead in this way do I say now right now i’m not talking authoritarian, right? We’re talking leadership and leadership is also about working with other people and and not always being the leader at all and every 100% of the moments at the time, right? Because that’s not being a good leader, though. So, so just trying to bring that out so folks can I can hear that. And so, learning leadership skills, everyone out there, it is printed to your entire life. And what’s great is is whenever you as a as a parent, for example, let’s say, you know, you’re like my son’s 10 and a half. And there are definitely leadership skills and parenting. And if you and I don’t, you know, I can’t think of any book out there not that I know off the top of my head that really talks about parents, he didn’t get away. That would be a really good book, not for me to write. But if you’re out there someone who is a parent and a leadership coach, I just gave you a fantastic book idea. Yes. And, and then there’s also the nonprofit world. And you know, obviously, and there’s even for students, so if you’re a student out there, there’s, you know, leadership in and around your school, you’re doing activities within your your community, and all of that could lead to scholarships. Yes. So it’s a very, very fundamental ability. That is probably why you started with th

Unknown Speaker 18:10
t. Right? Well, it’s it’s very interesting because you’re, you’re you’re spot on with this. And what I love about it is that part of my mission is to share ideas, thoughts and whatnot, either through the book or other things, and then cause people to go into their own reflection and thoughts. And that’s exactly what you did. And so two things come to mind for me one, one of the very first people that I worked with is a single mother who has, I think, four or five boys. And when she saw my book and read it, she reached out to me and said, I wish that you would work with parents because I would love to be here quiet. And I said, Well, why wouldn’t I work with you as a parent? And so we work together and it was really exciting. Seeing her has some shifts in how she parented these boys. And how they continue to grow in ways that, you know, are supported by that. And then the other is it’s kind of interesting that you picked up on this. So when I did my intro, I talked about the service industry. So in the service industry, I spent about 25 years of my 35 years. Then I went into manufacturing and I spent about almost 10 years in manufacturing. So that was all about learning and growing and reinventing myself and don’t you know, right now, it’s all about nonprofits. So I serve on several boards of nonprofits here locally. I’m a volunteer with several nonprofits and I’ve just been accepted into a program that’s specifically designed to ready individuals to be nonprofit leaders. So I think my next frontier um, you know, if everything lines up, my next frontier is going to be in the nonpro

Unknown Speaker 19:52
it world.

Unknown Speaker 19:53
h, right. I’ll keep y

Unknown Speaker 19:56
u posted. Whether here o

Unknown Speaker 20:00
offline. Yeah, exactly. I mean, because let’s face it. So if there’s some of the service industry in the manufacturing industry, and then I go into nonprofit, the next thing is I’m going to have to leave the planet and go figure out what to do on anoth

Unknown Speaker 20:13
r planet. Well, they’re very interesting. And who knows, maybe some revelations will wait with all the news coming out. I’m sorry. Now, I won’t go there. Politics. There’s so many weird stuff coming out. Yes. New. Yes. And things happening. So. So I was going to say, so so who knows what announcements might be made? Maybe maybe two major companies actually have a space program that we don’t know about right now. Exactly. Anyway,

Unknown Speaker 20:48
digress. I appreciate a lot. I appreciate that. You reflected on that and you like I say, you were spot on, you picked up on a couple of things that are near and d

Unknown Speaker 20:57
ar to me

Unknown Speaker 20:58
Awesome. Ye

Unknown Speaker 21:01
h. And so So what are you

Unknown Speaker 21:06
oing now? Yes. So by my count, I have been home for about 115 days. So my last gig was speaking at the the Leadership Forum for the Bank of association ibank Association of America here in San Antonio. They were one of the last groups to come into San Antonio for the convention. So I spoke at their event in March, and then don’t you know, a couple days later, there started to be this news about this COVID thing. And so my husband is actually a transplant survivor. And as a result of that he has a suppressed immune system. I’m told that I’m in the vulnerable population being over 60. And so between the two of us we decided that we were going to stay at home. So I think I’m home now about 115 days I’ve been out five times, most recently to go vote because voting is very important to me. So what am I doing right now what I’m doing is I’m working with these, these people that I’m collaborating with. So a woman in Israel, a woman in Canada, a woman and several women around the world, different programs that we’re working on. The most notable One is we put together this program for people who are leaders to navigate how to transition through the COVID-19. So there’s information on how to be a leader, how to do the logistics, how to create wellness, etc. So that program is taken off. And it’s been very interesting to put it together because let’s face it, we’ve never done this before. We don’t know what to do when people can’t work in their offices anymore. San Antonio is now at an infection rate of one in five people who are being tested are being tested positive. Well, a lot of ways in which we need to change the way we do business. And one of the things that I’ve always done is be that change agent. So what I’m working on now is programs and collaborate. with people in other parts of the world around coaching, around adding content, material programs, that kind of stuff, I’m writing a lot. I write a column, right for a column every week, and I put that out there. So yeah, a lot of internal work, since I can’t go out into the community, um, and based on the numbers that are coming out of San Antonio in the last few days, I’m thinking I might be home another hun

Unknown Speaker 23:29
red days. Oh, my goodness. Yeah. Yeah, it’s just this has been very

Unknown Speaker 23:37
ifficult. Yeah, here in Florida, you know, we we reopen? Yes, had just an incredible, you know, Spike record record numbers, you know, new cases. And it’s going to be very interesting. And my sister and I were talking the other day and she just heard From her son’s University, he’s in his first year of college out of state. And he’s been home, you know, since this is happened, like all universities have been shut down. Right. And he’s on summer break now. Right. But they just got notice this last about two days ago that there’s a high potential that the new fall semester will likely be at hom

Unknown Speaker 24:28
as well.

Unknown Speaker 24:29
Oh, okay. Yeah. So where and they’re, they’re still they’re just getting the heads up, that that might be a potential. But if so, you know, you’re looking at that would, you know, that’s going to be through

Unknown Speaker 24:43
December? Yeah, it’s interesting, because in Texas, the announcements are made that the students are going to go back to school. And so now everyone’s you know, scrambling and trying to figure that out. Here’s the thing that I’ll tell you and it goes back to my passion around being a leader. I’m so sorry. One of the models for leadership that we have available to us on a regular basis is politicians. And I don’t necessarily talk about politics, because that’s not part of who I am. And I don’t want that to be out there in the world. Because that’s that’s not how I show up or what I do. However, when you look at politicians, as leaders, which many people do, because they like to call them leaders, right, they don’t call them politicians, they call them leaders. And you look at something like COVID. And you look at it not only within your community, because we have a mayor, we have a judge. We have a governor. And then of course, we have a president and then you look beyond that to the globe. You look at countries like New Zealand with their prime minister, and you start looking at the ways in which leaders lead around these events. And what’s interesting for me is, this is why I have a passion around leadership coaching and mentoring. There is a way of approaching these things that you can balance the people and the profits because let’s face it, opening the economy is about profit. It’s not about people. And what happened in Texas, they politicized it to the point where the governor wanted one agenda. And the local authorities wanted another agenda. While we were under the initial agenda, it was flat. When the governor’s agenda was implemented it, we had 1200 and 68 cases one day this week. That’s an insane number of cases. So again, this might sound political, but it’s not. It’s an observation of leadership. And what I was impressed with, from the very, very beginning of this whole thing, no matter where you were, was, it was about the capacity volume model, which is a key component for any leader, what is the amount of incoming and do you have the resources to take the amount of incoming that’s coming in, and it’s all based on the hospital beds. So now looking at the numbers because the numbers haven’t been managed or taken care of properly. We’re now in a situation where we may not have enough beds and enough personnel to be able to support those patients. So this COVID thing has been a massive lesson. And watching leaders and how different leaders do what they do. I mean, one last thing, my husband bought me this amazing mask, because we had some masks that a friend made and sent to us. And he said, I want to take our mask up to the next level. And I’m like, you know, honey, five days out. And in 115 days, it doesn’t work, spending $20 on a mask, he’s like, No, I want you to have the best mask ever. Who would have thought wearing a mask is a statement on who I am and how I show up. It’s a mask. I’m taking care of myself. So anyway, thank you for letting me get on my soapbox. It’s not very tall. I don’t stay on for very long. This COVID thing is just a massive learning opportunity when it comes

Unknown Speaker 27:38
to leadership. Absolutely, and it’s a massive opportunity in so many

Unknown Speaker 27:48
ays, you know? The necessity is the mother of invention. Yes. So, you know, so entrepreneurs out there, that current business you know, businesses or want to be entrepreneurs? This is your time. Yep. As we talked about earlier, we weren’t even talki

Unknown Speaker 28:10
g about COVID. Rig

Unknown Speaker 28:12
t. Right. But, you know, we were talking about how, you know, if you don’t adapt, you die, yes a business. And, you know, but there’s also in in the, in the, in the

Unknown Speaker 28:29
fe

Unknown Speaker 28:31
tile ground of change and chaos. There’s also that opportunity to seed and lead, seed and grow. Yes, see, seed, a new business and grow. Now, in doing all of that, you also have to do a few other things. And that is look at your competi

Unknown Speaker 28:56
ive

Unknown Speaker 28:58
andscape. And

Unknown Speaker 29:00
and for that, I

Unknown Speaker 29:01
have, I think, a pretty good article on

Unknown Speaker 29:07
t. It’s called analyzing your competitors. It’s doing a SWOT analysis, which is your strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. You know, look at the, the likelihood that that anywhere is going 100% go back to where we were just six months ago,

Unknown Speaker 29:34
s really slim. So, you’

Unknown Speaker 29:38
e already seen people, you know, start little mini businesses on creating face mass creating fashionable, just face masks. Yes. Okay. So, you know, and you know, lots of people pulled out their sewing machine that they haven’t used in 15 years and threw stuff together. And then for example, there’s this one fella dow

Unknown Speaker 30:02
in Fort Lau

Unknown Speaker 30:05
erdale, Florida. And he makes some pretty dang cool face masks. I mean they are truly beautiful. Yeah, where the world he gets all of his fabrics from bu

Unknown Speaker 30:15
they

Unknown Speaker 30:17
real

Unknown Speaker 30:18
y, really cool. And, you know, so that’s a little mini business or is taking something he already was doing and just adapted it yes to the current situation and you know taking a look at even your own current business and how do you adapt. So for example, on yesterday’s or just uploaded today, there is another show which kind of goes into this and that is, I think it does or I’m going to make it stretch and and tell you what, there’ll be a rate up here, go ahead and click on that. Right click it and open a new window finish this video. But then watch that one right there here in a minute. And it’s called local SEO, which is search engine optimization. So local SEO for small businesses during COVID. And so in that example, there was a local small business for a shop in New York City well with the COVID and everything was shutting down. And these two guys who run that that business a, a ag to media in New York City, that that flower shop has been their client, they did their branding and so forth. And you know, in New York City, you live and die by the foot traffic and word of mouth. So it all looked great. And the the out the gate business owner had great business. Well, so these folks took, took a leadership role and said went back to to that customer and who who was who had to let go all of a staff that said what about your local SEO? And that is getting online as nowadays people you know, they want to search online and they want to find your business online, see what you have possibly place an order online or calling an order. So you know you in order to lead it’s not just that you have to, you know, have 50 staff to lead sometimes, you know, I’m even currently still a business one, and I even have to sell lead myself. Yes, you know, and but you as a business owner or a new business owner, you have to lead your business and think about how our customers and clients finding you and engaging with you and if you don’t have the foot traffic that you did or you’re starting a new business, you know, think about it being predominantly online is, you know, one of the other factors of that, you know, for example for you, you know, obviously Phil having speaking engagements, it’s so much more common now to have a speaking engagement and do it all via online as we are talking now. Yes. So, in the past paradigm, a speaking engagement might have been had you have included either on your costs for the organization’s costs, travel expenses, right, yes

Unknown Speaker 33:44
airfare food hotel, plus, all the

Unknown Speaker 33:50
acilities, the event Where, where? And yes, there is a there is an energy

Unknown Speaker 34:00
hat you get from

Unknown Speaker 34:03
it. Being in person, all of everyone has to adapt and still be able to lead their organizations lead their nonprofits lead their, their, their industry associations, and so forth, and still have great speakers come in. And so this is an opportunity to lead. And so even for you, you know, hopefully you’re already doing this, but, you know, reaching out to people and saying, I’m available for virtual virtual summits, and here are my topics, right? Yes, being able to lead and adapt and change. So. So I just wanted, you know, to kind of retouch on that that subject, as well, because I was very impressed with that example that I got yesterday that’s now on YouTube. And again, yeah, I’ll put another link right there. And so, we have been talking we don’t have to say the name again. But we had been talking t

Unknown Speaker 35:02
In the past about a a big summit that you were working o

Unknown Speaker 35:06
, is that comp

Unknown Speaker 35:10
etely still on hold? So are you talking about the one that was going to be done here locally in Santa Fe? Yes. So here’s the exciting news. So I’m the earlier when I talk about nonprofits, one of the nonprofit’s that I serve on is TEDx San Antonio. And so while it’s my goal to be a TEDx speaker, I love getting to know organizations from the inside out. It’s just part of how I tick. And so I have the opportunity to serve on that nonprofit. And in doing so, last December, it was I was part of the organizing committee for the women’s salon, which is where we had live speakers and video speakers, all focused on women’s issues. And what came out of that was the licensee here in San Antonio asked me to be the lead organizer for a TEDx salon, specifically focused on the LGBTQ community. And so you might imagine in January, I was like kicking up my heels, I was all excited, you know, that hadn’t been done before. There’s a minimal number of talks on TEDx that are related to this. And something I really energizing, I really excited about it. And then COVID hits. And when COVID hit, I found myself being on more and more conversations, virtual conversations around, what do we do, it was that whole thing about reacting to it. And so one of the things that I did while on one of the calls was support, not having it and not having it virtually. And so that was really hard for me, because I was so excited about it. However, I knew and it’s what you talked about earlier, that I think is really a suit on your part to have that kind of event virtually would not have conveyed the full the full experience. And so rather than turn it into a virtual one, which I saw, you know, all the virtual prize and all that stuff, and kudos to them. That was really cool. And wonderful and all that I wanted to be a part of something that was going to be in person. And so at this point, it’s not going to happen this year. My hope and the conversations that I continue to have with the licensee is that we can do it next June because June, obviously is the month to do it. So at the rate that we’re going, when we start in the fall and start planning for it, it’s going to be one amazing experience. So yes, thank you for bringing that up. Because I think that’s all part of this change that we’re experiencing right now. And let me just tell, tell you this, and I know that you already know this. And it’s interesting the way that he talks about change. Anytime that I went into change, what I knew was that eventually it was it would become normalized. So you and I having a zoom conversation right now is normalized by the fact that all of the night time talk show hosts, and all of the daytime talk shows and all of that are all being done on zoom or Skype. And so something that you and I will I’ve done six months ago because I was on zoom however far back. Now all of a sudden, everybody’s changed the zoom. And it’s normalized because you turn on the TV and you see the TV show being done in zoom format. So reality is that if people will embrace the changes that are in front of us, they’ll eventually be normalized to them. And quite frankly, they don’t go through near the pain that they think they do around the change. I mean, you still click the TV on you still get the program. It just looks a little bit different because you’ve

Unknown Speaker 38:34
got

Unknown Speaker 38:36
oxes of people. Yes, yes, they don’t. It’s a little less production value. But But you know, what, also I find this interesting is is normalizing it and make and

Unknown Speaker 38:49
avin

Unknown Speaker 38:50
it accessible. Yes, I mean, that that we’re able to do this that you know, I then take this and turn it into podcasts that gets on 13 differe

Unknown Speaker 38:59
t podcasts. Exactly. So, I was just reminded in my Facebook feed 11 years ago this month, I was working for a massive consulting firm with global presence. And what was interesting was they asked me to do a virtual train the trainer and I’m like, Uh, what? Like we want you to do virtual trading to trader. So being the risk taker being the adventure being the guy who’s willing to jump out there. I was like, Okay, so what does that look like? So the short version is that I had my laptop, I had it in home. The color the The training was that maybe four o’clock in the morning because of the global time zones. So four o’clock in the morning, I have my laptop, and I am virtually delivering a train the trainer to I don’t know 35 4050 people around the world. That was my first exposure to that ever when I was done with it. I was like, so excited. I thought you know, I I entered into the space age. call centers. And now I look 11 years later, and what am I doing? I’m having a virtual conversation with you over a cup of coffee, just just the same as if we were sitt

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

OutBüro Voices Interview Scott Vedder LGBT Entrpreneir Resume Career Advisor Human Resources Professional Military Veteran to Cilian Work Employment Consultant Business Owner Video Interview Podcast

LGBT Professionals: Job Hunt With a FABULOUS Resume (2020)

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We’d love your text comments at the bottom of each show episode page asking questions of me, our guests, and interacting with other commenters.

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Scott Vedder is an LGBT entrepreneur focusing as a professional career coach helping to craft resumes that stand out effectively communicating the skills and past success that align with a candidate’s ideal target jobs. Job search tips for writing a great resume for all including military veterans transitioning to civilian careers, gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) professionals seeking a career change and new job. Maximize your resume to improve your job search chances.

  • 01:50 Introducing Scott Vedder
  • 02:50 Most resumes are awful so he wrote a book to help
  • 03:30 Special edition for US military veterans
  • 07:20 US Veterans are some of the best job candidates in the workforce
  • 08:15 Signs of a great resume to quantify what makes you a great fit for the job
  • 10:30 Your LinkedIn profile should not be a literal copy of your resume. Think of it as a marketing brochure. Make it POP.
  • 12:30 Tips to create an amazing resume that intrigues and WOW’s like a movie trailer.
  • 14:00 Networking and relationship building should be ongoing
  • 18:00 You will NEVER hear a recruiter say, “The candidate made it too easy to see why they are a great fit for this job”
  • 18:30 The biggest mistake you can make on a resume is writing it like a job description.
  • 20:45 Lose the jargon. Keep the language simple, concise and typically no acronyms unless super commonly known
  • 28:45 Should you be OUT as LGBTQ on your resume?
  • 33:00 Researching employers on their LGBTQ inclusiveness – it is darn difficult
  • 37:00 Join HTTP://WWW.OUTBURO.COM add your professional profile, rate/review your current and recent past employers so that your ratings provide feedback to employers and are available for future candidates
  • 42:00 Ways to further research a potential employer’s LGBTQA friendliness

Scott Vedder conducted over 5,000 interviews as a recruiter at a Fortune 100 company. He quickly discovered that a good résumé is truly hard to come by and that most applicants don’t have a clue what recruiters want to see. Scott’s book “Signs of a Great Résumé” is a #1 best-selling book on Amazon.com and has been endorsed as “Recommended Reading” by the Central Florida Employment Council (CFEC) and the Central Florida Jobs Initiative. Scott is often quoted as an expert resource and is a regular contributor to a number of international blogs, magazines, syndicated newspaper columns, and web sites. Scott has also been interviewed on dozens of live television and radio news programs. While on speaking engagement’s Scott was often asked by military veterans how to best translate their military experience to a civilian job market. This led to the adapted version of his best selling book to focus on military veterans. His focus on and strong involvement with veteran groups led him to be personally invited to the White House twice under two administrations to be recognized by the Society for Human Resource Management, Women Unlimited and the Metropolitan Business Association, LGBT Chamber of Commerce for his contributions and for helping job seekers around the world.

Scott Vedder on OutBüro > https://www.outburo.com/profile/scott_vedder/

Signs of a Great Resume – Book

Scott Vedder Signs of a Great Resume LGBT Entrpreneir Resume Career Advisor Human Resources Professional Military Veteran to Cilian Work Employment Consultant

Scott’s #1 best-selling book, Signs of a Great Résumé, will teach you how to write a résumé that speaks for itself. This lighthearted book presents an effective approach to the serious business of writing résumés. Scott’s style is humorous, easy to understand and fun to read …if he does say so himself!

Scott has developed a simple way to make your résumé speak for itself, using !@#$%, the Signs of a Great Résumé. Each sign showcases your experience and skills and highlights your greatest achievements and contributions.

  • ! Any part of your experience that was “amazing!”
  • @ Defining points, places, dates, and things in your career
  • # Numbers that quantify and prove your past successes
  • $ The dollar value of your contributions
  • % Figures that easily show growth and results

Whether you’re a recent grad or a CEO, a garbage collector or an astrophysicist, you can use Signs of a Great Résumé to make your experience shine… and recruiters love to see some nice, shiny experience on a résumé!

This lighthearted book presents an effective approach to the serious business of writing résumés. Scott’s style is humorous, easy to understand and fun to read …if he does say so himself! In this book you’ll learn how to customize your résumé for each job using !@#$%, how to write a great cover letter and more.

Signs of a Great Resume – Veterans Edition

Scott Vedder Signs of a Great Resume Veterans Edition LGBT Entrpreneir Resume Career Advisor Human Resources Professional Military Veteran to Cilian Work Employment Consultant

Veterans, transitioning service members and military families can get great new jobs in the civilian sector with Signs of a Great Résumé: Veterans Edition. Tell civilian recruiters, “I am a P.A.T.R.I.O.T.” Learn to highlight the military values and characteristics that make you a great candidate for the civilian workplace. Taking the above principle and further applying the veteran-specific skills referenced as PATRIOT to stand out and land that new civilian job.

Scott Vedder LGBT Entrpreneir Resume Career Advisor Human Resources Professional Military Veteran to Cilian Work Employment Consultant at US White House

Conversation Auto Transcrpit

The below was created through voice to text recognition. We will strive to edit for accuracy as time permits. It may not be perfect. It is being provided for the hearing impaired to still enjoy the interview.

Unknown Speaker 0:01
Hello, this is Dennis Velco with OutBüro that is oh you to be you are Oh, thank you so much for tuning in to OutBüro Voices, the new series where we are chatting with in a very casual and informative and hopefully a little bit entertaining way with LGBTQ leaders, entrepreneurs and professionals in all types of professions. Today we have a special guest named Scott Vetter. But before we get to him, make sure you take a few moments and hit the subscribe button down below if you are viewing on YouTube. If you are listening to this on one of the podcast apps such as Apple podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, I Heart Radio, Google Apps and about 10 others also know that you are able to view this directly on the out bureau podcasts or episode pages I might be changing that now that we’re doing more videos and then taking that to podcasts but know that you’re able to watch the videos on directly the out bureau comm website as well as the new YouTube channel so now if you search YouTube for LGBT entrepreneur or and or LGBT professional, guess what? OutBüro Voices pops up on the first pages so awesome. So we’re going to be bringing the helping to bring the visibility of LGBT entrepreneurs and professionals around the world to you. So again today, welcome, welcome. We have Scott a. Scott Vetter is a human resources professional with years of experience in the fortune 500 levels space He has written a book and adapted it for military veterans. And I much appreciate that being a US Army veteran myself. So welcome so much to the show, Scott. Well, thanks

Unknown Speaker 2:12
for having me here, Dennis. That’s a real privilege and a pleasure.

Unknown Speaker 2:15
Awesome. Well, I do appreciate you taking time out of your busy day to chat with us here. And as always, there is a little bit of format. I always like to start off with our guests, such as yourself, chatting a little bit about your history, a little bit of your career journey, and then we’ll move that into your your projects and so forth that’s been that you’ve been working on most recently.

Unknown Speaker 2:40
Sure, thanks. You know, I was like you said I worked in the fortune 500. I was a fortune 100 recruiter. And when I was recruiting, what I realized is, most people’s resumes are awful. And that wasn’t unique to military veterans or civilians. It was just most people didn’t know what I was looking for. How I use that information as a recruiter on a resume. So I wrote a book about it chiefly event, my own frustration there. Look at that. That’s a book. I’m on a book. That’s me.

Unknown Speaker 3:13
And I said, You know what, I think

Unknown Speaker 3:14
I can help people. And it really took off, you know, became a best seller. I went on the book tour, and wherever I’d go, I’d meet military veterans, they’d say, Hey, what about us? It’s different. And I’d say, Well, hey, what do I know I didn’t serve. But that my grandfather bill did. They were both army e6 is that’s a staff sergeant level when they got out, and nobody helped them. There were no transition programs, the Vietnam era or World War Two. And there’s a lot of great groups we have out there today. They’re helping in the transition.

Unknown Speaker 3:45
But we still haven’t quite found

Unknown Speaker 3:46
the magic recipe of how to translate and transfer all of the military experience to the civilian world. So that’s where I knew I had to help. So I became smarter about the military disability and career transition. It has become the really primary focus of my work with resumes. And I’ve become a passionate civilian advocate for veterans in the workforce. I actually was able to write a follow up version of the book just for veterans, the veterans edition of signs of a great resume. And I began networking and meeting people in the space actually earned myself a personal invitation to meet in the office of First Lady Michelle Obama at waco. Yeah, yeah, with the program they were doing at the time called Joining Forces. And then I also met with the warrior and family support group and the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff at the Pentagon, to provide a fair and balanced viewpoint and how I support veterans. I was actually invited last night out two years ago to the current administration’s White House, where I delivered my resume and interview workshops at the White House military office. And for those of you who have not served that’s the people who drive the beast of the President’s car and they run Camp David Air Force One and carry around the very important suitcase. Near proximity to the president all the time. So I got to help, you know, give a little insight as to what the next chapter of their career may look like for those who are transitioning. And of course, the caveat is no government, or God. Sponsorship is implied of any story is just this is one of the many ways I found my real passion in life, which is that I help people, especially veterans find success in their career. And now I do one on one interview and resume coaching with transitioning service members from all branches and civilians to but I work with a number of really great nonprofit organizations who support the veteran transition program and help fund services that really enable them for success in the civilian workforce.

Unknown Speaker 5:44
Okay, wonderful. Well, you know, I, it, there there are, it’s not too many, but what I’m saying is there’s a lot of people who do focus to some degree on helping people with their resume. And they’re, you know, career coaches and so forth. There’s a plethora of that for, you know, the general market. So you know, one way as an entrepreneur, no matter what kind of business you happen to run, is to focus on a niche market, whatever that happens to be, and so let’s say you’re a dog groomer. So then just focusing on you know, a particular breed if you happen to have around obviously, but just to try to draw the analogy here is if you are the best German Shepherd dog groomer in the your state, and you get all of the champions, you’re going to attract a certain level of prestige and you know, folks coming to you knowing that you are the specialist and that again, is really within any kind of a business category because you know, that really is how you can differentiate yourself in any category is is new Focus. And so that’s very interesting that you, you have taken that from your career and resume advice and focusing on the underserved market of the veterans coming coming out of service and transitioning into the workforce. So yeah,

Unknown Speaker 7:18
I think, well, in part, it’s formed by my strong belief that veterans are some of the best employees we have in the civilian workforce. They’re just some of the worst job candidates, because the one thing the military does not make them really good at doing while they’re in is becoming a civilian job candidate. And while there are programs, there’s something called tap transition assistance programs that start to teach some philosophical things about the transition, they only really scratched the surface. So that’s why it’s wonderful to see that there are many veteran service organizations specializing in this and several programs that even the Department of Defense has started to fund to really enable their success where I come in is really Helping to tell the story of how what you have done in the military or in any prior career relates to what you’re going to do in the civilian workforce. And that’s what I described as using What you see behind me the signs of a great resume. They probably look like curse words in a comic strip, I promise I’m not teaching veterans to curse on a resume. What they are is specific moments that make you a particularly great candidate for a job. And this applies to any job seeker, not just veterans. But what I want to know as a recruiter is what you in particular bring to the future opportunity. So these signs of a great resume. The first one

Unknown Speaker 8:38
is the exclamation point.

Unknown Speaker 8:39
Wow, look at what I did. Nobody else could say that. At what point you gained the most relevant experience and some numbers dollars and percent they helped to quantify exactly what makes you a great fit for the job. If you ever need to remember what the signs of a great resume are, is look down at your keyboard. They’re above the above the numbers one through five, that’s where the signs of a great resume are. These are the key to standing out and differentiating yourself on any resume, civilian military or otherwise, federal resume or any kind, you can use the signs of a great resume.

Unknown Speaker 9:15
So write a resume that speaks for itself.

Unknown Speaker 9:18
Awesome, very much like that. And, you know, obviously, this did come up through your being a recruiter at a fortune 500 actually fortune 100 if not fortune 10. company. And so talk about you know, some of the, you know, you mentioned this came out of almost, well, you said a frustration there. So, you know, I to, you know, even in in looking and trying to reach out to people to come on to the show, you know, I’m going through and looking even at LinkedIn profiles and I’m say to myself, holy crap, we really think that this is going to get the attention. You know, like, There’s no use of this. For some people. They don’t use the taglines. Well, so looking in a summary of people, it’s very hard. They don’t stand out. And so that that tagline in your LinkedIn profile should, should, you know, people really need to understand that LinkedIn should not be used as a literal translation of your resume. If you’re using LinkedIn like that, folks, you’re using it wrong. Because it’s really a marketing tool. Right? It’s so that first tagline should be your, you know, three to 10 word. Bam. This is what’s important. This is why I stand out. This is why you should click right here on me. Like your exclamation point. Right, it should be that that tag should be the wow factor. And there’s so many people that I’m going through and I’m like, okay, I kind of get, and I’m, you know, trying to show, obviously diversity and inclusion with my desk. And you know, but it’s like, oh my gosh, I’m digging and digging and digging. So I could imagine, as a recruiter, going through even just thinking on LinkedIn, there’s only what how does this person stand out? Right? How does this How does this person translate or communicate what they’re doing? So and then I will be honest, I’m going through all right, if you’ve got my little bit of attention, based on that little bit of info in that little block right there. Now I click through, and it’s amazing how many people do not have a summary.

Unknown Speaker 11:54
Right and and the same holds true on a resume. So you know, I’ll agree that that the point is to capture Someone’s I quickly and that’s definitely a parallel between LinkedIn and the resume. The way you catch someone’s eye quickly on LinkedIn is with that header. And it should be compelling. And a lot of people don’t tell you anything interesting or new up there. It’s just like, project manager. Okay. Well, you and everybody else. Exactly. Let me tell you a quick secret about the civilian workforce, and maybe jobs in general, when it comes to job titles, we just make things up. And when we don’t know what to call it, we call it project manager. Everyone in their brother, including me twice, has held the title of Project Manager, and I absolutely am not like a PMP or anything like that, where that is my professional craft. But nonetheless, the more descriptive, you can be in that LinkedIn headline to really catch someone’s eye and say, hey, there’s something unique here. To keep them reading is the same principle on your resume. So on a resume, one of the very first things that I encourage you to do is write like a summary of qualifications. I call it that in Not an executive summary or professional profile? Because I want it to summarize what you can do for me. What are you qualified to do? I look at it like the movie trailer of your resume. So if you were writing a film preview, right, like in a world where this is my experience, you know what, what you would say, to entice me to see the film is what you would put in a summary of qualifications on a resume. And that block of text on the resume is something you can tailor like you’ll tailor the rest of your resume to each job opportunity, your LinkedIn profile, you only get one LinkedIn profile. So it should be the overall trailer about what is it that you bring in a nutshell to any opportunity that you’re pursuing.

Unknown Speaker 13:41
But yeah, I agree with you that there’s a lot of parallels. And

Unknown Speaker 13:44
really the distinction between LinkedIn and resumes is the way that you use LinkedIn to contribute to the conversation to things going on in the industry, whatever industry you’re in, and also to make connections because really The best way to apply for a job is not to ideally you want to be networking far in advance of your needing a job. So you’re starting to build relationships, relationships first, then results and jobs follow.

Unknown Speaker 14:16
Absolutely, I could not agree more. And you know, you bring up a point of the, the pound symbol, the dollar symbol and the percent, you know, one of the most viewed articles on out bureau.com is should I be out on my resume and we’ll talk about that one moment. Because I definitely want to get to that with you. One of the others, I have a few, a few articles on it. And by the way, if you’re listening, you are all of you may post articles on the website just like you post articles funneling in, as well as out Bureau has a professional profile. as well, so that diversity and inclusion directors and recruiters can find you and be very targeted in their diversity and inclusion. Searching. In addition, you’re able to indicate your military status veterans veteran, which branch in Singapore, but but some of the things that I really kind of occasionally I get people that that think I’m a recruiter or think that I’m a career coach or something, and they’ll reach out to me and say, oh, could you review my resume? Or could you review my LinkedIn profile? Oh, yes. Like I have nothing else to do. You know? What number one you’re not paying me to do this because I don’t even know what to charge for that. But you know, every now and then if I you know, have a 15 minute kind of time slot out sometimes do that. And then I look through and I go, okay, where’s again, where’s that wow factor. There were the numbers where where, you know, you say you project manager, well, what did you achieve? What did you say? What did you improve and quantify that?

Unknown Speaker 16:10
Right? Absolutely.

Unknown Speaker 16:12
recruiters and companies want to see, you know, people would say, Oh, I manage this I manage projects efficiently. Yeah, well, what the heck does that mean? Right? I manage projects efficiently. What what what quantify efficient for me? One, what was the size of the project? Was it a $5,000? project, a $50,000. Project, a $500,000 project? How many people were on the team? What were you trying to accomplish? I mean, just just give some some pure exam, give some real examples, and give some quantifiable numbers. Met project deliverables in 20% under time with only utilizing AI Were 80% of the budget. So something that gives the recruiters that knowledge that Oh, yes, they are an efficient project manager, you know the word

Unknown Speaker 17:09
read my book, Dennis, that’s really well done.

Unknown Speaker 17:13
Thank you. Now I’ve got articles myself as well. And that’s why, whenever I saw what you’re doing, I’m like, Oh my gosh, this is this is so pertinent. And it’s things that I’ve talked about in the past. And again, I occasionally get asked and building my, my own network of people. Now when I have someone, especially with military experience, I can say, hey, you should talk to this fella right here.

Unknown Speaker 17:37
I think you make an important point. And, you know, but but the fact that we agree on these points of quantifying your experience is critical. And while you can ask 100 recruiters our opinions about resumes, you will get 150 opinions or more about resumes. What you will never hear recruiters say is the candidate made it too easy. To see why he’s a great fit for this job. That’s not gonna happen. And when you use the signs of a great resume, you’re making the recruiters job easier, effectively as a recruiter. My function is to become your sales agent. I need to pitch you to the boss and say, Hey, you know that person you need me to hire for you? I think Dennis has what you’re looking for. Look at how we quantified this experience and gave specific results. The biggest mistake you can make on a resume is you write a resume that reads like a job description. So think about l

Unknown Speaker 18:34
ke a soldier who j

Unknown Speaker 18:35
st Yeah, right. If a teacher writes, taught English classes, graded papers, tract grades, prepares students for the next level. Well, great, that’s what teachers do. But that’s the job description of every English teacher. And so if I’m hiring teachers, and every one of them just says that, how do I know who to hire I don’t. And that is the reality that recruiters face is there’s tons of resumes in our system. On our desk, it all look and sound pretty much the same. Because people make that same mistake, a resume that reads like a job description is the deadliest mistake you can make on a resume. And it’s especially difficult if that job descriptions about a military job, because some 97% of Americans have never served. So we just don’t understand as directly what that job description means and how it helps us. The very simple way to assess your current resume to see Am I making that mistake is you take your resume and your cover your name at the top, then you reread what you have written. If it could be anybody else’s resume. It’s not good enough, because I don’t want to know what a project manager does, or what an infantry soldier does, or what a Navy Captain does. What I want to know is what did you do and how does that relate to what I need you to do in this j

Unknown Speaker 19:55
b? Absolutely. And so what are you know, gearing your your your time doing th

Unknown Speaker 20:03
s. Or there may be a few examples that you could give with clients that you’ve had in the past that, you know, either some tips or just examples of how you like how you took military lingo and translated that into job candidate language. Su

Unknown Speaker 20:23
e, yeah. I get this question all the time from veterans, and frankly, from civilians in very technical careers who are changing the kind of work they’re going to do. So this advice applies in both instances. But when it comes to explaining a prior career that does not directly align, especially when that’s a military career that’s changing your job function. What I want you to do and you can do this with me live if you’re watching at home or listening, just close your eyes for a moment. And I want you to picture somewhere in your life, an 11 year old ch

Unknown Speaker 20:55
ld whose parents are not in the military. Can you picture that

Unknown Speaker 21:00
id That kid knows about as much about the army as most civilian adults. You cannot trust civilians to know what the heck you’re talking about unless a fifth grader would understand you. So you got to pass what I call the smart fifth grader test with every word you write on your resume. And there are just three simple questions on the smarter fifth grader test. The first one is, are you using simple language, language so clear and 11 year old would get it? And the simple answer to that in most military resumes I get it is no, because there’s a certain language to the military. And that of course includes lots of capitalization and jargon and acronyms that just do not mean things to civilians. As a general rule, if you’re hitting the caps lock, you’re losing the civilians understanding of what it is you’re talking about. You know, some exceptions apply. You know, if you’re using a term, the average news watching American would know FBI, USA those are fine Don’t bother trying to explain to most civilians, that seal is actually an acronym for Sierra Atlantic, just stick with seal. But otherwise, avoid the acronyms and even words that you might use every day in a military career that mean different stuff to us. So for instance, if you say deploy, and you mean get sent somewhere, I might think you mean how parachutes work they deploy. If you say joint, and you mean, interagency, I might think you mean arthritis or marijuana. Just keep it very simple. And the good news is, if an 11 year old would understand it, so would another veteran, they’ll just know Oh, are you actually talking about a drink team? Are you remember, they’ll know all of that, but write it to the lowest common denominator of understanding is about the 11 year old level? That’s the first question. The second question for the smart fifth grader is are you focused on good news only? Now, I recognize the business of fighting war is not always good news. I get it. But I don’t need to hear about knocking down doors and find the bad guys or anything like it. What I want to know is how to make the world a better place. And this goes back to what Dennis was saying a minute ago, where you mentioned how like the specific accomplishments that a project manager might have had, how you make the world a better place is a better way to approach the types of examples with the signs of a great resume that makes you a great fit. I want to know what you did specifically, that’s good news for your past employer, in this case, the military and for your future employer, how it relates. And the third and final question for the smart fifth grader is are you getting to the point quick

Unknown Speaker 23:39
y, because both an 11 year old and a recruiter hav

Unknown Speaker 23:42
a super short attention sp

Unknown Speaker 23:45
n? I’m told there’s a military term that actually works nicely he

Unknown Speaker 23:48
e, bluff bottom line up fro

Unknown Speaker 23:51
t, and it’s the way military leaders say you know, when you make your PowerPoint or something, make sure you make the point right away. So if general so and so loses focus or has to go Very gotten your point across. Well, the way I think about bluff as a civilian is, can you tell me a fairy tale backwards for every bullet that you write? they all lived happily ever after good news, because once upon a time, you some details if you made

Unknown Speaker 24:17
t. Yeah, God. And you know, that’s really good advice for everyone out there looking at their resume and LinkedIn profile because again, you know, yes, there’s aspects of your career and bullet points on your professional profile on LinkedIn and out there that you want to include. But that below that, that bluff analogy is, is really good. And that’s keeping it short, simple to the point and think of it as a as a marketing statement, every statement on your resume. You need to think of it with that marketing I how is going to Wow, the person viewing this How is it Going to make us stand o

Unknown Speaker 25:02
t. A lot of veterans say to me, Scott, I don’t like talking about myself. And you know, I think maybe that comes from service in the military is a selfless service, you know, you’re serving that greater mission. you’re called to serve for whatever reason that is, and to them, I say, and to everyone, I don’t want you to talk about yourself. The first filter I need you to put on your resume is that well, yes, your name is at the top. This resume is not about you. It’s about what you can do for me. Everything you write has to be filtered with that in mind first, and it means that there may be things in your career that were significant. You’re proud of them, they made a real difference in the world. Well, great, I’m glad you did them. But if they don’t relate to what you can do for me, you might not need to tell me about them. And that becomes a powerful first filter to use and the very simple way you use that filter on a resume, to read a statement or a line or a bullet. You’ve got to ask yourself so what What is this new company going to do with this information? And if you can’t answer the So what? And you know, you pretty darn well, you’ve lived with you your whole life. How am I supposed to answer the so what if I’m the new compa

Unknown Speaker 26:13
y? Gotcha, gotcha. So making sure that that everything on your resume is tailored towards that position, and especially the position and the company, the employer, because it may not be a company, right? Yes, it may be government, it may be a nonprofit and so forth are used that I’ll try to stick with employer. So you need to think about what that what your skill set and the wow factor that you can bring and how, how that translates for that employer and that particular role that you’re going aft

Unknown Speaker 26:51
r? Yeah, that goes back to the idea of tailoring your resume and tailoring your resume. You need to know if it’s about what you can do for Me You need to know what’s important to me. And the simple way to know that is I tell you, there are job postings. So you just when you’re applying to a job, you’ve seen a job online on LinkedIn or indeed Career Builder, any of those sites or USA jobs.gov. If you’re applying to work in federal government still, and the employer is giving you a literal wish list, this is what we need. And there are three parts to a job posting, usually there’s a description. So you know, do I want to do this all the time, and some minimum and preferred qualifications or basic and desired qualifications? Well, the description is a good place for you to assess what’s important, they may give you clues like about their culture, about their diversity and inclusion practices, and about their priorities for their business in the year ahead. And the minimum and preferred qualifications are the filters for what kinds of information you need to market to them, if you will, about your prior experience. I look at the qualifications list, like buying a car. The minimum qualified candidates are like Toyota’s, they’re fine. They’re just not special. Seemed like anybody could get a Toyota and it’s fine. It’s a good car very reliable. I think the number one selling car in America is a Toyota. But the preferred qualified candidates, the ones who are darn near perfect are like a Rolls Royce. Whoo fact that the perfect candidate, that’d be great. Well, you don’t have to be a Rolls Royce to get an interview or to land the job. You just got to come in somewhere around Lexus to be a compelling candidate. The more your Lexus sounds like my Rolls Royce wishlist, the better shape you’re

Unknown Speaker 28:35
n. Okay, gotcha. Gotcha. So, let’s talk a little bit about some of the other aspects of applying for a job I brought up the you know, should you be out on your resume? That is the second most viewed article on my website, outside of venture funding for entrepreneurs. And so there’s obviously lot and I, I’m pretty clear in my article about my position and I talked with several other people but being in, you know, in your role in your professional role at the company plus, writing your book, have you ever come across clients of yours or candidates are so for then, you know that had a really out resume or or not kind of found out, in fact, just kind of give us a little bit of perspective since the majority of our audience, you know, is focused on the LGB

Unknown Speaker 29:39
Q. Sure. So your resume should always be about what you can do for me and why you are qualified to do the job that you’re applying for. If a component of that is identifying as a part of or a contributor to the success of the LGBTQ community, then yes, it is relevant concept to cover in your resume. However, As we got to both sides of my mouth, you can give examples about how you have supported the LGBTQ community. And not all of those need to be about work. Your resume is not things that got a paycheck for, it’s things that make my experience valid. So if, for instance, you were going to work at an employer in their diversity and inclusion department, and you do an extensive amount of volunteering at the LGBTQ center in your community, maybe doing testing or counseling or some kind of, you know, groups that you h

Unknown Speaker 30:30
lp put togeth

Unknown Speaker 30:31
r, that is perhaps a relevant example, for a diversity and inclusion job because you’re saying, Look, I’ve reached out to this community. Now, how overtly you state Oh, and I’m a member of that community. Well, that then comes down to how much information is appropriate to disclose on a resume. And a few weeks ago, my my message may have been somewhat different. But very recently, as many are unsure attune to the Supreme Court has ruled that discrimination on the basis of sex Something covered under Title seven, the Civil Rights Act. Now, okay, we got all this by saying I’m not a lawyer, if you have questions about the law, go see a lawyer. However, for informational purposes only. Title seven is very broadly, we’ll just call the idea that you cannot discriminate employment practices on the basis of certain protected classes. And those include things like race, religion, sex, and that word sex has now been interpreted by the Supreme Court ruling to include sexual orientation and gender identity. The reason I’m mentioning this is because as a general rule, recruiters do not want to know about your status in a protected class, if it is not relevant, or at all, because we don’t want you to think we’re considering something prohibited in our analysis of your employment. So just like you wouldn’t say my religion is x. You would not say overtly, my sexual orientation is x because some recruiters will go, Well, no, no, no, no, I don’t want to hear that. Because they don’t want you to think that’s part of my analysis, Are there times where it’s appropriate to disclose that? Sure. Especially for instance, if you’re being asked about after the hire and the job offer is made, you’re being asked about a uniform to wear. And part of your transition to the different gender includes changing how you will present at work. That is an appropriate time to discuss your gender identity, and how you will present in that job. But it’s way after the resume way after the interview. It’s at the time of a job offer, when that is now a topic that’s important to cover. Because you should be your own authentic self at work, you should be comfortable. I’ll predicate all of that by saying, do your research well in advance to make sure you’re only applying at organizations where not only will they obey the law of which it is now the law of the land not to discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity, but where they embrace the LGBTQ community and actively demonstrate a participation in it and support of it. There’s one thing to say, yeah, we’re an equal opportunity employer on the website. It’s another thing to talk to people in that organization, and to do some research about what that organization is actually doing, which is part of what I like about what you’re doing. And our Bureau is to provide more details and supporting evidence, if you will, of a company’s LGBTQ inclusion practices and actual footpri

Unknown Speaker 33:26
t. Absolutely. So I really like how

Unknown Speaker 33:31
ou conveyed that there. You know, and, and, you know, just because an employer also, you know, is on the HRC, corporate Equality Index, they’re still discrimination. They’re still discrimination lawsuits and litigation cases or arbitration cases that go on. So, you know, unfortunately, we really can’t just take that as an example which only covers the fortune 1000. So if you’re going for a government job or working at a mid sized company or working at a university, that’s even, even though they’ve been doing that for over 16 years, they’ve never branched beyond at the fortune 1000. So that’s where to end. You know, the out firoz group was just featured on LinkedIn, a nice shout out for the LGBT community. Thank you LinkedIn for that. much appreciate it. But then even in the group, you know, has limitations on LinkedIn, it’s you can’t search unless you pay LinkedIn for a recruiter level or Sales Navigator level membership. You can even within the group search other members who say work at a particular employer. So you know, oh, I want to work at x company, or ex employer. And so I’m a member of the group and I want to go search for other members of the out euro group to go talk with those employers. LinkedIn does not have that feature. So it becomes very difficult. And I’ll say for hours and day in first starting the out bureau comm site that’s o UT, you are calm. Even searching companies that I knew were were very, very inclusive and so forth and had didn’t have a, you know, any legal issues going on to my knowledge, at least the year prior, even googling them trying to search for LGBT related content was difficult, because the vast majority of employers even though they might have a very active employee resource group for the LGBT employees, even though they might participate in pride in a New York, Atlanta, Orlando, Miami Li etc even though they might, you know, sponsor LGBT owned businesses, even though they might sponsor LGBT nonprofits it’s very difficult to find that information so I hear you and that it’s it’s like whoa do your research and try to understand that they’re a really you know, inclusive and embrace it employer but it is darn difficult to do th

Unknown Speaker 36:29
t. Yeah, I th

Unknown Speaker 36:31
nk so that is that is where that that was the impetus for out bureau comm is seeing those gaps and those difficulties. So number one, this is my little call to action for everyone out there is to join out bureau.com so that you can search for other members very easily. Out bureau does not have the limitations that LinkedIn has forced on you because they’re they’re trying to force you to pay the hundred dollars a month or more for the recruiter or the Sales Navigator. role, even though you’re just an employee, you’re just looking for other people in an organization. Okay? So the more of you that join out bureau.com Place your professional profile, you will be there for others who are seeking you. Additionally, you’re able to provide a rating review, anonymously, on your current and recent past employers. So I think that’s very important because even providing that, you know, my employer is fantastic. There’s one review and I’ll give a shout out as to it Intel. There’s one review on the website right now by a transgender person. She clearly indicates that in the review, and just gloats how what a wonderful employer that is. And then there’s others that don’t sign that that great. Now, over time that you know, let’s be, you know, honest, every organization is made up employees. So even a very larger organization of, say, 100,000 employees, as I like to think of the, the doubt, yes, we have the laws, and I’ll get to that in a moment. But you know, policies and so forth are really the intent of the company, the intent of the employer, because they don’t control every employee 24 724 seven of the day in the week in the year, right. And if we even just take sexual harassment, which I’ve used this example many times, but even raised, you know, just by taking sexual harassment, it’s been illegal, just like now it’s illegal to discriminate against LGBT people based on sexual orientation and gender identity. If we just take sexual harassment As Case in point well, that’s been illegal for for 40 years, but sexual harassment still happens. And in employers of say 50 employees or larger, every before you can come to work, you have to sign off that, you know, it’s it’s bad to do sexual harassment, you have annual training on sexual harassment to ensure it’s See ya. And but it still happens. And so, yes, this is fantastic that the Supreme Court has made this, you know, illegal to discriminate based on sexual orientation and gender identity. But don’t think for a second that it just automatically makes every employer a, you know, rainbow flag waving unicorn loving place, right. But yeah, it’s you know, yeah. And you even look at employers like, again, this is public knowledge. It’s, it’s out there, so I’m not trying to beat them up, but it’s just reality. Look at Goldman Sachs. So Goldman Sachs has been on The HRC corporate Equality Index is ranked 100% for numerous years, and for several years in a row in a row, including 2020 20 was named one of the top employers in the financial sector based on HRC corporate Equality Index, however, they just finished a What is it called going through a lawsuit and settled for a discrimination suit. And so again, I’m not trying to beat them up here, but it’s just reality in that, you know, you can’t just look at the that any Equality Index around the globe, they’re all modeled after HRC. So you just can’t look at that and say, Oh, I’m, I’m, you know, because they’re on that list, they’re automatically going to be a fantastic 100% amazing place to work and I can just walk in with just, you know, yeah, you want the space to

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