Low-Productivity Workers Are Active for a Mere 90 Minutes Per Day, Prodoscore Data Reveals

More than 80% of an eight-hour day is unaccounted “gap time” for employees with low productivity

IRVINE, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Prodoscore, the leader in employee visibility and productivity intelligence software, today announced proprietary data that exposes the disparity of daily productivity levels between employees, with low-productivity individuals contributing approximately 90 minutes per day of productive work. The resulting report suggests that low-productivity employees comprise approximately 10% of any organization.

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These insights into employee productivity will be essential to any company as they consider their return to work plans and look at assessing their employees’ productivity.

Looking at data from January 2020 to April 2021, Prodoscore examined over 21.7 million data points collected from close to 3,000 U.S.-based employees and 140 organizations. Employees with low-productivity ratings represented 11.7% of the sample; employees with average productivity ratings, 72.7% of the sample; and employees with high productivity ratings, 16.1% of the sample.

“One of the essential benefits of our technology is that it creates visibility into how employees are engaged each day,” says David Powell, President of Prodoscore. “Having more than 10% of your employees register such low rates of productivity and high gap times can negatively impact the health and morale of your company. Even doubling the 90 minutes of activity of a low-productivity worker to 180 minutes (3 hours) is only 40% of an eight-hour day – still not the level of engagement you hope to see in your employees. Our data also unpacks a troubling trend: based on hours worked, your least productive employees are earning more per hour than your most productive employees.”

The Least Productive Employees Earn More per Hour

Compensation for an employee working 90 minutes per day and earning $60,000 annually, converts to an average hourly rate of $121.50, with an adjusted annual salary of $252,653. For an employee with average rates of productivity, compensation drops to $53 per hour and an adjusted salary of $111,000. For the highest performers, it drops to $44 per hour and an annual adjusted salary of $91,254.

Gap Times Range Between 45%-80%

With low-productivity workers contributing for only 90 minutes – or around 20% – of an eight-hour day, 80% of that day is considered “gap time” – time that is unaccounted for. In effect, a low-productivity worker is wasting $48,0000 of a $60,000 annual salary.

High- and average-productivity individuals are doing productive work for around four hours (240 minutes) with approximately 58.5% of their day registering as gap time. They tend to start their days earlier and end later than low-productivity individuals.

Gap time for the three productivity levels is highest at the beginning of the day. The low-productivity group takes approximately two hours to show a decrease in gap time, suggesting they are slower to start their day, compared to one hour for average- and high-productivity employees. Also, the low-productivity group shows more than 15 minutes of gap time per hour throughout the day, while average/high-productivity employees show less than 10 minutes.

High- and average-productivity employees can have bad days and weeks, but the data shows they are just that – bad days – and they “bounce back” relatively quickly (within 1-1.5 weeks). Low-productivity workers that make improvements take much longer (more than 3 weeks).

Productivity Across Five Activities

The study analyzed the three levels of productivity, looking at five business applications:

Email: Highly productive employees send almost 8 times more emails compared to employees with low productivity, while those with average productivity send just over 3 times more emails as employees with low productivity.

  • Highly productive employees send 30.5 emails per day
  • Average-productivity employees send 13.6 emails per day
  • Low-productivity employees send 3.9 emails per day

Calendar time: High- and average-productive employees schedule approximately 1.4 times more calendar time as employees with low productivity.

  • Highly productive employees have 82.4 minutes per day of calendar activity
  • Average-productivity employees have 72.8 minutes per day of calendar activity
  • Low-productivity employees have 54.6 minutes per day of calendar activity

Messaging and chat: Highly productive employees send 4 times as many chat messages as employees with low productivity, while those with average productivity send 2.5 times as many chat messages as employees with low productivity.

  • Highly productive employees send a rate of 13.6 chat messages per day
  • Average-productivity employees send a rate of 8.6 chat messages per day
  • Low-productivity employees send a rate of 3.4 chat messages per day

Voice and video: Highly productive employees have 2 times as much voice and video activity as employees with low productivity, while those with average productivity have 1.6 times as much voice and video activity as employees with low productivity.

  • Highly productive employees use voice and video 47.8 minutes per day
  • Average-productivity employees use voice and video 38.2 minutes per day
  • Low-productivity employees use voice and video 23.7 minutes per day

Customer relationship management (CRM): High- and average-productive employees have approximately 1.6 times more CRM activity as employees with low productivity.

  • Highly productive employees have 11.3 CRM activities per day
  • Average-productivity employees have 7.5 CRM activities per day
  • Low-productivity employees have 5.9 CRM activities per day

Documents: Highly productive employees work on more than twice as many documents as employees with low productivity, while those with average productivity work on 1.7 times as many documents as employees with low productivity.

  • Highly productive employees work on 3.6 documents per day
  • Average-productivity employees work on 2.8 documents per day
  • Low-productivity employees work on 1.6 documents per day

“Having this type of objective data to assess productivity can help us understand our employees’ behaviors, with the aim of ensuring everyone in the organization is able to perform at their highest level – not only for the benefit of the organization, but for their own benefit as well,” says Powell. “A lack of productivity by an employee is often tied to unhappiness with the position or to other issues at work or even at home. How great would it be if instead of the employee leaving or getting fired due to low performance, a higher level of support is offered? This data can open the door to more honest conversations between managers and employees on job performance and help prevent attrition – which, in today’s labor market, is of critical importance.”

For more details about the report’s findings, visit the Prodoscore Research Council website.

About Prodoscore

Prodoscore™ is a company dedicated to empowering teams to be more effective and productive, validated with improved performance and enhanced contributions. By providing visibility into employee activities through a single, easy-to-understand productivity score, a “prodoscore” is calculated to improve workforce productivity and streamline the employee experience. Prodoscore works seamlessly with cloud tools like Google Workspace, Office365, CRM systems, and VoIP calling platforms, allowing it to be quickly implemented and maintained. Learn more at prodoscore.com.

Contacts

Nadine M. Sarraf | CMO, Prodoscore | 213.262.2551 | nadine@prodoscore.com
Alessandra Nagy | VP, Bospar PR | 714.310.4439 | alessandra@bospar.com

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Scott Ballina: Diversity and Inclusion in Practice

In this episode of OutBüro Voices featuring LGBTQ professionals, entrepreneurs, and community leaders from around the world, host Dennis Velco chats with Scott Ballina, Senior Director, Diversity, Belonging & Giving for a global technology company.

Scott learned the value of diversity while serving in the US Navy as an officer leading a diverse group of sailors from all walks of life. It was also in this role where he experienced living double life hiding his sexual orientation through avoidance, double-speak, and living if needed to keep his identity a secret. While working as a technology consultant at Deloitte, Scott started working on diversity and inclusion in a part-time capacity. His passion for the work and its impact grew and he moved into the role full-time as soon as he was able.

The role of diversity and inclusion can be challenging since it is dealing with all employees who have their conscience and unconscious biases. Scott shares how in his current company they wanted to provide all employees the ability to self-identify their sexual orientation and gender identity. He explains that he had to partner closely with the legal team to assess each country’s laws where they operate. That process took just over a year to complete. Having this data will allow him an analyze promotions, attrition, how engaged the employees are and how their sexual orientation and gender identity may be impacting their experience and allow the company to have metrics around their efforts to improve the culture.

Towards improving the culture, Scott and the company worked on having out gay employees who are in leadership positions. When employees see persons in leadership who they identify with it provides strength to all employees. Studies have demonstrated that when there is more diversity in leadership, it fosters a culture of support for all.

Scott offers advice for organizations starting on their path to creating an inclusive work culture including reaching out to him. To connect with Scott find him on OutBüro here.
https://outburo.com/profile/sballina/

Join me and Bruce on OutBüro, the LGBTQ professional and entrepreneur online community network for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, allies and our employers who support LGBTQ welcoming workplace equality focused benefits, policies, and business practices. https://www.OutBuro.com

Would you like to be featured like this? Contact the host Dennis Velco. https://outburo.com/profile/dennisvelco/

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Queer Staff Network Berlin with Dr. Markus Loew

In this episode, host Dennis Velco chats with Dr. Markus Loew about the Queer Staff Network of Berlin. Dr. Loew describes the group as an LGBTQ professional network of networks. It is a coming together of all the LGBTQ employee resource groups (ERGs) from all corporate employers with offices operating in Berlin. They have 3-4 meetings a year where they discuss issues, strategies, opportunities, collaborate, and share to advance lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer equality, workplace belonging, career advancement, and how to assist their employers to be a better citizen in the LGBTQ community at large. Join the Queer Staff Network of Berlin group on OutBüro: https://www.outburo.com/community/groups/queer-staff-network-berlin/

Queer Staff Network Berlin 1
  • 01:00 Introduction of Queer Staff Network of Berlin
  • 05:00 Discusses the new direction to expand to LGBTQ entrepreneurs
  • 06:30 Advocating Corporate Supplier Diversity a mutual benefit
  • 13:00 Leveraging www.OutBuro.com for Employer ERGs through online groups
  • 14:20 Questions for companies – are you maximizing the opportunities?
  • 18:00 A company thought they were in the LGBTQ consumer market, yet was not positioned well
  • 19:00 Inclusion and diversity with authenticity can lead to opportunity
  • 24:15 Pinkwashing – Bad for corporate image and business – be authentic – example

Connect with Dr. Markus Loew on OutBüro: https://www.outburo.com/profile/marku…

Currently, Germany has one LGBTQ chamber of commerce located in Köln (Cologne). The Queer Staff Network of Berlin is bridging the lack of a formal LGBTQBerlin Chamber of Commerce to invite local and regional small and medium LGBTQ entrepreneurs to join the group. They are mentoring the business owners on how to do business with the large corporations, what products and services are needed and how the LGBTQ owned businesses can participate in the procurement process and hopefully win the contracts. On the inside, the corporate members of the Queer Staff Network of Berlin are raising awareness of the need and value of supplier diversity. They are internal champions for the small and medium LGBTQ owned businesses. It is a “Hey Dir of Procurement, we use/need X, and here’s an LGBTQ owned business that can supply that for us”. This level of collaboration, commitment, mentorship, and advocacy is a bright shining example of DOING IT RIGHT! APPLAUSE!

Join Markus on OutBüro, the LGBTQ professional and entrepreneur online community network for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, allies and our employers who support LGBTQ welcoming workplace equality focused benefits, policies, and business practices. https://www.OutBuro.com

Would you like to be featured like this? Contact the host Dennis Velco. https://www.outburo.com/profile/denni…