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IDC FutureScape: Top 10 Predictions for the Future of Work

NEEDHAM, Mass.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–#AIML–The Future of Work predictions from International Data Corporation (IDC) signal an enduring adoption of hybrid work models by a majority of G2000 organizations, supported by broad adoption of automation and artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI/ML) technologies.

To keep pace with accelerating digital transformation initiatives and the realities of global health, climate, and social challenges, organizations must adopt more dynamic and hybrid ways of working. Workers must redefine themselves as members of dynamic and reconfigurable teams that can adapt quickly to business demands and new market requirements – anytime, anywhere, and from any physical location.

Driven by senior executives and executive boards, Future of Work initiatives will be enterprise-wide imperatives. Rapid adoption of more automated, cloud-based, and AI-enabled work practices will improve work productivity and introduce new, more agile ways of working. The insights gained from these digital-first ways of working will enable organizations to respond to the needs of customers and employees, driving improvements in employee retention and customer satisfaction.

“As organizations continue to define and refine work models best suited for their industries, they inevitably will need to calibrate the right deployment of automation, digital and physical workspace, and place technologies,” said Amy Loomis, research director, Future of Work. “Far from being a means to an end, deployment of these technologies is sparking new leadership conversations around empowering workers to be more autonomous and innovative working with IT, across functions and with clients.”

IDC’s Future of Work 2022 top 10 predictions are:

  • Prediction 1: By 2024, 80% of the G2000 will use AI/ML-enabled “digital managers” to hire, fire, and train workers in jobs measured by continuous improvement, but only 1 of 5 will realize value without human engagement.
  • Prediction 2: By 2023, G2000 line of business employees will use tools to automate their own work using codeless development, but 90% of these programs will fail without supporting COE and adoption methodology.
  • Prediction 3: 40% of the G2000 will see a 25% improvement in information usage by 2026 due to investments in intelligent knowledge networks that turn structured/unstructured data into findable and actionable knowledge.
  • Prediction 4: By 2023, digital transformation (DX) and business volatility will drive 70% of G2000 organizations to deploy remote or hybrid-first work models, redefining work processes and engaging diverse talent pools.
  • Prediction 5: 70% of enterprise businesses will have extensively invested in diversity, equality, and inclusion data, tools, and benchmarking by 2024 to define recruitment and human capital strategies.
  • Prediction 6: By 2023, 60% of G2000 businesses will deploy AI- and ML-enabled platforms to support the entire employee life-cycle experience from onboarding through retirement.
  • Prediction 7: DX-related IT skills shortages will affect 90% of organizations by 2025, costing over $6.5 trillion globally through 2025 due to delayed product releases, reduced customer satisfaction, and loss of business.
  • Prediction 8: By 2025, 90% of new commercial constructions/renovations will deploy smart facility technology supporting flexible workplaces and sustainably improving occupant experiences and operational performance.
  • Prediction 9: By 2023, 70% of connected workers in task-based roles will use intelligence embedded in adaptive digital workspaces from anywhere to engage clients/colleagues and drive enterprise productivity.
  • Prediction 10: G1000 firms will use intelligent digital workspaces with augmented visual technologies (hardware/software) in 8:10 regularly scheduled meetings by 2024 to enable high-performance distributed global teams.

These predictions are discussed in greater detail in a new IDC FutureScape report, IDC FutureScape: Worldwide Future of Work 2022 Predictions, (IDC #US47290521), which is available for download at: https://www.idc.com/events/futurescape?tab=latest-research.

The Future of Work predictions were also presented in a webinar hosted by Amy Loomis and featuring IDC Group Vice President Sandra Ng. Details and registration for an on-demand replay of the webinar can be found at: https://goto.webcasts.com/starthere.jsp?ei=1488683&tp_key=e6617ef757.

Finally, IDC has published a blog which further explores the implications of this year’s Future of Connectedness predictions. The blog can be found at: https://blogs.idc.com/2021/11/18/idc-futurescape-worldwide-future-of-work-2022-predictions/.

About IDC FutureScape

IDC FutureScape reports are used to shape IT strategy and planning for the enterprise by providing a basic framework for evaluating IT initiatives in terms of their value to business strategy now and in the foreseeable future. IDC’s FutureScapes are comprised of a set of decision imperatives designed to identify a range of pending issues that CIOs and senior technology professionals will confront within the typical 3-year business planning cycle.

To learn more about IDC FutureScape reports for 2022, please visit: https://www.idc.com/events/futurescape.

About IDC’s Future of Work Practice

As organizations accelerate and expand digital transformation initiatives, traditional work models are no longer sufficiently nimble, adaptive, or scalable. IDC’s Future of Work research practice helps organizations recognize the necessity of moving to work models that support an increasingly diverse, distributed, and dynamic workforce securely, effectively, and productively. To learn more about IDC’s Future of Work research practice, please visit https://www.idc.com/promo/future-of-x/work.

About IDC

International Data Corporation (IDC) is the premier global provider of market intelligence, advisory services, and events for the information technology, telecommunications, and consumer technology markets. With more than 1,100 analysts worldwide, IDC offers global, regional, and local expertise on technology, IT benchmarking and sourcing, and industry opportunities and trends in over 110 countries. IDC’s analysis and insight helps IT professionals, business executives, and the investment community to make fact-based technology decisions and to achieve their key business objectives. Founded in 1964, IDC is a wholly owned subsidiary of International Data Group (IDG), the world’s leading tech media, data, and marketing services company. To learn more about IDC, please visit www.idc.com. Follow IDC on Twitter at @IDC and LinkedIn. Subscribe to the IDC Blog for industry news and insights.

Contacts

Michael Shirer

press@idc.com
508-935-4200

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Major US Healthcare Labor Shortages Projected in Every State by 2026, Mental Health Professionals Grow in High Demand, Mercer Report Shows

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Even before COVID-19, the US healthcare labor market faced remarkable challenges with the demand for healthcare professionals outpacing supply. As the US continues to grapple with the pandemic, those healthcare professionals will get stretched further. Mercer’s “2021 External Healthcare Labor Market Analysis” released today identifies four key trends impacting the US healthcare labor market over the next five and ten years, and reveals how the healthcare industry needs to adapt to address future labor shortages.

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“The healthcare workforce is burned-out following a nearly two-year face-off against COVID-19. The demands placed on healthcare workers since the start of the pandemic have been unrelenting and overall, this data shows that there will not be enough healthcare workers to fill demand in the near future,” said John Derse, Healthcare Industry Leader, Mercer. “This impact will be felt by all of us, regardless of where we live or our field of work.”

The exact deficit depends on the specific role and geography, but a few common themes emerge: the US is losing healthcare professionals to burnout and at a rate faster than expected, a significant portion of physicians plan to retire, and there will be a sharp increase in demand for mental health professionals and low-wage healthcare workers in the near term. Every state is different, and every healthcare system should assess how anticipated projections to their external labor markets will ultimately affect workforce strategies and patient outcomes in the coming years.

1. There will be a shortage of healthcare workers at the low-end of the wage spectrum, which will directly impact access to home care

About 9.7M individuals currently work in critical, albeit lower-wage, healthcare occupations (e.g., medical assistants, home health aides, nursing assistants, etc.). The need for these workers is likely to grow in the coming years, as the aging population will increase demand for healthcare workers while healthcare labor is permanently leaving these occupations. In fact, Mercer’s research shows more than 6.5M individuals will permanently leave this critical workforce in the near future. The result – a substantial shortage of workers in the next five years. New York and California will have the largest labor shortages of this workforce, each projected to fall short by over 500,000 workers by 2026. Only a few states in the country are projected to have surplus labor in low-wage healthcare workers, including Washington, Georgia and South Carolina.

2. Primary care will increasingly be provided by non-physicians

The primary care landscape and how primary care services are delivered is anticipated to change over the next five years as 21% of family medicine, pediatric and OB/GYN, and other primary care physicians will move into retirement age. Yet, demand for primary care physicians will grow by over 4% during the same time period. The result will be a shift towards primary care being provided by physicians’ assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs).

3. There will be significant shortages of nurses in over half of US states, but surplus in some areas of the South and Southwest

Just over 3M individuals work as registered nurses in the US and demand for these professionals will grow by at least 5% over the next five years. With nearly 1M workers expected to permanently leave the profession, over half of US states will not be able to fill demand for nursing talent. The largest projected shortages of nursing talent will be in Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Colorado, Illinois, and Massachusetts. However, in the South and Southwest, new entrants into the local nursing workforce are likely to outpace local demand due to new graduates and historical migration patterns. States like Georgia, Texas and South Carolina may start to build a surplus of registered nurses in the workforce.

4. A hiring rush for mental health providers will emerge by 2026

There will be a 10% increase in demand for mental health workers by 2026. During this time, 400,000 are anticipated to leave the occupation entirely, resulting in twenty-seven states that will be unable to meet hiring demands for skilled and semi-skilled mental health workers. While Massachusetts, Illinois, Pennsylvania, California, and Colorado are expected to have the largest shortages of these professionals, Washington, Texas, Ohio, Florida, and Georgia will each build surplus due to a steady flow of new entrants and that individuals in these regions are leaving mental health occupations at a slower rate than in other states.

“While hospitals and healthcare systems cannot control what’s happening in the external labor market, effective workforce planning and managing internal workforces can help mitigate their exposure to these risks. Workforce strategies that will position an employer for long-term success should focus on transforming care models, rethink compensation and benefits, and introduce more flexibility into staffing, development and rewards,” added Derse. “Prior to the pandemic, the shortages were driven by a healthcare population that was trending older, sicker and more sedentary. Employers should not wait to transform their retention models to accommodate for all demographics in their workforce impacted by the pandemic, particularly ageing skilled professionals considering early retirement.”

Click here to see an interactive map of US healthcare labor projections over five years across six types of healthcare providers.

About the 2021 External Healthcare Labor Market Analysis

Based on Mercer research, publicly available data, and data provided by Emsi, the 2021 External Healthcare Labor Market Analysis examined the changing healthcare labor markets of the next five to ten years in all 50 states at the country, state, regional and national levels. The interactive map here features a small subset of the healthcare workforce at a broad geographic level and insights from Mercer and other Marsh McLennan businesses on the proprietary database of over 80 healthcare roles, projected over 10 years at the county and metropolitan statistical area level. If you’d like to learn more, click here.

About Mercer

Mercer believes in building brighter futures by redefining the world of work, reshaping retirement and investment outcomes, and unlocking real health and well-being. Mercer’s approximately 25,000 employees are based in 43 countries and the firm operates in 130 countries. Mercer is a business of Marsh McLennan (NYSE: MMC), the world’s leading professional services firm in the areas of risk, strategy and people, with 78,000 colleagues and annual revenue of over $18 billion. Through its market-leading businesses including Marsh, Guy Carpenter and Oliver Wyman, Marsh McLennan helps clients navigate an increasingly dynamic and complex environment. For more information, visit mercer.com. Follow Mercer on LinkedIn and Twitter.

About Marsh McLennan

Marsh McLennan (NYSE: MMC) is the world’s leading professional services firm in the areas of risk, strategy and people. The Company’s 78,000 colleagues advise clients in 130 countries. With annual revenue over $18 billion, Marsh McLennan helps clients navigate an increasingly dynamic and complex environment through four market-leading businesses. Marsh provides data-driven risk advisory services and insurance solutions to commercial and consumer clients. Guy Carpenter develops advanced risk, reinsurance and capital strategies that help clients grow profitably and pursue emerging opportunities. Mercer delivers advice and technology-driven solutions that help organizations redefine the world of work, reshape retirement and investment outcomes, and unlock health and well being for a changing workforce. Oliver Wyman serves as a critical strategic, economic and brand advisor to private sector and governmental clients. For more information, visit mmc.com, follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter or subscribe to BRINK.

Contacts

Micaela McPadden
201-694-9719

Micaela.mcpadden@mercer.com

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New Report: 67% of Employees Who Are Ready to Resign Think Employers Have Not Fulfilled Pandemic Promises Around Mental Health and Well-Being

‘Employee Stress Check 2021’ Report By Talkspace for Business and The Harris Poll Finds More than 40% of American Employees are Likely to Change Jobs to Resolve Stress; One in Four Believe Their Physical Health Has Suffered

Nearly 60% of Employees Believe that Supportive Management, Strong Social Office Culture, Mentorship, and More Mental Health Services Can Improve Retention

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Talkspace (NASDAQ: TALK), a leading online behavioral healthcare company, today released the ‘Employee Stress Check 2021 Report,’ a nationwide survey by Talkspace for Business with The Harris Poll that explores current employee attitudes toward mental well-being and work. The survey of more than 1,000 full-time employees in the United States found that while many have spoken about a great resignation, there is a period of “great reflection” that comes first, one in which chronic stress finally triggers an employee to seek immediate resolution. Talkspace for Business sought to understand the experiences that lead to resignation and what employees and therapists think companies should be doing to better tackle stress. The report details key stress drivers, the impacts of chronic stress, demographic comparisons, and helpful interventions cited by employees and therapists.

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Employers across the U.S. are working hard to modernize the employee experience, yet the cultural shift is immense. As the workplace becomes more complex in regards to employee locations and needs, it is critical for companies to become proficient in recognizing new warning signs of stress and disengagement. In fact, the report found two out of every three employees considering leaving their jobs agree that their employer has not followed through on their early pandemic promises to focus on mental health. Other key takeaways from the survey include:

  • Two of every three employees (67%) who consider leaving their job agree that their employer has not followed through on early pandemic promises to focus on employee mental health. 68% of potential quitters said, “my employer [said] employees should focus on ‘self-care’ but doesn’t provide the resources to do so.”
  • 41% of all American employees are likely to consider a job change to resolve stress. Employees are bypassing helpful company policies, such as changing teams or short-term leaves, in favor of resignation.
  • Nearly 1 in 4 employees believe their physical health has suffered because of their job and at least 25% are underperforming regularly due to stress.
  • Employees under 35 and working mothers are having greater reactions to stress and are most likely to change jobs or careers, or quit in the next six months.
  • Although 52% of all employees report burnout, less than 20% of them are using the company benefits they believe are “most helpful” for mental health. This signals that employees may not be fully aware of what’s available, or may not feel comfortable taking advantage of certain benefits.
  • Nearly 60% of employees believe that supportive management can improve retention. “A manager that prioritizes mental health” is more highly ranked by employees than both a strong office culture and mentorship.
  • Employees want more than pay – six of the top ten reasons employees would stay at a job are connected with management, leadership, and culture across all demographics.

“The data is clear: employees are struggling to find healthy coping mechanisms to manage chronic stress,” said Dr. Varun Choudhary, MD, MA, DFAPA, Chief Medical Officer of Talkspace. “This new study suggests that employee well-being is shaped by many varying experiences — from managerial relationships to workplace policies, and available mental health and wellbeing resources. It’s critical that employers pay attention to pain points and implement effective solutions that counteract chronic stress, enhance workplace culture and improve retention.”

Talkspace commissioned the survey with The Harris Poll. Fieldwork was conducted from July 29 to August 2 among 1,015 full-time employed adults aged 18+ in the United States. For complete survey methodology, including weighting variables and subgroup sample sizes, please contact jkim@skdknick.com.

To learn more about the findings of the report, read the Employee Stress Check 2021 Report from Talkspace for Business.

About Talkspace

Talkspace (NASDAQ: TALK) is the leading virtual behavioral healthcare company committed to making care more effective, accessible, and convenient. Talkspace addresses the challenges of traditional mental healthcare by combining effective clinical solutions with technology designed for how we live today. The platform is powered by a diverse team of certified mental health specialists in every state providing therapy and psychiatric treatment for individuals, couples, and adolescents. Talkspace therapists meet clients where they are, on their schedules, on any device, via chat, voice, and video. All care is delivered through an easy-to-use and fully encrypted web and mobile platform, consistent with HIPAA and other state regulatory requirements. More than two million people have used Talkspace.

Talkspace for Business, the enterprise division of Talkspace, now covers more than 55 million lives. Existing relationships include leading employers, schools, and the nation’s largest health care plans, including an in-network provider agreement with Cigna.

For more information about Talkspace commercial relationships, visit https://business.talkspace.com/. To learn more about online therapy, please visit: https://www.talkspace.com/online-therapy. To learn more about Talkspace Psychiatry, please https://www.talkspace.com/psychiatry.

About The Harris Poll

The Harris Poll is one of the longest-running surveys in the U.S. tracking public opinion, motivations, and social sentiment since 1963 that is now part of Harris Insights & Analytics, a global consulting and market research firm that delivers social intelligence for transformational times. We work with clients in three primary areas; building twenty-first-century corporate reputation, crafting brand strategy and performance tracking, and earning organic media through public relations research. Our mission is to provide insights and advisory to help leaders make the best decisions possible. To learn more, please visit www.theharrispoll.com.

Contacts

John Kim | jkim@skdknick.com | 310.997.5963

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Employee Exhaustion: The Hartford Survey Finds Widening Gap In Burnout Rates Of Women And Men; Burned-Out U.S. Workers More Likely To Seek New Jobs

  • As burnout levels for U.S. workers remain high, Americans want their employers to provide additional time off and flexibility
  • More than one-third of U.S. workers are likely to search for a job in the next six months

HARTFORD, Conn.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–New research from The Hartford, a leading provider of employee benefits and absence management, found a widening gap between men and women in workplace burnout rates, as the overall exhaustion level remains at 61% – the same high level reported in February. Burned-out U.S. workers were also more likely to look for a new job, the national survey showed.

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“This high level of burnout and growing gap for women should be cause for alarm for business leaders,” said Jonathan Bennett, head of Employee Benefits at The Hartford. “The need for flexibility in the workplace has never been greater as the lines between work and home continue to be blurred amid the pandemic. Fostering an open, inclusive work environment that provides flexibility is an important step in addressing burnout and helping employees remain productive at work.”

The Hartford’s July 2021 Future of Benefits Pulse Survey found 68% of female U.S. workers now report experiencing burnout at work, compared to 52% of male workers – a 16-percentage point difference. This marks a significant increase in the difference between genders compared to The Hartford’s February survey, when there was a nine-point gap in workplace burnout rates between women and men (66% vs. 57%, respectively). Recent research found working mothers have been grappling with a “double shift” of household responsibilities, mental health challenges, and a more difficult remote-work experience.

The Hartford’s latest survey showed the more burnout employees are experiencing, the more likely they are to look for a new job. Of the workers who say they are “extremely likely” to look for a new job in the next six months, 55% say they “always feel burned out” and 16% say they “often feel burned out.”

The July survey also found 37% of U.S. workers are likely to search for a job in the next six months. The top three factors motivating the job search included:

  • Better salary or wages: 74%
  • Career growth/promotion: 44%
  • Tie between better benefits through their employer: 38%; more flexible schedule: 38%; better workplace culture: 38%

For the 63% of employees who don’t plan to search for a job in the next six months, the top three factors keeping them on the job included:

  • Salary or wages: 66%
  • Benefits through their employer: 58%
  • Flexible schedule: 43%

“The pandemic has changed the workplace – including the hiring landscape – and once again elevating employee benefits and a flexible work culture as critical elements to attracting and retaining talent. I encourage employers to take a fresh look at their benefit plans to ensure they remain competitive,” Bennett said.

To help address workplace burnout, U.S. workers surveyed said they want their employers offer the following:

  • Additional paid time off: 22%
  • Condensed four-day work week: 22%
  • Schedule flexibility: 17%
  • Remote work options: 13%
  • Company-wide mental health days: 13%
  • Lighter workload: 12%

The Hartford’s claims data demonstrates untreated mental health and substance use disorders can lead to unplanned absences and prolonged disability. Mental health conditions are among the top five reasons for U.S. workers to file a short-term disability claim, according to The Hartford’s disability claims data (excluding pregnancy).1 The Hartford partners with the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) to help employers and employees reduce stigma in the workplace and encourage those with mental health conditions to seek support.

Methodology

A national omnibus online survey was conducted in the U.S. among approximately 2,000 adults aged 18+, including 966 full-time and part-time employed respondents. The research was conducted July 27-30, 2021. The margin of error is +/- 3% at a 95% confidence level.

About The Hartford

The Hartford is a leader in property and casualty insurance, group benefits and mutual funds. With more than 200 years of expertise, The Hartford is widely recognized for its service excellence, sustainability practices, trust and integrity. More information on the company and its financial performance is available at https://www.thehartford.com. Follow us on Twitter at @TheHartford_PR.

The Hartford Financial Services Group, Inc., (NYSE: HIG) operates through its subsidiaries under the brand name, The Hartford, and is headquartered in Hartford, Connecticut. For additional details, please read The Hartford’s legal notice.

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Some of the statements in this release may be considered forward-looking statements as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. We caution investors that these forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance, and actual results may differ materially. Investors should consider the important risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ. These important risks and uncertainties include those discussed in our 2020 Annual Report on Form 10-K, subsequent Quarterly Reports on Forms 10-Q, and the other filings we make with the Securities and Exchange Commission. We assume no obligation to update this release, which speaks as of the date issued.

From time to time, The Hartford may use its website and/or social media outlets, such as Twitter and Facebook, to disseminate material company information. Financial and other important information regarding The Hartford is routinely accessible through and posted on our website at https://ir.thehartford.com, Twitter account at www.twitter.com/TheHartford_PR and Facebook at https://facebook.com/thehartford. In addition, you may automatically receive email alerts and other information about The Hartford when you enroll your email address by visiting the “Email Alerts” section at https://ir.thehartford.com.

1 Top five reasons for short-term claims for the last four years (2016-2020), excluding pregnancy, were musculoskeletal injury, cancers and other neoplasms, digestive conditions, and mental health conditions

Contacts

Media Contact:
Michelle Symington

860-547-5385

michelle.symington@thehartford.com

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Employer Support Has a Direct Impact on the Health and Resilience of Employees, According to a Mercer Survey

  • The pandemic has had a material impact on the mental, financial and physical health of employees.

    • Over half of US employees report feeling some level of stress in the last year, nearly one fourth say they experienced mental health issues such as depression or anxiety, a fifth are financially worse off, and nearly a fifth feel less physically healthy or fit.
  • However, 53% of employees feel their employer has provided good support during the pandemic – and, compared to those who have received little support, they are less likely to have experienced the pandemic’s impact as mostly or entirely negative.
  • 45% of employees who feel they have received good support from their employers during the pandemic say they are less likely to leave their company as a result.

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–As the pandemic continues to unfold, the ability of employers to have a positive impact on employee health and resiliency cannot be understated and is one of the most important findings of the latest Mercer “Health on Demand” survey released today. Since the onset of COVID-19, when employers stepped up to provide essential support, it made a difference. Employees who say they received good support from their employers are much less likely to view their personal experience of the pandemic as mostly or entirely negative compared to those who received little or no support – 25% vs. 49%. And almost half (45%) of those receiving good support say they are less likely to leave their job as a result.

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Survey results confirm that the pandemic has had a material impact on the mental, physical and financial health of employees. Over half of US employees feel some level of stress in the last year; nearly a fourth of US employees say they experienced mental health issues such as depression or anxiety; a fifth are financially worse off; and nearly a fifth feel less physically healthy or fit. Low-wage earners were more likely to experience each of these negative impacts – and less likely to feel supported by their employers during the pandemic. These findings reinforce that employers have room for improvement when it comes to understanding the diverse needs of their employees and providing resources to support the well-being of the entire workforce.

“There is nothing more important to the health of a business than the health of its people and the communities in which that business operates. COVID-19 challenged our global healthcare system, but the ability of employers to have a positive impact on employee health and resiliency is one of the most important findings from our 2021 Health on Demand survey,” said Martine Ferland, President and CEO, Mercer. “The research is clear – employers that place health and humanity at the center of business transformation will build a more energized and adaptable workforce that is better able to persevere through periods of crisis.”

The 2021 report lays out several key findings and implications for supporting employee health and well-being:

Provide varied and valued benefits: Well-being is at the core of an employee’s relationship with their employer. The amount of support, type of support, and ability to personalize that support matters. The ability to customize a package of benefits to meet individual needs is highly or extremely valued by 55% of employees. Variety matters as well: the more benefits and resources that are offered, the more likely it is that each employee finds something of value. Of employees offered 10 or more health and well-being benefits or resources by their employer, 52% say that their benefits are a reason to stay with their company, compared to only 32% of those offered 1-5 benefits or resources. In addition, employees receiving 10 or more benefits are more confident that they can afford the healthcare they need – and more likely to agree that their employer cares about their health and well-being.

Enable digital access to healthcare: COVID-19 necessitated that healthcare be delivered in different and innovative ways. One-fifth of employees used telemedicine for the first time during the pandemic, and another 23% increased their usage. Of those trying telemedicine for the first time, the great majority – 72% – intend to keep using it. The survey also registered a sharp increase in employee interest in other digital health solutions, ranging from apps that help find healthcare providers to virtual reality tools for self-care. Compared to the 2019 Health on Demand survey, a greater percentage of employees in the 2021 survey found digital solutions to be highly or extremely valuable. The ability to access care virtually has gained momentum and become a valued option for employees. Survey results reinforce that employers need to plan for a future in which most healthcare journeys include virtual visits and digital healthcare supports.

Reduce stress and anxiety: Notably, US employees are more stressed than those in many other countries. While 59% of US employees say they feel some level of stress, one-quarter report being highly or extremely stressed. That’s the highest percentage of the 13 countries included in the survey. In the UK, for example, only 16% of employees feel highly or extremely stressed. With 48% of US employees rating employer support for mental health as highly or extremely valuable, employers that provide robust mental health and counselling benefits will foster greater loyalty and create a stronger bond with their employees. However, 40% of employees say it is difficult to find and access quality mental health care. It’s even harder for some employees: among low wage earners, that number rises to 47%. Employees identifying as LGBTQ+ place the highest value on employer support for mental health – 61% say it is highly or extremely valuable, but nearly as many (58%) say quality mental health care is difficult to find and access.

Clearly, employees have unmet needs when it comes to mental health care. Half (49%) of all US employees say that programs that reduce the cost of mental health treatment are highly or extremely valuable. Employers looking to provide affordable mental health care support should note that many employees would highly value virtual counselling via video chat with a therapist (42%), virtual counselling via text with a therapist (38%), and even virtual mental health advice via AI-powered text chats, with no human involved (31%).

Tackle healthcare inequities: Healthcare inequality persists, with higher-earners better able to access medical coverage, income protection and mental health counselling than low-earners. Participants with household income (HHI) at or below the US median are significantly less likely to feel confident they can afford the healthcare their family needs (60%) than those with HHI above the median (83%).

Unfortunately, the people who need support the most are the least likely to receive it. Those with HHI above the median reported having better access to benefits through their employers: the survey revealed a gap of 21 percentage points in access to employer-sponsored medical coverage between those with HHI at or below the median and those with HHI above the median and a 19-point gap in access to life insurance. Employers should consider a strategy that targets benefits to the groups that need them most. In a time of labor shortages, a strategy for achieving greater equity may also give employers a competitive advantage.

“Every good leader knows that when employees feel they are treated well they are more likely to stay, be engaged, and flourish,” said Kate Brown, Mercer’s Center for Health Innovation Leader, “With significant shifts in attitudes towards mental health, sustainability and digital healthcare over the last year, employers must evolve their health strategy to reflect a modern workforce that prioritizes flexibility, choice, a caring culture, and digital access to support their health and well-being.”

About the survey

The 2021 Mercer Health on Demand survey asked 14,000 employees across 13 countries across the globe about what they want when it comes to their health and well-being. Country and regional results were weighted to the true sample, with 2,000 in the US. The resulting report captures the voice of the employee to inform debate about employee health and wellbeing preferences, digital delivery of benefits, inclusive and environmentally-friendly solutions that meet ESG agendas and mental health solutions.

About Mercer

Mercer believes in building brighter futures by redefining the world of work, reshaping retirement and investment outcomes, and unlocking real health and well-being. Mercer’s approximately 25,000 employees are based in 43 countries and the firm operates in 130 countries. Mercer is a business of Marsh McLennan (NYSE: MMC), the world’s leading professional services firm in the areas of risk, strategy and people, with 78,000 colleagues and annual revenue of over $18 billion. Through its market-leading businesses including Marsh, Guy Carpenter and Oliver Wyman, Marsh McLennan helps clients navigate an increasingly dynamic and complex environment. For more information, visit mercer.com. Follow Mercer on LinkedIn and Twitter.

Contacts

Micaela McPadden
201-694-9719

Micaela.mcpadden@mercer.com

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Navigate Wellbeing & Fringe Partner to Fight Employee Burnout & Turnover

Joint solution brings joy and wellness to over 1.5M people around the world as burnout rates reach unprecedented levels

RICHMOND, Va.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Today, Navigate Wellbeing Solutions, the national provider of employee engagement and wellbeing solutions for organizations, together with lifestyle benefits company Fringe announced they are joining forces to improve employee engagement, happiness, and wellbeing amidst skyrocketing burnout rates.

Navigate is a purpose-driven employee engagement technology company that aims to spark a cascade of positive change for employees’ health and wellbeing. The company assists organizations by connecting their business goals, purpose, and values with wellbeing opportunities for employees, motivating and incentivizing them to put their health and wellbeing first. Navigate will be leveraging Fringe’s lifestyle benefits marketplace to provide customers with more meaningful, personalized rewards that support people’s near and long-term wellbeing journey. Fringe’s all-in-one platform features over 130 different apps and services that spark joy and bring immediate value to peoples’ lives, including Instacart, Netflix, Bouqs, Shipt, Turo and more.

Burnout — officially recognized as a clinical syndrome by the World Health Organization in 2019 — is an increasing threat to the mental and physical health of employee populations, only exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. A recent study by Indeed shows that employee burnout is at an all-time high: 67% of respondents believe that burnout has worsened over the course of the pandemic. Another study by Guardian shows that, “70% of employees strongly agree: ‘I am more likely to be loyal to a company that offers me employee benefits that are personalized to my needs.’”

Through the many challenges of the past eighteen months, Navigate and Fringe are supporting the overall wellbeing of employees by providing lifestyle benefits to meet everyday needs: from mental health support to deliveries to fitness classes. In a survey of its users, Fringe found that 8 in 10 employees believe the company’s lifestyle benefits have increased their loyalty to their company.

“Employers across the U.S. are looking for more meaningful ways to show their team members they’re valued — whether those employees are new to the workforce and getting support for student loans, coming back from delivering a baby and accessing postpartum return-to-work assistance, or caregivers looking to support aging parents,” said Troy Vincent, Founder and CEO of Navigate Wellbeing. “Navigate is proud to partner with Fringe to bring together a first-of-its-kind personalized engagement solution that gives employees the ability to choose the lifestyle benefits that are the most meaningful for them – all in one platform.”

“With rampant pandemic burnout, employee happiness and wellbeing has never been more critical, both for the health of the employee and the employer,” said Jordan Peace, Co-founder and CEO, Fringe. “We’re thrilled to be partnering with Navigate to bring personal, meaningful benefits to their customers’ employees so they can reclaim their joy – both at home and at work.”

As a result of this partnership, the companies together are making a positive impact on the lives of over 1.5M users currently on the Navigate platform and the HR benefits administrators that are working every day to make those employees’ lives better. The joint solution will be available this fall for customers within the Navigate Wellbeing ecosystem.

About Navigate Wellbeing Solutions

Navigate is a purpose-driven employee engagement technology company helping organizations spark positive change in the employees, clients, and communities they serve. Navigate’s platform brings all aspects of health and happiness together with a single point of entry to a comprehensive engagement and benefits ecosystem. For over 10 years, Navigate has assisted organizations nation-wide across thirteen different industries by connecting their business goals, mission and values with tailored wellbeing solutions for their teams. Navigate is headquartered in West Des Moines, IA. For more information, visit https://www.navigatewell.com.

About Fringe

Fringe is the lifestyle benefits platform that is redefining employee perks and benefits for the new world of work. Offered through employers or partners, Fringe’s all-in-one platform provides people with lifestyle benefits, wellness incentives, rewards and recognition, peer-to-peer giving, employee donations, recruiting incentives, and so much more. The first lifestyle benefits marketplace built for the flexible workplace, people can select from over 130 different apps and services that spark joy and bring immediate value to their lives. For more information, visit https://www.fringe.us.

Contacts

Claudia Traverso

Fringe@strangebrewstrategies.com

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Employers Fear Effects of the “Great Resignation” as Millions of Workers Move On

But by giving staff the modern skills they need through career development, employers can boost staff retention

Questionmark PrimaryLogo

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–#Questionmark–Employers can beat the “great resignation”, whereby millions of workers plan to quit, by better understanding their people’s career development needs. Greater awareness of staff skills will lead to more relevant training and development and improve employee retention says Questionmark, the online assessment provider.

After eighteen months of staying put through economic uncertainty, huge numbers of employees are looking to leave for new jobs. In the United States alone, four million people quit their job in April.1

Some 41% of workers are considering quitting their job this year, according to a Microsoft survey of 30,000 global workers. Many (46%) of those are planning a career change.2 A separate study showed that 38% were keen to leave in the next six months.3

John Kleeman, Founder of Questionmark, said: “Too much staff turnover is bad for business. Lost productivity and knowledge alongside new hiring, training and onboarding fees add up to around a third of annual salary.4 And there is an impact to culture that it’s impossible to calculate.

“Too often, lack of career development is one of the main reasons people leave their job. If employers show that they can provide their people with meaningful development opportunities, and the modern skills they need, it will help them resist the ‘great resignation’.”

Questionmark explores five strategies for using staff assessments to boost retention in a new white paper: “Five Ways Assessments Can Help Retain Employees”.

By measuring an employee’s current skills through a staff assessment, employers can create a meaningful career development plan. With a good understanding of a team member’s strengths and weaknesses, leaders can deliver relevant training. This helps staff recognize that their current employer is serious about their development, and that they don’t need to look elsewhere for the next career step.

Employers can also create certification programs that help mark that career development. Assessing employee progress and awarding certificates creates immediate goals to work toward. It enables an employee to tangibly track their progress.

Questionmark has also released a white paper: “Five Ways Assessments Can Help Retain Employees”.

www.questionmark.com

Ends

Notes to editors

About Questionmark

Questionmark unlocks performance through reliable and secure online assessments.

Questionmark provides a secure enterprise-grade assessment platform and professional services to leading organizations around the world, delivered with care and unequalled expertise. Its full-service online assessment tool and professional services help customers to improve their performance and meet their compliance requirements. Questionmark enables organizations to unlock their potential by delivering assessments which are valid, reliable, fair and defensible.

Questionmark offers secure powerful integration with other LMS, LRS and proctoring services making it easy to bring everything together in one place. Questionmark’s cloud-based assessment management platform offers rapid deployment, scalability for high-volume test delivery, 24/7 support, and the peace-of-mind of secure, audited U.S., Australian and European-based data centers.

1 https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20210629-the-great-resignation-how-employers-drove-workers-to-quit
2 https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/worklab/work-trend-index/hybrid-work
3 https://hr.personio.de/hubfs/EN_Downloads/202104_HRStudy_UKI.pdf
4 https://www.ere.net/getting-ahead-of-the-looming-employee-exodus/

Contacts

For more information:

US: Kristin Bernor, external relations: Kristin.bernor@questionmark.com +1 203.349.6438

UK: Gareth Streeter: gareth.streeter@fourteenforty.uk +44 7734 251 496

Australia and New Zealand: Chelsea Dowd: chelsea.dowd@questionmark.com +61 2 8073 0527

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2,000 Employees Across 15+ Industries Reveal Bad Managers and Burnout Are Causing Them To Quit, Joining The Great Resignation; Hybrid Work Challenges and Poor Communication Are also Key Factors

The Predictive Index Surveyed Thousands of Employees To Find Out What Is Contributing To the Record Number of Open Jobs and To Give Business Leaders Insight Into the Challenges Ahead

BOSTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–#dreamteam–One of the biggest stories dominating headlines today is the record 9.2 million job openings available as millions of Americans quit en masse—better known as The Great Resignation. To uncover why people are leaving their jobs, The Predictive Index surveyed nearly 2,000 employees across 15+ industries in a new report published today, The 2021 People Management Report.

PMR Press Release

The report found that 48% of employees have thought about changing careers in the past 12 months, and 63% of those with a bad manager are thinking of leaving in the next 12 months.

“Even in today’s climate, attrition often has less to do with physical safety, and more to do with psychological safety,” said Jackie Dube, SVP of Talent Optimization at The Predictive Index. “For organizations to avoid The Great Resignation, they need to listen to their people and mount a Great Retention instead. Whether it’s the flexibility of working where they want, when they want, or the freedom to take time off and recharge, employees are placing a premium on workplace empathy.”

Key Findings:

The Chilling Effects of Burnout

  • Burnout is contagious. While 36% of respondents said they feel their manager is burned out, 40% said they feel burned out, and 45% said their team members seem burned out.
  • When asked if they agreed with the statement, “Many of my team members seem burned out at work,” 73% of people with burned-out managers agreed vs. just 22% of those with managers who aren’t burned out.

The Hybrid Work Disconnect

  • 46% of companies are adopting fully remote or hybrid work models moving forward.
  • Though 60% of employees work almost entirely on-site, only 49% actually want to.

Communication is #1

  • While manager communication was the second-most valued skill among respondents, it was the No. 1 skill they felt managers lack most. When compared to results from the previous report, communication shot up four spots on the list, from number five to number one.
  • When asked to select the top three skills managers lack, respondents chose effective communicator (18%), drives team morale (17%), and asks for feedback (17%).

A full copy of The 2021 People Management Report is available at: https://www.predictiveindex.com/2021-people-management-report/

About The Predictive Index

The Predictive Index (PI) is an award-winning talent optimization platform that aligns business strategy with people strategy for optimal business results. Sixty years of proven science, software, and a robust curriculum of insightful management workshops make PI the solution for any company looking to design great teams and culture, make objective hiring decisions, and inspire greatness in their people anywhere in the world. More than 8,000 clients use PI—including AstraZeneca, Blue Cross Blue Shield, TD Bank, LVMH, and Omni Hotels—across 142+ countries. Learn more at https://www.predictiveindex.com/.

Contacts

Media:
Jennifer Moebius (she/her)

VP of Marketing

The Predictive Index

1-800-832-8884

jmoebius@predictiveindex.com