BAI Survey of Financial Services Employees Shows Over a Third Feel the Pandemic Has Had a Negative Impact on Their Mental Health OutBuro lgbtq employess professionals networking online community

BAI Survey of Financial Services Employees Shows Over a Third Feel the Pandemic Has Had a Negative Impact on Their Mental Health

CHICAGO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Recent research by BAI, a nonprofit independent organization that delivers the financial services industry’s most actionable insights, reveals that while employees’ work/life balance has improved during the pandemic, their mental and physical health and work load have been negatively affected. HR leaders are taking note and looking at ways to preserve the positive impacts of the pandemic work environment, while helping employees work through the personal challenges they are facing.

BAI surveyed more than 250 financial services employees to better understand how the pandemic had affected their personal and professional lives. While the results on work/life balance were positive, the research showed a negative 37% net impact on mental health, a negative 13% net impact on physical health and a negative 22% net impact on workload.

“Increased remote work arrangements with more flexibility in where and when employees work has predictably had a positive impact on work/life balance,” said Karl Dahlgren, managing director at BAI. “However, for the long-term health and engagement of their employees, it is important for financial services leaders to better understand and act on other negative impacts from the pandemic.”

BAI hosted a Fireside Chat Webinar, “The Impact of the Pandemic on Financial Services Leaders,” to walk through the study and discuss how leaders can help employees with things like mental health and workload challenges. Participants included Catherine Garret, Senior Vice President, HR Operations, Technology and Compliance at Comerica Bank, and Dannielle Brown, Head of Employee Experience at M&T Bank. Moderated by Holly Hughes, Chief Marketing Officer at BAI, the discussion included real examples of how the participants are working to help their employees during these transitional times, including extending mental health services, monitoring employee workloads through analytics, and creating manager resources to help employees transition back to the office. The webinar was published November 9 and can be accessed on demand.

About BAI

As a nonprofit, independent organization, BAI has delivered the financial services industry’s most actionable insights for more than 95 years, helping leaders make smart business decisions every day. We provide in-depth, proprietary research to more than 40 of the top US banks, support more than 2,100 financial services organizations with compliance and professional development training, provide trusted, relevant thought leadership through BAI Banking Strategies reports, podcasts and webinars, and offer specialized events and programs. For more information, visit www.bai.org.

Contacts

Kendall Carwile

William Mills Agency

678-781-7224

[email protected]

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Employee Mental Health Issues Intensify

CHICAGO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–#mentalhealth–Employees’ mental health has become a serious issue in the workplace and employers face growing responsibility to stem the tide. According to a customer poll by ComPsych, the world’s largest provider of behavioral health and well-being services, 87 percent of employers say the mental health of their employees is their biggest well-being concern.

“The mental health issues emerging from this period of prolonged stress need to be addressed now,” said Dr. Richard Chaifetz, Founder, Chairman and CEO of ComPsych. “Pandemic stress is contributing to widespread mental exhaustion, negative health impacts and unhealthy behavior changes. We’re seeing employers continue to expand their efforts with enhanced counseling, manager and employee trainings and a broad-based approach to better support employee needs.”

National Stress Awareness Day, the first Wednesday each November, aims to shine a light on the role stress plays in people’s mental health and the importance of learning how to manage it and cope with it.

Stress, Mental Health and Work

Workplace stress is a silent, and often neglected factor which can impair health and productivity and lead to absenteeism. According to a new ComPsych Tell it Now℠ customer employee poll 60 percent of employees report they feel stressed, anxious and depressed.

The employee impact is significant with direct consequences to business. In fact, the American Psychological Association’s 2021 Work and Wellbeing Survey showed 44 percent of American workers plan to change jobs in the coming year for a multitude of reasons—particularly, stress.

With employers looking to better understand the mindset of their employees and intervene before stress may lead to resignation or poor performance, ComPsych recently held a webinar for its customers entitled -“Managing Staff Through Stressful Times.” Attended by more than 900 HR and benefits leaders, the webinar offered real-world examples and scenarios to help managers identify and address the multitude of issues their employees face each day. For more information visit www.compsych.com.

About ComPsych

ComPsych® Corporation is the world’s largest provider of employee assistance programs (EAP) and is the pioneer and worldwide leader of fully integrated EAP, behavioral health, wellness, work-life, HR, FMLA and absence management services under its GuidanceResources® brand. ComPsych provides services to more than 56,000 organizations covering more than 127 million individuals throughout the U.S. and 190 countries. By creating “Build-to-Suit” programs, ComPsych helps employers attract and retain employees, increase employee productivity and improve overall health and well-being. For more information, visit www.compsych.com and follow us @ComPsych on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Contacts

Jamie Stein

ComPsych Corporation

312-451-7160

[email protected]

More than one in 10 Americans resigned during the pandemic due to increased stress at work OutBuro lgbt professional entreprenuer networking online community gay lesbian transgender queer

More than one in 10 Americans resigned during the pandemic due to increased stress at work

LifeWorks Mental Health Index™ indicates a decline in mental health after several months of improvement

CHICAGO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–LifeWorks, a leading provider of digital total wellbeing solutions, today released its monthly Mental Health Index™, revealing a negative mental-health score among Americans for the 18th consecutive month.

Key findings:

  • Overall mental-health score of -3.8 compared to the pre-pandemic benchmark, marking the first decline after four consecutive months of improvement.
  • In the latest survey, nearly one-third of Americans (30 percent) reported that they are either considering or are unsure about leaving their current job. These groups also reported a mental-health score more than 11-points worse than those who are not considering leaving their jobs.
  • The 17 percent of respondents who indicated that they are considering resigning from their job are reporting the lowest mental-health score (-16.1).
  • Sixteen percent of respondents have resigned due to changes in their physical health and this group has among the least favorable mental-health scores (-24.7).

Older employees more likely to consider resigning due to feeling underappreciated:

  • Older employees are feeling underappreciated in the workplace at a disproportionate rate, with eight percent of respondents between the ages of 40-69 citing lack of appreciation as the reason for considering resignation, compared to three percent of those aged 20-39.
  • Among all respondents, those under 40 years old are more than twice as likely to consider resigning from their job than respondents over 50 years old.
  • Parents are more than four times more likely than non-parents to report resigning during the pandemic.

Comments from president and chief executive officer, Stephen Liptrap

Employees have faced incredible challenges over the last year and a half, both inside and outside of the workplace. As many continue to experience the increased mental stress related to work, resignations are an inevitable consequence that is becoming a harsh reality for many organizations. Employers need to recognize an increasing condition of employment for Americans is to provide ongoing resources facilitating a culture that supports individual mental health needs. Employees are the backbone of any organization and prioritizing employee wellbeing is critical in order to retain talent.”

Nearly half of Americans have not been asked by their employer about working preferences, contributing to poorer mental health:

  • Nearly half (46 percent) of respondents report that their employer has not asked them about their working preferences for the post-pandemic workplace.
  • Over one-third (35 percent) of respondents report that their employer has asked them about their working preferences.
  • Managers are twice as likely as non-managers to report that their employer has asked about working preferences.

Comments from global leader and senior vice president, research and total wellbeing, Paula Allen

Our research indicates a clear connection between feeling valued at work and favorable mental health across the United States. Part of feeling valued is being heard and showing appreciation. We were surprised to see that mid and later career individuals were the most likely to consider resigning as a result of feeling underappreciated. There is a lot of focus on younger employees now, which is important, but that should not mean older employees are taken for granted.”

The full American LifeWorks Mental Health Index™ report can be found here. This month, the report includes additional insights on changes in mental strain and stress, preferences for the post-pandemic workplace environment, impact of salary on job satisfaction and more.

About the Mental Health Index

The monthly survey by LifeWorks was conducted through an online survey from September 2 to September 10, 2021, with 5,000 respondents in the United States. All respondents reside in the United States and were employed within the last six months. The data has been statistically weighted to ensure the regional and gender composition of the sample reflect this population. The Mental Health Index™ is published monthly, beginning April 2020, and compares against benchmark data collected in 2017, 2018, 2019.

About LifeWorks

LifeWorks is a world leader in providing digital and in-person solutions that support the total wellbeing of individuals. We deliver a personalized continuum of care that helps our clients improve the lives of their people and by doing so, improve their business.

ID-CORP, ID-MH, ID-US

Contacts

Heather MacDonald

LifeWorks

[email protected]
1-855-622-3327

Angela Pinzon

Kaiser & Partners

[email protected]
1-647-295-0517

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Inclusion 2021 – Chats with Cornell Verdeja-Woodson, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at Headspace

Ahead of his speaking participation at the online DEI festival, INCLUSION 2021, we caught up with Cornell Verdeja-Woodson, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at Headspace, and Founder & CEO of Brave Trainings on his thoughts on Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Belonging in the workplace.

Don’t miss your chance to catch Cornell speaking on an exclusive panel discussion at INCLUSION 2021, the leading virtual global business festival dedicated to equity, diversity & inclusion in the workplace.

Discussing Working towards a racially just workforce: One year on from global Black liberation uprisings 2020, Cornell will be joined by Leslie Gray, Head of Diversity & Inclusion and Chief of Staff, Office of the CEO at Mozilla and Asif Sadiq MBE, Senior Vice President, Head of Equity and Inclusion at WarnerMedia International. Together they will tackle:

  • How have the commitments made by companies to address racial inequalities across the world since June 2020 translated into action? Has adequate progress been made in the short term? 
  • What should companies be aiming for in regards to quotas, and what are the pitfalls when quotas are the only driver for race diversity
  • How can companies create a safe work environment for Black and people of colour – what actions can be implemented?
  • There is also an emotional tax associated with being Black in the workplace – what are companies doing to ensure the wellbeing of their BIPOC employees?
  • Who is getting it right and from where can we draw inspiration?

Want to be part of this year’s conversation? Then what are you waiting for? Sign up now and claim your free pass to attend the fastest-growing virtual event in the industry – INCLUSION 2021.

Experience a packed agenda featuring the biggest names in DE&I, interactive workshops and roundtables, plenty of social activities, and regular networking opportunities.

By attending, you will be able to:

  • Learn from in-depth D&I keynotes, case studies and panel discussions
  • Join interactive workshops and roundtables
  • Connect with essential D&I contacts at our online diversity exhibition
  • Grow your network during our INCLUSION social hour meetups
  • Discover how to support minorities, heal divides and increase staff unity

Hear from our incredible high profile line-up of 75+ expert speakers leading the charge for diversity, equity, and inclusion change in the workplace, including:

Visual Portfolio, Posts & Image Gallery for WordPress
Rashmi Verma, Global Head of Diversity & Inclusion at HUGO BOSS
Joseph Nwosu, Co Lead of the Black at Experian Network (ERG) at Experian
Cecilia Weckstrom, Senior Global Director, Head of Diversity, Inclusion & People Innovation at LEGO Group
Michael Vermeersch, Digital Inclusion Lead & Chair, UK Disability ERG at Microsoft
Michael Anaman, Head of Service Delivery and Head of Inclusion at NOW TV
Putri Realita, Global Diversity and Inclusion Lead at Danone
Leslie Gray MBA, Head of Diversity & Inclusion and Chief of Staff, Office of the CEO at Mozilla
Abigail Wilmore , Chief People Officer at Stella McCartney

Become a show sponsor…

Join RW3, WorkJam, Personio and BiasProof in the movement for change. Becoming an official partner or exhibitor at INCLUSION 2021 will help raise your visibility, connect with your target audience, develop your talent pipeline and improve your profitability. Position your brand as a real leader in the global movement for D&I change in the workplace. Click here for more information.

We can’t wait to see you in October. Tickets are limited, so make sure to grab yours now before they run out.

Thank you to all our sponsors:

Platinum Sponsor

Culture Wizard by RW3 - Global Inclusion Experts

Gold Sponsor

WorkJam

Silver Sponsors

Personio - The HR Operating System
BIASPROOF

Partners

Inclusion 2021 Partners - OutBuro LGBTQ Professionals lesbian gay bisexual transgender nonbinary queer onlin networking community job listings

Our Partner Charity

autistica

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Inclusion 2021 Summit – Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in the Workplace

Don’t miss your chance to catch an exclusive panel discussion at INCLUSION 2021, the leading virtual global business festival dedicated to equity, diversity & inclusion in the workplace. OutBüro is a partner and will be hosting LGBTQ+ Inclusion break-out sessions and available in the main lobby for additional information and engagement.

Discussing Wellbeing in a Post-Pandemic World – Defining Expectations and Reprogramming Routines, Anna Mouchref, Leading Culture & Diversity, Siemens Digital Industries; Praveen Gopalan, Environmental Sustainability & Employee Engagement Programme Manager for BBC Studios and Dr. Shaun Davis, Global Director of Safety, Health, Wellbeing & Sustainability, Royal Mail will cover:

  • What impact has the pandemic had on employee wellbeing over the last year – can this be measured, and if so, how?
  • As many organisations move to a hybrid workforce model, what should be considered and implemented in terms of employee wellbeing?
  • What steps can and should leaders take to role-model behaviours, to promote a culture of wellbeing among their workforce?
  • Why is a more holistic relationship between work and life more beneficial and what has been the impact of the pandemic
  • How can you stay agile and review the approach to wellbeing in response to changing external factors?

Want to be part of this year’s conversation? Then what are you waiting for? Sign up now and claim your free pass to attend the fastest-growing virtual event in the industry – INCLUSION 2021.

Experience a packed agenda featuring the biggest names in DE&I, interactive workshops and roundtables, plenty of social activities and regular networking opportunities.

By attending, you will be able to:

  • Learn from in-depth D&I keynotes, case studies and panel discussions
  • Join interactive workshops and roundtables
  • Connect with essential D&I contacts at our online diversity exhibition
  • Grow your network during our INCLUSION social hour meetups
  • Discover how to support minorities, heal divides and increase staff unity

Hear from our incredible high profile line-up of 75+ expert speakers leading the charge for diversity, equity, and inclusion change in the workplace, including:

Visual Portfolio, Posts & Image Gallery for WordPress
Rashmi Verma, Global Head of Diversity & Inclusion at HUGO BOSS
Joseph Nwosu, Co Lead of the Black at Experian Network (ERG) at Experian
Cecilia Weckstrom, Senior Global Director, Head of Diversity, Inclusion & People Innovation at LEGO Group
Michael Vermeersch, Digital Inclusion Lead & Chair, UK Disability ERG at Microsoft
Michael Anaman, Head of Service Delivery and Head of Inclusion at NOW TV
Putri Realita, Global Diversity and Inclusion Lead at Danone
Leslie Gray MBA, Head of Diversity & Inclusion and Chief of Staff, Office of the CEO at Mozilla
Abigail Wilmore , Chief People Officer at Stella McCartney

Become a show sponsor…

Join RW3, WorkJam, Personio and BiasProof in the movement for change. Becoming an official partner or exhibitor at INCLUSION 2021 will help raise your visibility, connect with your target audience, develop your talent pipeline and improve your profitability. Position your brand as a real leader in the global movement for D&I change in the workplace. Click here for more information.

We can’t wait to see you in October. Tickets are limited, so make sure to grab yours now before they run out.

Thank you to all our sponsors:

Platinum Sponsor

Culture Wizard by RW3 - Global Inclusion Experts

Gold Sponsor

WorkJam

Silver Sponsors

Personio - The HR Operating System
BIASPROOF

Partners

Inclusion 2021 Partners - OutBuro LGBTQ Professionals lesbian gay bisexual transgender nonbinary queer onlin networking community job listings

Our Partner Charity

autistica

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New Study From Mind Share Partners In Partnership With Qualtrics And ServiceNow: Employee Mental Health Challenges Now Impact The Majority Of U.S. Workers—Persisting Longer And Pushing More Employees To Leave Their Jobs

Follow-On Study Offers A Rare Pre- And Post-Pandemic Comparison On The State Of Workplace Mental Health And Spotlights The Heightened Stakes For Employers

SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Mind Share Partners, a national nonprofit that is changing the culture of workplace mental health, launched “Mind Share Partners’ 2021 Mental Health at Work Report in partnership with Qualtrics and ServiceNow”—a study that explores mental health, stigma, and work culture in U.S. workplaces. This year’s study is sponsored by ServiceNow and Morrison & Foerster and is a follow-on to the 2019 Mental Health at Work Report.

Read more about the findings in our Harvard Business Review article.

The study reveals that mental health challenges are impacting a majority of U.S. workers at all levels of seniority for significant periods of time. 76% of full-time U.S. workers reported experiencing at least one symptom of a mental health condition in the past year (a 29% increase from 2019), with 80% of study respondents reporting their symptoms cumulatively lasting a month or more, and 36% reporting symptoms lasting five months to an entire year. Executive and C-level employees were more likely to report experiencing at least one mental health symptom, compared to managers and individual contributors.

With a growing dialogue around “The Great Resignation,” there are clear correlations to employers losing talent due to unsupported mental health challenges. The study found that 50% of respondents had left a previous role at a company due, at least in part, to mental health reasons, compared to 34% in 2019. This number grows to 81% for Gen Z and 68% for Millennial respondents.

“Prior to the pandemic, U.S. employers had just begun to acknowledge the prevalence and impact of mental health challenges at work, the need to address stigma, as well as the emerging link to diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI),” said Kelly Greenwood, Founder & CEO of Mind Share Partners.

“The stakes have been raised. Companies must move from viewing mental health as an individual’s responsibility to a collective priority. The future of workplace mental health demands culture change. Everyone within an organization plays a unique role in creating a mentally healthy workplace, with leadership paving the way. We can’t afford to go back to ‘business as usual’. Now is the time to be intentional and imagine what work could be—with more vulnerability, compassion, and sustainable ways of working,” Greenwood said.

Other Key Findings Include:

Workplace factors have a clear impact on mental health.

  • 84% of study respondents reported at least one workplace factor that negatively impacted their mental health in the past year—the most common being emotionally draining work (37%).
  • Employers’ return to office plans are negatively impacting mental health. The most common ways were the policies themselves around in-person vs. remote work after the pandemic (41%) and lack of work-life balance or flexibility based on the policy (37%).
  • The study found that employees who have felt supported by their employers with the pandemic, racial injustices, return to office planning, and/or mental health overall have better mental health and engagement outcomes.

Employees are talking about mental health more, but their comfort levels and experience of these conversations are still mixed.

  • Two-thirds (65%) of study respondents reported having talked about their mental health to someone at work in the past year—a 63% increase from 40% in 2019.
  • 41% of study respondents felt comfortable talking to their colleagues about their own mental health—a 46% increase from 2019 (28%); 40% felt comfortable talking to managers—a 38% increase from 2019 (29%); and 37% to HR—a 48% increase from 2019 (25%).
  • Only 49% of respondents described their experience of talking about mental health at work as positive or that they received a positive or supportive response—comparable to rates in 2019 (48%).

Diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) programs continue to play a strong role in workplace mental health, but significant investment and commitment are needed to alleviate disproportionate challenges exacerbated by the events of 2020, including, but not limited to, systemic racism and trauma experienced by Black employees and school closures due to Covid-19 impacting parents and caregivers.

  • Younger workers (i.e., Gen Z and Millennial respondents), caregivers, and respondents from historically underrepresented communities (including LGBTQ+, transgender, Black, and Latinx respondents) tended to be more likely to experience mental health symptoms, more likely to say that work or the workplace environment negatively impacted their mental health, and more likely to have left a previous role due, at least in part, to mental health reasons.
  • Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders were among those who felt the least supported amidst the pandemic and racial hate crimes / injustices, alongside Native American respondents for the pandemic, and mixed-race respondents for the racial hate crimes / injustices.

Employers are investing more into mental health and employees are increasingly drawn to day-to-day support versus temporary, Band-Aid solutions.

  • Resources provided by employers to employees grew since the pandemic, including extra paid time off (55% growth), mental health days (41% growth), and mental health training (33% growth).
  • There was significant growth in the use of accommodations by employees.
  • The “resource” most desired by respondents (31%) was a more open culture around mental health.

Employers are deepening their investment in supporting mental health at work through company culture, but still haven’t achieved true culture change.

  • 32% more respondents believe that mental health was actually prioritized at their company (54% in 2021; 41% in 2019).
  • 27% more respondents believe their company leaders were advocates for mental health at work (47% in 2021; 37% in 2019). 21% more respondents believe that their manager was equipped to support them if they had a mental health condition or symptom (47% in 2021; 39% in 2019).

The study indicates an overarching theme that the future of workplace mental health is through employer investment in culture change—including sustainable ways of working. Employers must shift their view of mental health from being an “individual’s issue” to a company priority. Mind Share Partners’ Ecosystem of a Mentally Healthy Workplace Framework highlights how everyone within an organization has a role in influencing and changing the broader culture around work and mental health.

“The past year has highlighted the impact mental health has had on so many of our colleagues and employees,” said Qualtrics Chief People Officer Julia Anas. “Whether employees need someone to talk to, flexibility to take care of themselves, their families and friends, or recognition for their success, it’s imperative that company leaders listen, understand, and lead with empathy in helping employees find solutions. Each individual is unique, so there is not a one-size-fits-all approach, but it starts with listening, followed by taking action.”

“We are not the same workers we once were,” said Nick Tzitzon, Chief Strategy and Corporate Affairs Officer at ServiceNow. “As leaders, we need the grace and imagination to open the conversation about mental health, starting and supporting frank, sometimes difficult, conversations in the workplace.”

This study is based on collected responses from 1,500 individuals via an online survey from May 21, 2021 to June 18, 2021 through Qualtrics. To download the full findings please visit: www.mindsharepartners.org/mentalhealthatworkreport-2021-download

About Mind Share Partners

Mind Share Partners is a national nonprofit that is changing the culture of workplace mental health so that both employees and organizations can thrive. It does this by building public awareness, hosting communities to support employee resource groups (or affinity groups) and professionals, and providing workplace mental health training and strategic advising to leading companies. Learn more at www.mindsharepartners.org.

About Qualtrics

Qualtrics, the world’s #1 Experience Management (XM) provider and creator of the XM category, is changing the way organizations manage and improve the four core experiences of business—customer, employee, product, and brand. Over 13,500 organizations around the world are using Qualtrics to listen, understand, and take action on experience data (X-data™)—the beliefs, emotions, and intentions that tell you why things are happening, and what to do about it. To learn more, please visit qualtrics.com.

About ServiceNow

ServiceNow (NYSE: NOW) is making the world of work, work better for people. Our cloud‑based platform and solutions deliver digital workflows that create great experiences and unlock productivity for employees and the enterprise. For more information, visit: servicenow.com.

Contacts

Nina Tomaro

Marketing and Communications Lead

Mind Share Partners

[email protected]

Erica Evans

Qualtrics Public Relations

[email protected]

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Women Are Rising to Be the Leaders Companies Need, But Work Is Going Unrecognized and Unrewarded

SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 27, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Today, LeanIn.Org and McKinsey & Company released the seventh annual Women in the Workplace report, the largest study on the state of women in corporate America. The findings point to three key trends: A year into the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s clear that women are burned out and at risk of leaving the workforce. Women are stepping up as stronger leaders, but their work often goes unrecognized. At the same time, corporate America is still failing women of color despite two years of increased focus on racial equity.

The report is based on data and insights from 423 companies representing more than 12 million people, along with survey responses from over 65,000 individual employees. It shows that despite important gains since 2016, women remain significantly underrepresented at all levels of management in corporate America.

At the same time, women in leadership are rising to the moment as stronger people leaders and more active champions of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI)—and are taking on the extra work that comes with it. Compared to men at the same level, women in senior leadership are 60 percent more likely to provide emotional support to employees and 24 percent more likely to ensure their teams’ workloads are manageable. Senior women leaders are also twice as likely to spend a substantial amount of time doing DEI work outside of their formal job responsibilities—from recruiting candidates belonging to underrepresented communities to leading employee resource groups. And at every level, women are more likely than men to show up as allies to women of color.

Companies have benefited significantly from women’s leadership during this year of unprecedented workplace changes. However, this critical work is largely going unrecognized and unrewarded. Despite companies signaling a high commitment to DEI and employee wellbeing, only 25 percent say that their formal performance review process recognizes this type of work to a substantial degree. This has serious implications. Companies risk losing the very leaders they need right now.

“Women are contributing more yet are often less recognized. Burnout is at an all-time high. While women have been resilient, it is a moment of reflection,” said Lareina Yee, a senior partner at McKinsey & Company. “Companies cannot afford to miss the signals of talent attrition. It’s time to invest in the leaders who have kept companies afloat throughout the challenges of the past two years.”

While all employees are more burned out than last year, women have been hit particularly hard. Forty-two percent of women report being burned out, as compared to 35 percent of men. And 24/7 cultures are driving this exhaustion. More than one in three employees feel as if they are expected to be “on” at all times, and those who feel this way are more than twice as likely to be burned out.

“This year’s report should serve as a wake-up call. Despite bold commitments to racial equity, the experiences of women of color aren’t getting better,” said Rachel Thomas, co-founder and CEO of LeanIn.Org. “This points to the critical need to engage employees as change agents and allies, so we can truly transform the culture of work.”

Despite a greater awareness of DEI issues and increased focus and investment on racial equity in corporate America, women of color continue to experience similar types of microaggressions at similar frequencies as they did two years ago. These experiences can take a heavy toll: compared to women of color who don’t experience microaggressions, women of color who do are more than twice as likely to feel negatively about their job, twice as likely to be burned out, and three times as likely to say they’ve struggled to concentrate at work due to stress. And while more white employees see themselves as allies to women of color this year, they are no more likely to take action. Seventy-seven percent of white employees say they’re allies to women of color, but only 39 percent confront discrimination when they see it and only 21 percent regularly advocate for new opportunities for women of color. This points to the critical need for businesses to equip employees at all levels to challenge bias and show up as substantive allies.

In addition to steps companies can take to recognize women’s leadership, create a more inclusive culture, and reduce burnout, the 2021 Women in the Workplace report includes best practices for eliminating bias in hiring and promotions, a detailed look at what HR leaders and employees see as the benefits and risks of remote work, and data-driven vignettes on the distinct experiences of Asian women, Black women, Latinas, lesbian and bisexual women, and women with disabilities.

The complete Women in the Workplace report is available at womenintheworkplace.com.

ABOUT THE STUDY
The Women in the Workplace study is conducted in partnership with LeanIn.Org and McKinsey & Company. The first study was released in 2015, and each year examines current issues facing women in corporate America. This year’s report is the second study conducted during the eighteen-month-long pandemic and is based on data and insights from 423 companies representing more than 12 million people, along with survey responses from over 65,000 individual employees. The complete Women in the Workplace report is available at womenintheworkplace.com.

ABOUT LEANIN.ORG
An initiative of the Sheryl Sandberg & Dave Goldberg Family Foundation, LeanIn.Org helps women achieve their ambitions and works to create a more equal world. LeanIn.Org conducts original research on the state of women, supports a global community of small peer groups called Lean In Circles, and provides companies with programs to address the biases and barriers women face in the workplace. Lean In recently released Allyship at Work, a new training program designed to help employees take meaningful action as allies. For more information about LeanIn.Org and its programs, visit leanin.org. The Sheryl Sandberg & Dave Goldberg Family Foundation, which also runs OptionB.Org, is a private operating nonprofit organization under IRS section 501(c)(3).

ABOUT MCKINSEY & COMPANY
McKinsey & Company is a global management consulting firm committed to helping organizations create Change that Matters. In more than 130 cities and 65 countries, our teams help clients across the private, public and social sectors shape bold strategies and transform the way they work, embed technology where it unlocks value, and build capabilities to sustain the change. Not just any change, but Change that Matters – for their organizations, their people, and in turn society at large.

MEDIA CONTACT
We are actively monitoring [email protected] for press inquiries.

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SOURCE LeanIn.Org

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Fewer Americans report a sense of belonging at work when compared to pre-pandemic

LifeWorks Mental Health Index™ indicates that close to half of Americans are working while feeling unwell.

CHICAGO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–LifeWorks, a leading provider of digital total wellbeing solutions, today released its monthly Mental Health Index™, revealing a negative mental-health score among Americans for the 17th consecutive month.

Key findings:

  • Overall mental-health score of -3.0 compared to the pre-pandemic benchmark, reaching its highest point since the launch of the index in April 2020.
  • In the latest survey, 80 percent of respondents indicated that prior to the pandemic, they felt a sense of belonging and acceptance at work, but only 74 percent felt the same during the past month.
  • Meanwhile, 20 percent of respondents indicated that before the pandemic, they were unsure or did not feel a sense of belonging, compared to 26 percent feeling the same during the past month.
  • This trend is seen across all age groups, however, the proportion of employees who report feeling a sense of belonging and acceptance at work increases with older age groups.

Pandemic-driven work-from-home model contributes to worsening isolation among American employees:

  • The majority of employees (65 percent) who are working at a jobsite feel a greater sense of belonging and acceptance at work than those who work from home or in a hybrid workplace.
  • Isolation scores among those working exclusively from home are worse (-2.5) than those working in a hybrid model (-1.6) or from the jobsite (+0.4).
  • The 74 percent of respondents who felt a sense of belonging and acceptance at work during the past month, had the highest mental health score (+1.6) and the best isolation score (+0.5) compared to those who were unsure or did not feel the same way.

Comments from president and chief executive officer, Stephen Liptrap

As we look to the next phase of the workplace setting, isolation will remain an issue for many. While many employees will be granted with the ability to work from their preferred location, those working in virtual or hybrid environments may feel excluded as onsite corporate cultures evolve or fear missing out on opportunities. Employers must continue to foster inclusivity and show all employees that they are valued to create a strong culture and boost company morale.”

Two in five American employees report working while unwell on weekly basis, contributing to productivity loss:

  • Forty-two percent of respondents report doing their job when feeling unwell (physically or physiologically) at least one day per week. The mental-health scores among this group are significantly below those who report never working while feeling unwell.
  • The majority (58 percent) of respondents indicate that they never work while feeling unwell. This group has the most favorable mental health score, at more than seven points above the pre-2020 benchmark (+7.2).
  • Sixty percent of parents report working when feeling unwell at least one day per week, compared to 36 percent of non-parents.
  • Additionally, respondents who have a mental-health score of -40 or lower, are estimated to have a productivity loss of 22 percent, compared to those with a mental-health score of +10 or more with a productivity loss of 10 percent.

Comments from global leader and senior vice president, research and total wellbeing, Paula Allen

We have been going through a long period of strain and we are entering a new phase where some of the same uncertainties that created the initial strain are continuing and appearing in new ways. We know that a workplace culture of wellbeing and support for mental health can mitigate this. Our research is showing us that many, including parents, are struggling. Employer support is an important factor in their health and productivity, and will benefit them and the organization.”

The full American LifeWorks Mental Health Index™ report can be found here. This month, the report includes additional insights on the impact of remote work on mental strain, reasons for missed time from work due to illness, employees’ ideal work situations and more.

About the Mental Health Index

The monthly survey by LifeWorks was conducted through an online survey from July 30 to August 5, 2021, with 5,000 respondents in the United States. All respondents reside in the United States and were employed within the last six months. The data has been statistically weighted to ensure the regional and gender composition of the sample reflect this population. The Mental Health Index™ is published monthly, beginning April 2020, and compares against benchmark data collected in 2017, 2018, 2019.

About LifeWorks

LifeWorks is a world leader in providing digital and in-person solutions that support the total wellbeing of individuals. We deliver a personalized continuum of care that helps our clients improve the lives of their people and by doing so, improve their business.

ID-CORP, ID-MH, ID-US

Contacts

Heather MacDonald

LifeWorks

[email protected]
1-855-622-3327

Angela Pinzon

Kaiser & Partners

[email protected]
1-647-295-0517

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New Report: 67% of Employees Who Are Ready to Resign Think Employers Have Not Fulfilled Pandemic Promises Around Mental Health and Well-Being

‘Employee Stress Check 2021’ Report By Talkspace for Business and The Harris Poll Finds More than 40% of American Employees are Likely to Change Jobs to Resolve Stress; One in Four Believe Their Physical Health Has Suffered

Nearly 60% of Employees Believe that Supportive Management, Strong Social Office Culture, Mentorship, and More Mental Health Services Can Improve Retention

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Talkspace (NASDAQ: TALK), a leading online behavioral healthcare company, today released the ‘Employee Stress Check 2021 Report,’ a nationwide survey by Talkspace for Business with The Harris Poll that explores current employee attitudes toward mental well-being and work. The survey of more than 1,000 full-time employees in the United States found that while many have spoken about a great resignation, there is a period of “great reflection” that comes first, one in which chronic stress finally triggers an employee to seek immediate resolution. Talkspace for Business sought to understand the experiences that lead to resignation and what employees and therapists think companies should be doing to better tackle stress. The report details key stress drivers, the impacts of chronic stress, demographic comparisons, and helpful interventions cited by employees and therapists.

Employers across the U.S. are working hard to modernize the employee experience, yet the cultural shift is immense. As the workplace becomes more complex in regards to employee locations and needs, it is critical for companies to become proficient in recognizing new warning signs of stress and disengagement. In fact, the report found two out of every three employees considering leaving their jobs agree that their employer has not followed through on their early pandemic promises to focus on mental health. Other key takeaways from the survey include:

  • Two of every three employees (67%) who consider leaving their job agree that their employer has not followed through on early pandemic promises to focus on employee mental health. 68% of potential quitters said, “my employer [said] employees should focus on ‘self-care’ but doesn’t provide the resources to do so.”
  • 41% of all American employees are likely to consider a job change to resolve stress. Employees are bypassing helpful company policies, such as changing teams or short-term leaves, in favor of resignation.
  • Nearly 1 in 4 employees believe their physical health has suffered because of their job and at least 25% are underperforming regularly due to stress.
  • Employees under 35 and working mothers are having greater reactions to stress and are most likely to change jobs or careers, or quit in the next six months.
  • Although 52% of all employees report burnout, less than 20% of them are using the company benefits they believe are “most helpful” for mental health. This signals that employees may not be fully aware of what’s available, or may not feel comfortable taking advantage of certain benefits.
  • Nearly 60% of employees believe that supportive management can improve retention. “A manager that prioritizes mental health” is more highly ranked by employees than both a strong office culture and mentorship.
  • Employees want more than pay – six of the top ten reasons employees would stay at a job are connected with management, leadership, and culture across all demographics.

“The data is clear: employees are struggling to find healthy coping mechanisms to manage chronic stress,” said Dr. Varun Choudhary, MD, MA, DFAPA, Chief Medical Officer of Talkspace. “This new study suggests that employee well-being is shaped by many varying experiences — from managerial relationships to workplace policies, and available mental health and wellbeing resources. It’s critical that employers pay attention to pain points and implement effective solutions that counteract chronic stress, enhance workplace culture and improve retention.”

Talkspace commissioned the survey with The Harris Poll. Fieldwork was conducted from July 29 to August 2 among 1,015 full-time employed adults aged 18+ in the United States. For complete survey methodology, including weighting variables and subgroup sample sizes, please contact [email protected].

To learn more about the findings of the report, read the Employee Stress Check 2021 Report from Talkspace for Business.

About Talkspace

Talkspace (NASDAQ: TALK) is the leading virtual behavioral healthcare company committed to making care more effective, accessible, and convenient. Talkspace addresses the challenges of traditional mental healthcare by combining effective clinical solutions with technology designed for how we live today. The platform is powered by a diverse team of certified mental health specialists in every state providing therapy and psychiatric treatment for individuals, couples, and adolescents. Talkspace therapists meet clients where they are, on their schedules, on any device, via chat, voice, and video. All care is delivered through an easy-to-use and fully encrypted web and mobile platform, consistent with HIPAA and other state regulatory requirements. More than two million people have used Talkspace.

Talkspace for Business, the enterprise division of Talkspace, now covers more than 55 million lives. Existing relationships include leading employers, schools, and the nation’s largest health care plans, including an in-network provider agreement with Cigna.

For more information about Talkspace commercial relationships, visit https://business.talkspace.com/. To learn more about online therapy, please visit: https://www.talkspace.com/online-therapy. To learn more about Talkspace Psychiatry, please https://www.talkspace.com/psychiatry.

About The Harris Poll

The Harris Poll is one of the longest-running surveys in the U.S. tracking public opinion, motivations, and social sentiment since 1963 that is now part of Harris Insights & Analytics, a global consulting and market research firm that delivers social intelligence for transformational times. We work with clients in three primary areas; building twenty-first-century corporate reputation, crafting brand strategy and performance tracking, and earning organic media through public relations research. Our mission is to provide insights and advisory to help leaders make the best decisions possible. To learn more, please visit www.theharrispoll.com.

Contacts

John Kim | [email protected] | 310.997.5963

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Burnout Could Be New Contagion

ComPsych Poll Confirms Need for Employers to Act Now

CHICAGO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–#burnout–As the world struggles with what feels like an almost constant back-and-forth pendulum swing, business leaders are navigating an increasingly intricate workplace that includes a new contagion, burnout. According to a poll by ComPsych, the world’s largest provider of behavioral health and well-being services, 57 percent of employers say employee burnout is affecting turnover, retention and productivity at their company. Approximately 40 percent are concerned about declining employee engagement and morale.

“The pandemic has created some of the most trying situations leaders have ever faced and burnout is a serious issue in our new world of work,” said Dr. Richard A. Chaifetz, Founder, Chairman and CEO of ComPsych. “People’s mental and physical health are really strained and they are suffering. Employers must take the reins and actively try to alleviate issues before things get worse.”

Last year the World Health Organization classified burnout as a disease. A result of chronic and acute stress over long periods of time, work burnout is a condition characterized by general feelings of energy depletion, reduced work performance, and increased feelings of negativity about one’s job.

So what do employees think could help address burnout? 65 percent say encouraging time off and offering mental health days, according to a ComPsych Tell it Now℠ customer employee poll. 12 percent of respondents said more recognition and close to 10 percent acknowledged there is nothing their employer can do, and that they plan to leave their job anyway.

“The trouble with burnout is it isn’t just an individual experience. People struggling with these feelings can spread symptoms to others,” said Chaifetz. “The good news is that it can be addressed with the right strategy and resources.”

Addressing Burnout

  • Provide education and counseling workshops for employees.
  • Utilize employee assistance programs.
  • Offer flexible work options.
  • Normalize conversations around burnout and anxiety so employees feel comfortable sharing what they’re feeling.
  • Survey employees and show you are listening.
  • Ramp up employee recognition efforts.
  • Encourage employees to take vacation time.

Contacts

Jamie Stein

ComPsych Corporation

312-451-7160

[email protected]

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