Employee Surveillance Measures Could Threaten Trust and Increase Staff Turnover VMware Research Finds OutBuro lgbtq professional entreprenuer networking online community gay lesbian transgender queer

Employee Surveillance Measures Could Threaten Trust and Increase Staff Turnover, VMware Research Finds

Rise in remote working requires new ways of monitoring performance and output but not simply through counting keystrokes and time at the desk

PALO ALTO, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–VMware, Inc. (NYSE: VMW), a leading innovator in enterprise software, today shared results of a global study that revealed the rise in employee performance and trust established in new hybrid working models could be under threat from an increase in the implementation of remote monitoring measures.

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The study, “The Virtual Floorplan: New Rules for a New Era of Work,” conducted by Vanson Bourne on behalf of VMware, found that 70 percent of companies surveyed have either already implemented or are planning to implement employee surveillance measures to monitor employee productivity since the shift to hybrid working. Among these organizations, the measures being taken include the monitoring of emails (44%), web browsing (41%) and collaboration tools (43%), as well as video surveillance (29%), attention tracking via webcams (28%) and keylogger software (26%). However, 39 percent of companies that have already implemented device monitoring, and 41 percent of companies who are currently in the process of doing so, are in fact seeing “drastically increased” or “increased” employee turnover.

The research findings suggest there is a delicate balance to be struck as businesses look for new ways to assess employee performance beyond presentism. From the employee perspective, three quarters (75%) agree that moving to a distributed working environment has meant that their performance – and not traditional metrics such as time spent in the office – is being valued more by their employers. And, 79 percent of employees agree that remote work technologies have enabled them to work more efficiently than before. 74% of organizations have had to develop new ways to measure employee productivity. Among these organizations, the new approach to monitoring productivity has been achieved through the use of performance-focused solutions including regular catch-ups with managers to discuss workloads (55%), assessing output and agreed deliverables (53%) and using new project management software (47%).

However, now that direct reports are not necessarily sitting a few cubicles away, employers are evolving new ways to monitor and quantify employee productivity. While approaching six in ten (59%) employees recognize their organization has had to develop new ways to monitor productivity as part of the move to hybrid working, transparency remains critical. A quarter of employees (24%) don’t know whether their organization has implemented device monitoring systems on their devices to monitor their productivity.

“Globally we are seeing organizations shift permanently to hybrid work models that don’t require knowledge workers to be office-based all the time. With this shift, employers should proceed with caution when replacing presentism with monitoring tools. Monitoring and performance are two very different things,” says Shankar Iyer, senior vice president and general manager, End-User Computing, VMware. “Digital workspace tools enable people to work from anywhere and our research shows employees are feeling more valued and trusted. A lack of transparency and measurement by ‘stealth and numbers,’ can quickly erode employee faith and lead to talent heading for the door, in a highly competitive and challenging skills market.”

Employee surveillance is one of many topics touched on in The Virtual Floorplan: New Rules for a New Era of Work. Other key findings include:

  • New “workplace tribes” have emerged via digital tools used by employees. The stabilization of hybrid work has resulted in a new kind of office floorplan — a “virtual floorplan,” which is based more on affinity, shared goals, and shared values than physical proximity. The virtual floorplan comes with new rules, as well as new success factors for employees, leaders, and teams. View the infographic.
  • We’ve entered a new era of transparency and trust. With less central control and in-person interaction, transparency and trust are emerging as vital qualities that leaders must embrace to advance and unify their organizations in a hybrid-by-default world. View the infographic.
  • Security is a team sport. The virtual floorplan introduces countless freedoms for employees — and just as many security risks for IT. With less direct control over apps, devices, and networks, IT is navigating a new paradigm where security is a team sport. View the infographic.

An executive summary of the study can be downloaded here.

Methodology

VMware commissioned a survey, undertaken by an independent research organization, Vanson Bourne, in July and August 2021. 7,600 respondents were surveyed globally, consisting of HR, IT and business decision makers as well as employees across IT, Manufacturing, engineering and production, Financial services, Business and professional services, Retail and wholesale, Energy, oil/gas and utilities, Distribution and transport, Public healthcare, Construction and property, Public Education, Telecommunications, Consumer services, Local government, Central government, Media leisure and entertainment, Private education, Private healthcare, Hospitality and others. All organizations surveyed have 500 or more employees globally. The countries surveyed include UK, Germany, France, Italy, Netherlands, Russia, Poland, Norway, Sweden, Spain, UAE, Saudi Arabia, US, Canada, Japan, Australia, India, China, Singapore and South Korea.

About VMware

VMware is a leading provider of multi-cloud services for all apps, enabling digital innovation with enterprise control. As a trusted foundation to accelerate innovation, VMware software gives businesses the flexibility and choice they need to build the future. Headquartered in Palo Alto, California, VMware is committed to building a better future through the company’s 2030 Agenda. For more information, please visit www.vmware.com/company.

Contacts

Angela Leaf, VMware Global Communications, +1 860 480 3367, aleaf@vmware.com

Survey Finds 63 Percent of Employees Lack Confidence in Their Companys Return-to-Work Strategy Up 16 Percent From Spring 2021 OutBuro lgbtq employees networking online community

Survey Finds 63% of Employees Lack Confidence in Their Company’s Return-to-Work Strategy, Up 16% From Spring 2021

Humanyze’s second 2021 Future of Work Report reveals work’s evolution during the pandemic and workforce sentiments about the post-pandemic future of the workplace

BOSTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Humanyze, a leader in workplace analytics, today released the second installment of the 2021 Future of Work Report, a holistic analysis of the evolution of work throughout the pandemic and employee sentiments about the post-pandemic future of the workplace. Nearly 2,300 survey responses were collected from individual employees and people managers, and compared to responses from the spring 2021 report, to identify key changes over the last 6 months. The findings from both surveys were then measured against data from the Humanyze Platform to compare how employees and managers feel, with how they actually work.

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“Looking at subjective workforce sentiments and how work objectively gets done within organizations gives us a holistic view of the pandemic’s impacts and what this could mean for the future of work post-COVID,” said Taemie Kim, Co-founder and Chief Scientist, Humanyze. “Measuring our own analytics against these survey responses revealed that, although employees seem to be effectively adapting to remote work as the pandemic continues, many challenges and concerns remain.” At a time when employee attrition and operational resilience are top concerns for employers, the report’s latest findings further emphasize the importance of a data-driven, people-centric approach to workplace decision-making.

Biggest Challenges & What’s At Risk

When asked about their greatest work challenge during the pandemic, the top response for employees was work-life balance, followed by the lack of informal social interactions with colleagues, managers, and leadership. Managers, on the other hand, listed employee attrition and disengagement as their main hurdle, followed by decreased productivity. “A big driver of employee engagement and productivity is the ability to seamlessly interact with coworkers, which was obviously hindered after the abrupt shift to remote work in 2020,” said Ben Waber, Co-founder and President of Humanyze. “If employees feel disconnected from the organization, it ultimately seeps into disengagement with the work itself.”

After the start of the pandemic, Humanyze observed a 21% decrease in collaboration with “weak ties,” peripheral colleagues that you interact with less frequently but are essential for engagement, knowledge-sharing, and innovation. While this remains the case today, not all employee collaboration has suffered. Compared to pre-pandemic, Humanyze data shows meaningful increases in cross-level, cross-team collaboration, and communication between employees and their immediate colleagues and managers. “Interestingly, our data shows employees are changing how they work, and doing so in ways that can actually help address many of the challenges mentioned in the surveys,” said Waber. “Remote work undeniably comes with its challenges, but it’s also showing us that employees can adapt over time.”

Shaping the Post-Pandemic Future of Work

Although employees and managers seem to be adapting to remote work and collaborating more effectively since the start of the pandemic, one of the more concerning recent takeaways is an increased lack of employee confidence in their company’s future of work. Of those surveyed, 63% lack full confidence in their company’s post-pandemic workplace strategy being the right decision for employees, compared to 46% in April 2021.

Survey findings demonstrate a need for better communication and transparency from executive leadership, with over 50% of employees reporting they do not feel fully informed about their company’s post-COVID plans or how decisions get made. Around 20% of managers cited having absolutely no involvement or say, showing leaders have significant work ahead of them to achieve a more inclusive, transparent culture.

Although more than half of managers cited the use of employee surveys to understand employee preferences, 70% reported their company is not leveraging any other data or workplace technologies to inform strategies. This shows that, even in the digital age, objective data is still not a driving force for informing critical business and people decisions.

“Without effective communication or the necessary supporting data to inspire confidence in the company’s strategy, it makes perfect sense employees have these concerns and doubts,” added Waber. “As we see from our own data, employees have proven their resiliency in times of change, but leadership must establish trust in order to retain and support their people.”

What Managers and Employees Want

One key takeaway from the fall survey is that employees want continued flexibility, but still value the benefits of working with colleagues in-person. Although the majority of employees remain open to going back to the office in some capacity and listed in-person collaboration with colleagues and leaders as their top reason for doing so, 37% continue to agree they’d prefer to not go in at all.

When asked about their preferences in a hybrid work scenario, employees and managers both expressed a desire for thoughtfully-planned coordination. Forty percent of employees would want a fixed return-to-office schedule where they see the same people each time, while 45% of managers also ranked a fixed schedule as their top preference.

“Companies must realize, every team is different,” said Kim. “While a universally equal policy from the top down might sound best, and may be easiest, it impacts groups differently. Where it works for some, it fails for others. Therefore, manager input and employee surveys combined with leveraging available data and tools are critical to correctly identifying individual teams’ best working styles for post-pandemic planning.”

Behind the Survey & Data

In October 2021, Humanyze collected responses from nearly 1,000 managers and 1,265 employees through a third-party provider and compared these findings to results from the first 2021 Future of Work installment released in April. In spring 2021, only employees were surveyed, whereas the fall survey included both employees and people managers.

Survey findings were then measured against data from the Humanyze Platform, which leverages decades of MIT Research and billions of anonymous workplace interactions from large global companies to measure how, where, and with whom work gets done.

To learn about the report findings and hear from industry experts as they discuss the Future of Work, join Humanyze alongside thought leaders from Nike and Co3 for a webinar on Wednesday, Nov. 17th. To attend, register here.

To download the complete Fall 2021 Future of Work Report, visit humanyze.com/report-2021-fall-future-of-work/.

About Humanyze

Humanyze is a leading global provider of workplace analytics solutions, helping business leaders improve organizational effectiveness, a critical driver of financial performance. Enterprises use the Humanyze Platform’s data-driven benchmarks, indicators, and metrics within the categories of employee engagement, team productivity, and organizational adaptability, to inform and accelerate better management, HR, and workplace decisions. Founded in 2011 out of the MIT Media Lab, we offer an award-winning, patented AI platform with varying solutions that address today’s most pressing business challenges. These science-backed insights empower companies to confidently make decisions and continuously measure their impacts for ongoing improvements in the areas of Workplace Strategy and Organizational Health. Humanyze is committed to core values of data privacy for all employees and ensures 100% anonymity by design. We have a global presence spanning the US, Europe, and Asia and are on a mission to improve the Future of Work.

Contacts

Media Contact:
Giuliana Sannella

Matter Communications for Humanyze

humanyze@matternow.com

BAI Survey of Financial Services Employees Shows Over a Third Feel the Pandemic Has Had a Negative Impact on Their Mental Health OutBuro lgbtq employess professionals networking online community

BAI Survey of Financial Services Employees Shows Over a Third Feel the Pandemic Has Had a Negative Impact on Their Mental Health

CHICAGO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Recent research by BAI, a nonprofit independent organization that delivers the financial services industry’s most actionable insights, reveals that while employees’ work/life balance has improved during the pandemic, their mental and physical health and work load have been negatively affected. HR leaders are taking note and looking at ways to preserve the positive impacts of the pandemic work environment, while helping employees work through the personal challenges they are facing.

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BAI surveyed more than 250 financial services employees to better understand how the pandemic had affected their personal and professional lives. While the results on work/life balance were positive, the research showed a negative 37% net impact on mental health, a negative 13% net impact on physical health and a negative 22% net impact on workload.

“Increased remote work arrangements with more flexibility in where and when employees work has predictably had a positive impact on work/life balance,” said Karl Dahlgren, managing director at BAI. “However, for the long-term health and engagement of their employees, it is important for financial services leaders to better understand and act on other negative impacts from the pandemic.”

BAI hosted a Fireside Chat Webinar, “The Impact of the Pandemic on Financial Services Leaders,” to walk through the study and discuss how leaders can help employees with things like mental health and workload challenges. Participants included Catherine Garret, Senior Vice President, HR Operations, Technology and Compliance at Comerica Bank, and Dannielle Brown, Head of Employee Experience at M&T Bank. Moderated by Holly Hughes, Chief Marketing Officer at BAI, the discussion included real examples of how the participants are working to help their employees during these transitional times, including extending mental health services, monitoring employee workloads through analytics, and creating manager resources to help employees transition back to the office. The webinar was published November 9 and can be accessed on demand.

About BAI

As a nonprofit, independent organization, BAI has delivered the financial services industry’s most actionable insights for more than 95 years, helping leaders make smart business decisions every day. We provide in-depth, proprietary research to more than 40 of the top US banks, support more than 2,100 financial services organizations with compliance and professional development training, provide trusted, relevant thought leadership through BAI Banking Strategies reports, podcasts and webinars, and offer specialized events and programs. For more information, visit www.bai.org.

Contacts

Kendall Carwile

William Mills Agency

678-781-7224

kendall@williammills.com

BioSpace Releases Inaugural Best Places to Work in Biopharma Report OutBuro lgbtq professional entreprenuer networking online community gay lesbian transgender queer bisexual nonbinary

BioSpace Releases Inaugural Best Places to Work in Biopharma Report

DES MOINES, Iowa–(BUSINESS WIRE)–BioSpace, the leader in biopharma news and careers has today published its inaugural Best Places to Work report.

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The 2022 Best Places to Work in Biopharma report included responses from over 2,000 professionals from the biopharma industry to identify which companies are currently the most sought-after in the industry.

A total of 60 employers have been recognized as Best Places to Work, with 30 ranked in large (defined as more than 1,000 employees) and small (less than 1,000 employees) employer categories respectively.

“The biopharma industry has been experiencing a huge amount of both global appreciation and scrutiny. BioSpace felt it was important to recognize not only what these companies do for world health, but how they support the incredible industry professionals they employ,” said BioSpace CEO Josh Goodwin. “It’s important to highlight companies, like those on this list, that are doing things right in the eyes of their own community.”

Moderna, creator of one of three COVID-19 vaccines authorized in the US, was ranked as the number one most desirable large employer. Pfizer, Genentech, Amgen and Abbvie rounded out the top five large employers list.

CRISPR Therapeutics, leader in gene editing, gene sequencing and genetic testing, came out on top for small employers. 23andMe, 10x Genomics, Agios Pharmaceuticals and Intellia Therapeutics completed the top five small employers list.

Additionally, the report identifies the most valued employer attributes. Career growth and development was rated most highly, followed by leadership and pay.

To view the complete lists of 2022 Best Places to Work, click here.

About the Survey

Conducted in September 2021, research included responses from over 2,000 life sciences professionals. Respondents were asked to identify their top three most desirable biopharma companies, segmented by large (more than 1,000+ employees) and small (less than 1,000 employees) companies. Respondents were also asked to rate the importance of 10 attributes (i.e. pay, benefits, etc.) when thinking of top employers.

About BioSpace

BioSpace is the leading source for careers and news for life sciences professionals in the United States. Since 1985, BioSpace has provided essential insights, opportunities and tools to connect innovative life sciences organizations and talented professionals who advance health and quality of life across the world.

Contacts

Chantal Dresner

Marketing Director, BioSpace

chantal.dresner@biospace.com

Mercer Survey - The Great Resignation or The Great Reckoning OutBuro lgbt professional entreprenuer networking online community gay lesbian transgender queer bisexual nonbinary

Mercer Survey: The Great Resignation or The Great Reckoning?

  • Employees have left their employers at record rates this year. Looking ahead, new survey findings indicate that this will continue for certain segments of the workforce and become more stable for others.
  • Pandemic caused frontline, low-wage, minority and lower-level employees to consider leaving their employers at rates significantly higher than historical norms, according to new Mercer survey.

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The pandemic has highlighted a stark divide in how different demographics experience work, according to Mercer’s 2021 Inside Employees’ Minds study that surveyed over 2,000 US-based employees on what has been termed “The Great Resignation.” The findings showed that attraction and retention challenges are likely to continue in certain segments of the workforce, where there is a disconnect between what employees want and what employers are offering. While the “Great Resignation” implies a mass exodus of workers across demographics, a “Great Reckoning” signifies that only particular groups of workers – those who feel their employers are not meeting their needs – are considering leaving their job.

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Only 28% of respondents reported they were considering leaving their current employer, which is consistent with historical patterns – typically about 3 in 10 workers are considering leaving at any given point. However, certain groups are experiencing work much differently than others; frontline, low-wage, minority and lower-level employees are more likely to leave, at rates significantly higher than historical norms (see figure 1).

“In many organizations, frontline and lower-level employees have been underinvested in and not considered a priority. Wages have historically stagnated behind inflation as employers competed to hire these workers at the lowest possible cost. But the pandemic has shown that this same group of workers not only kept business afloat, but were critical in keeping our nation running,” said Melissa Swift, Mercer US Transformation Leader. “Employers now need to think differently about frontline and lower-level workers and deliver a compelling value proposition that addresses their needs.”

A component of this survey was to understand what employees’ top concerns are, both inside and outside of work. The findings show that, among all demographics, concerns over the Delta variant have pushed physical health to the top of the list. Second on the list is work-life balance and workload – employees say burnout is a key reason for them to consider leaving their employer, behind pay and benefits. Mental health is the third top concern amongst all demographics, but it is most pronounced amongst younger workers, women, low wage workers and Black and African American employees.

According to the survey, low wage workers – employees making less than $60k annually – are more worried about covering monthly expenses, physical and mental health, and financial wellness (retirement and debt). Higher wage workers are most worried about their health, work/life balance and personal fulfillment and purpose. In the survey, women were much more likely to be low wage workers than men (61% vs. 39%). These findings demonstrate the divide in the workforce and how employees on the lower-end of the wage spectrum have very different experiences at work and require different support to meet their individual needs.

The survey also found significant differences in the concerns of workers across ethnicity groups – for Black and African American workers in particular. Black workers rated personal safety above all other concerns, well ahead of other minority groups. Concerns over physical safety are in response to both systemic and emboldened racism stemming from events such as the capitol insurgency and racial violence, as well as psychological safety at work as Black workers are more likely to experience micro aggressions or retaliation at work.

Four key considerations to help employers navigate the hyper-competitive labor market

Prioritize hourly, front-line and low-wage workforces. Employers need to focus on how they can enhance the economic stability of their workforce and make frontline/hourly jobs more attractive – perks and other benefits won’t matter if these employees can’t address basic needs. Pay is one priority employers should consider, as well as other benefits that enhance the take home pay of this workforce, such as affordable healthcare and resources to enhance their financial wellness such as retirement savings programs and budgeting tools.

Burnout is a major issue and employees are struggling with mental health. Mercer’s 2021 Health on Demand research found while 59% of US employees say they feel some level of stress, one-quarter report being highly or extremely stressed. Offering a diverse set of wellbeing and mental health benefits will help manage a number of people risks, including employee exhaustion, rising health costs and employee turnover.

Make sure your company is a place where Black employees feel safe, accepted and able to be their authentic selves. Organizations must move beyond attracting diverse talent, to ensuring their systems and structures within the organization enable them to thrive. Examining your data to understand where the experience is falling short is a great place to start. Another powerful action employers can take is to train and equip managers to be strong allies to these employees. Managers who can confidently identify and stand up against workplace inequities and micro-aggressions are in the best position to increase levels of inclusion and safety.

Flexibility remains critical. With work/life balance ranking second as an employee top concern across all demographics, flexibility is a top priority and a necessity for most employees, and employers who fail to embrace this new reality are likely to face continued challenges when it comes to attracting and retaining talent.

“Given the challenges that employees have faced on the front lines of this pandemic over the summer, and through the social unrest that we saw last year – employees are saying, in many cases due to what they are paid in low wage jobs, it’s just not worth it. And they are looking for more from their employer,” added Swift.

About Mercer

Mercer believes in building brighter futures by redefining the world of work, reshaping retirement and investment outcomes, and unlocking real health and well-being. Mercer’s approximately 25,000 employees are based in 43 countries and the firm operates in 130 countries. Mercer is a business of Marsh McLennan (NYSE: MMC), the world’s leading professional services firm in the areas of risk, strategy and people, with 81,000 colleagues and annual revenue of over $19 billion. Through its market-leading businesses including Marsh, Guy Carpenter and Oliver Wyman, Marsh McLennan helps clients navigate an increasingly dynamic and complex environment. For more information, visit mercer.com. Follow Mercer on LinkedIn and Twitter.

Contacts

Micaela McPadden
201-694-9719

Micaela.mcpadden@mercer.com

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Software Advice Survey Highlights Employee Sentiment on Workplace Social Justice Initiatives

Over three-quarters of employers have not followed public stances with action steps, according to employee sentiment.

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AUSTIN, Texas–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Software Advice, a company that helps small businesses navigate the software buying journey, shared the findings from its report on social justice in the workplace today. It found that only 24% of workers said their employer had taken a public stance on at least one issue and followed up with action to support their stance.

The study, which was composed of nearly 500 U.S. employees, reveals the complex and nuanced landscape in which employers must navigate to engage ethically while employees themselves are divided on the best way their companies should engage in social justice issues. Less than a third of respondents (30%) believe both that taking a stance is good for business, and that their co-workers have similar opinions on social justice issues and the actions their employer should take.

Don’t be mistaken, respondents want their employer to act. The majority of respondents (57%) want their employers to take a public stance on social justice issues, even those they don’t agree with. But it can’t be lip service. One-fifth of respondents already believe their employers’ stance on social justice issues doesn’t align with their business practices.

“Implementing an ‘apolitical’ workplace is sure to backfire,” said Brian Westfall, Principal Analyst at GetApp. “More efforts should be made to provide safe spaces for internal discussions around these hot-button issues, such as implementing employee resource groups (ERGs). We also found that companies tend to get better results when they address issues closely related to their brand and identity. Lastly, be sure you practice what you preach—workers will call out hypocrisy on social justice stances instantly.”

To effectively address social justice issues in the workplace, employers must first build environments to discuss social issues. In the survey, 44% of respondents say that their job doesn’t have employee resource groups (ERGs) for workers to be able to discuss social justice issues, but they wish they did. To learn more on how to address the divide within your workplace, read the full report here.

About Software Advice

Software Advice™ helps businesses navigate the software buying journey. Industry-specific advisors guide people through the selection process and provide personalized software recommendations. Founded in 2005, Software Advice has helped more than 825,000 businesses find the right software for their specific needs through 1-on-1 advice, objective research, and actionable insights. Software Advice also features over 1 million verified user reviews to ensure people feel confident in their technology decisions.

Survey Methodology

The Software Advice Social Justice Response Survey was conducted in July 2021. We collected 487 responses from full- or part-time workers at U.S. businesses with at least five employees. The goal of this survey was to learn employee sentiment about how their employer should respond to social justice issues in the United States.

Contacts

Media:
Madison Martini

pr@softwareadvice.com

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New Report: 67% of Employees Who Are Ready to Resign Think Employers Have Not Fulfilled Pandemic Promises Around Mental Health and Well-Being

‘Employee Stress Check 2021’ Report By Talkspace for Business and The Harris Poll Finds More than 40% of American Employees are Likely to Change Jobs to Resolve Stress; One in Four Believe Their Physical Health Has Suffered

Nearly 60% of Employees Believe that Supportive Management, Strong Social Office Culture, Mentorship, and More Mental Health Services Can Improve Retention

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Talkspace (NASDAQ: TALK), a leading online behavioral healthcare company, today released the ‘Employee Stress Check 2021 Report,’ a nationwide survey by Talkspace for Business with The Harris Poll that explores current employee attitudes toward mental well-being and work. The survey of more than 1,000 full-time employees in the United States found that while many have spoken about a great resignation, there is a period of “great reflection” that comes first, one in which chronic stress finally triggers an employee to seek immediate resolution. Talkspace for Business sought to understand the experiences that lead to resignation and what employees and therapists think companies should be doing to better tackle stress. The report details key stress drivers, the impacts of chronic stress, demographic comparisons, and helpful interventions cited by employees and therapists.

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Employers across the U.S. are working hard to modernize the employee experience, yet the cultural shift is immense. As the workplace becomes more complex in regards to employee locations and needs, it is critical for companies to become proficient in recognizing new warning signs of stress and disengagement. In fact, the report found two out of every three employees considering leaving their jobs agree that their employer has not followed through on their early pandemic promises to focus on mental health. Other key takeaways from the survey include:

  • Two of every three employees (67%) who consider leaving their job agree that their employer has not followed through on early pandemic promises to focus on employee mental health. 68% of potential quitters said, “my employer [said] employees should focus on ‘self-care’ but doesn’t provide the resources to do so.”
  • 41% of all American employees are likely to consider a job change to resolve stress. Employees are bypassing helpful company policies, such as changing teams or short-term leaves, in favor of resignation.
  • Nearly 1 in 4 employees believe their physical health has suffered because of their job and at least 25% are underperforming regularly due to stress.
  • Employees under 35 and working mothers are having greater reactions to stress and are most likely to change jobs or careers, or quit in the next six months.
  • Although 52% of all employees report burnout, less than 20% of them are using the company benefits they believe are “most helpful” for mental health. This signals that employees may not be fully aware of what’s available, or may not feel comfortable taking advantage of certain benefits.
  • Nearly 60% of employees believe that supportive management can improve retention. “A manager that prioritizes mental health” is more highly ranked by employees than both a strong office culture and mentorship.
  • Employees want more than pay – six of the top ten reasons employees would stay at a job are connected with management, leadership, and culture across all demographics.

“The data is clear: employees are struggling to find healthy coping mechanisms to manage chronic stress,” said Dr. Varun Choudhary, MD, MA, DFAPA, Chief Medical Officer of Talkspace. “This new study suggests that employee well-being is shaped by many varying experiences — from managerial relationships to workplace policies, and available mental health and wellbeing resources. It’s critical that employers pay attention to pain points and implement effective solutions that counteract chronic stress, enhance workplace culture and improve retention.”

Talkspace commissioned the survey with The Harris Poll. Fieldwork was conducted from July 29 to August 2 among 1,015 full-time employed adults aged 18+ in the United States. For complete survey methodology, including weighting variables and subgroup sample sizes, please contact jkim@skdknick.com.

To learn more about the findings of the report, read the Employee Stress Check 2021 Report from Talkspace for Business.

About Talkspace

Talkspace (NASDAQ: TALK) is the leading virtual behavioral healthcare company committed to making care more effective, accessible, and convenient. Talkspace addresses the challenges of traditional mental healthcare by combining effective clinical solutions with technology designed for how we live today. The platform is powered by a diverse team of certified mental health specialists in every state providing therapy and psychiatric treatment for individuals, couples, and adolescents. Talkspace therapists meet clients where they are, on their schedules, on any device, via chat, voice, and video. All care is delivered through an easy-to-use and fully encrypted web and mobile platform, consistent with HIPAA and other state regulatory requirements. More than two million people have used Talkspace.

Talkspace for Business, the enterprise division of Talkspace, now covers more than 55 million lives. Existing relationships include leading employers, schools, and the nation’s largest health care plans, including an in-network provider agreement with Cigna.

For more information about Talkspace commercial relationships, visit https://business.talkspace.com/. To learn more about online therapy, please visit: https://www.talkspace.com/online-therapy. To learn more about Talkspace Psychiatry, please https://www.talkspace.com/psychiatry.

About The Harris Poll

The Harris Poll is one of the longest-running surveys in the U.S. tracking public opinion, motivations, and social sentiment since 1963 that is now part of Harris Insights & Analytics, a global consulting and market research firm that delivers social intelligence for transformational times. We work with clients in three primary areas; building twenty-first-century corporate reputation, crafting brand strategy and performance tracking, and earning organic media through public relations research. Our mission is to provide insights and advisory to help leaders make the best decisions possible. To learn more, please visit www.theharrispoll.com.

Contacts

John Kim | jkim@skdknick.com | 310.997.5963

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Employer Support Has a Direct Impact on the Health and Resilience of Employees, According to a Mercer Survey

  • The pandemic has had a material impact on the mental, financial and physical health of employees.

    • Over half of US employees report feeling some level of stress in the last year, nearly one fourth say they experienced mental health issues such as depression or anxiety, a fifth are financially worse off, and nearly a fifth feel less physically healthy or fit.
  • However, 53% of employees feel their employer has provided good support during the pandemic – and, compared to those who have received little support, they are less likely to have experienced the pandemic’s impact as mostly or entirely negative.
  • 45% of employees who feel they have received good support from their employers during the pandemic say they are less likely to leave their company as a result.

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–As the pandemic continues to unfold, the ability of employers to have a positive impact on employee health and resiliency cannot be understated and is one of the most important findings of the latest Mercer “Health on Demand” survey released today. Since the onset of COVID-19, when employers stepped up to provide essential support, it made a difference. Employees who say they received good support from their employers are much less likely to view their personal experience of the pandemic as mostly or entirely negative compared to those who received little or no support – 25% vs. 49%. And almost half (45%) of those receiving good support say they are less likely to leave their job as a result.

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Survey results confirm that the pandemic has had a material impact on the mental, physical and financial health of employees. Over half of US employees feel some level of stress in the last year; nearly a fourth of US employees say they experienced mental health issues such as depression or anxiety; a fifth are financially worse off; and nearly a fifth feel less physically healthy or fit. Low-wage earners were more likely to experience each of these negative impacts – and less likely to feel supported by their employers during the pandemic. These findings reinforce that employers have room for improvement when it comes to understanding the diverse needs of their employees and providing resources to support the well-being of the entire workforce.

“There is nothing more important to the health of a business than the health of its people and the communities in which that business operates. COVID-19 challenged our global healthcare system, but the ability of employers to have a positive impact on employee health and resiliency is one of the most important findings from our 2021 Health on Demand survey,” said Martine Ferland, President and CEO, Mercer. “The research is clear – employers that place health and humanity at the center of business transformation will build a more energized and adaptable workforce that is better able to persevere through periods of crisis.”

The 2021 report lays out several key findings and implications for supporting employee health and well-being:

Provide varied and valued benefits: Well-being is at the core of an employee’s relationship with their employer. The amount of support, type of support, and ability to personalize that support matters. The ability to customize a package of benefits to meet individual needs is highly or extremely valued by 55% of employees. Variety matters as well: the more benefits and resources that are offered, the more likely it is that each employee finds something of value. Of employees offered 10 or more health and well-being benefits or resources by their employer, 52% say that their benefits are a reason to stay with their company, compared to only 32% of those offered 1-5 benefits or resources. In addition, employees receiving 10 or more benefits are more confident that they can afford the healthcare they need – and more likely to agree that their employer cares about their health and well-being.

Enable digital access to healthcare: COVID-19 necessitated that healthcare be delivered in different and innovative ways. One-fifth of employees used telemedicine for the first time during the pandemic, and another 23% increased their usage. Of those trying telemedicine for the first time, the great majority – 72% – intend to keep using it. The survey also registered a sharp increase in employee interest in other digital health solutions, ranging from apps that help find healthcare providers to virtual reality tools for self-care. Compared to the 2019 Health on Demand survey, a greater percentage of employees in the 2021 survey found digital solutions to be highly or extremely valuable. The ability to access care virtually has gained momentum and become a valued option for employees. Survey results reinforce that employers need to plan for a future in which most healthcare journeys include virtual visits and digital healthcare supports.

Reduce stress and anxiety: Notably, US employees are more stressed than those in many other countries. While 59% of US employees say they feel some level of stress, one-quarter report being highly or extremely stressed. That’s the highest percentage of the 13 countries included in the survey. In the UK, for example, only 16% of employees feel highly or extremely stressed. With 48% of US employees rating employer support for mental health as highly or extremely valuable, employers that provide robust mental health and counselling benefits will foster greater loyalty and create a stronger bond with their employees. However, 40% of employees say it is difficult to find and access quality mental health care. It’s even harder for some employees: among low wage earners, that number rises to 47%. Employees identifying as LGBTQ+ place the highest value on employer support for mental health – 61% say it is highly or extremely valuable, but nearly as many (58%) say quality mental health care is difficult to find and access.

Clearly, employees have unmet needs when it comes to mental health care. Half (49%) of all US employees say that programs that reduce the cost of mental health treatment are highly or extremely valuable. Employers looking to provide affordable mental health care support should note that many employees would highly value virtual counselling via video chat with a therapist (42%), virtual counselling via text with a therapist (38%), and even virtual mental health advice via AI-powered text chats, with no human involved (31%).

Tackle healthcare inequities: Healthcare inequality persists, with higher-earners better able to access medical coverage, income protection and mental health counselling than low-earners. Participants with household income (HHI) at or below the US median are significantly less likely to feel confident they can afford the healthcare their family needs (60%) than those with HHI above the median (83%).

Unfortunately, the people who need support the most are the least likely to receive it. Those with HHI above the median reported having better access to benefits through their employers: the survey revealed a gap of 21 percentage points in access to employer-sponsored medical coverage between those with HHI at or below the median and those with HHI above the median and a 19-point gap in access to life insurance. Employers should consider a strategy that targets benefits to the groups that need them most. In a time of labor shortages, a strategy for achieving greater equity may also give employers a competitive advantage.

“Every good leader knows that when employees feel they are treated well they are more likely to stay, be engaged, and flourish,” said Kate Brown, Mercer’s Center for Health Innovation Leader, “With significant shifts in attitudes towards mental health, sustainability and digital healthcare over the last year, employers must evolve their health strategy to reflect a modern workforce that prioritizes flexibility, choice, a caring culture, and digital access to support their health and well-being.”

About the survey

The 2021 Mercer Health on Demand survey asked 14,000 employees across 13 countries across the globe about what they want when it comes to their health and well-being. Country and regional results were weighted to the true sample, with 2,000 in the US. The resulting report captures the voice of the employee to inform debate about employee health and wellbeing preferences, digital delivery of benefits, inclusive and environmentally-friendly solutions that meet ESG agendas and mental health solutions.

About Mercer

Mercer believes in building brighter futures by redefining the world of work, reshaping retirement and investment outcomes, and unlocking real health and well-being. Mercer’s approximately 25,000 employees are based in 43 countries and the firm operates in 130 countries. Mercer is a business of Marsh McLennan (NYSE: MMC), the world’s leading professional services firm in the areas of risk, strategy and people, with 78,000 colleagues and annual revenue of over $18 billion. Through its market-leading businesses including Marsh, Guy Carpenter and Oliver Wyman, Marsh McLennan helps clients navigate an increasingly dynamic and complex environment. For more information, visit mercer.com. Follow Mercer on LinkedIn and Twitter.

Contacts

Micaela McPadden
201-694-9719

Micaela.mcpadden@mercer.com

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GoodHire Survey Finds Americans Are Willing to Take Pay Cuts or Forgo Benefits to Work From Home

GoodHire, a leading background check platform, urges employers to get smart—remote work is the “new normal,” and employers need to understand how employee sentiment impacts hiring and building a trusted workforce.

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SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–#backgroundscreeningGoodHire, a leading provider of employment and background screening services, today released its inaugural report, “The State of Remote Work in 2021: A Survey of the American Workforce.” The report is based on an online survey of 3,500 Americans, ages 21-59 years, who shared their opinions about jobs, money and life in the era of remote work and COVID-19.

New or not, remote work is wildly popular in 2021. 68% of respondents said they preferred working from home to in-office work. So much so that 45% of Americans would either quit their job or immediately start a remote work job search if they were forced to return to their office full-time. Almost one-quarter of the respondents said, specifically, they would quit if a return-to-office mandate was instituted.

Some of the respondents even said they would be willing to take a pay cut of up to 50% to continue working from home. And, 70% of American workers would forfeit benefits to maintain remote working status, most commonly: health insurance, paid time off, retirement accounts, and more.

“Many Americans have acclimatized to working from home and do not want to see a return to ‘normal,’” GoodHire’s Chief Operating Officer Max Wesman said. “Permanent remote working is the ‘new normal’ for many professionals and a large proportion of companies have come to accept this fact as their new status quo,” he said. “Our survey clearly shows that those employers resistant to this change will risk losing employees and applicants to more adaptable companies.”

According to Wesman, the floodgates have opened and there’s no turning back.

“The office is no longer the primary location of choice for employee collaboration and productivity,” he continued. “In fact, our survey showed that people are bypassing job ads altogether that don’t mention a remote work option.”

The survey found that 85% of Americans prefer to apply for jobs that offer remote flexibility, while just 15% would apply for a position that requires total full-time office work. Further, 74% of respondents would need some sort of remote working arrangement to stay at their current job.

Wesman cautioned the prevalence of remote work brings along with it a new set of legal and practical challenges for employers and recommended companies update their hiring policies. “Since a new employee might be working remotely from a different state, a company wishing to conduct a background check will have to familiarize itself with applicable screening laws for the different states, counties, and cities they’re hiring in,” he said.

As employers navigate the new world of remote work, they can turn to a trusted background check partner that makes it easy to screen candidates remotely with a 100% paperless workflow. GoodHire’s background check platform features a mobile-optimized candidate experience with e-consent, as well as localized built-in compliance tools that help employers maintain compliance with various local screening laws and regulations.

For press kit/graphics of the survey, please visit: https://bit.ly/ghsurveygraphics2021

About GoodHire

Since 2013, GoodHire has been a trusted background check partner to more than 100,000 organizations. With its innovative, technology-first approach, coupled with an intense focus on customer delight, GoodHire has redefined the background check service industry. GoodHire uses automation and advanced data engineering to help customers accelerate hiring and make more confident hiring decisions. Thanks to its easy-to-use platform and responsive, FCRA-trained support team, our customer satisfaction and NPS scores match those of America’s most trusted brands. Headquartered in Silicon Valley, GoodHire is owned and operated by Inflection. To learn more, visit www.goodhire.com.

Contacts

Media Contact
Caroline James

caroline.james@aircoverpr.com