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Americans Are Willing to Work Longer Hours to Continue Working from Home

While the Right Perks Can Drive Some Employees Back to the Office, Nearly 25% Won’t Go Back Under Any Circumstance

IRVINE, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Now that Americans have had a taste of working from home, many are reluctant to go back to the office full-time, according to a new third-party survey from Prodoscore, the leader in employee visibility and productivity intelligence software. The company today announced the results of its research, which assesses employees’ attitudes and willingness to return to a pre-pandemic workstyle environment.

While many American business leaders are eager to hit the resume button and have their workplaces go “back to normal,” employees are more reluctant. A majority of Americans (75.6%) have returned or are expecting to return to the office full time, but nearly a third are unhappy about doing so. And, as evidenced by the Great Resignation, they are willing to put their job on the line to avoid the prospect: about a third of Americans (27.1%) reported they left their job or plan to rather than work full time in an office.

“The pandemic caused Americans to re-examine long held beliefs about the way we work,” said David Powell, President of Prodoscore. “We learned, for example, that we don’t have to be on site in a traditional office environment to keep the engine of commerce going. American employees have embraced the flexibility and work-life balance that working remotely delivers, and are looking to hold on to those benefits, even if they return to the office full time.”

Adapting to the Changing Workplace

The pre-pandemic, traditional workplace is no longer the dominant model in the American business environment. More Americans are working for a company that is implementing a hybrid work model (38.3%) than a traditional, full-time model (37.3%). Back in the office, employees are looking to bring elements of work from home with them. More than a third (39.2%) dress more casually in the office.

Employees Are Open to Change in Order to Work From Home

The survey shows that Americans are willing to make changes in exchange for working from home. Nearly 40% said they are comfortable with business leadership having visibility into their workday productivity; more than one-quarter (28.1%) will work longer workday hours; 16.% will take a pay cut; and 13.4% will forfeit company retirement contributions.

Working from Home Fosters a Work-Life Balance

Why the reluctance to go back to the office? Americans don’t want to give up the benefits of having work-life balance and the subsequent improvements in their physical and mental health – 43.6% said their physical health and 36.7% said their mental health have been impacted positively since working from home.

Perks Drive Willingness to Return to the Office

Under what circumstances would Americans return willingly to the office?

A majority of Americans would commit to working 100% in-office if it was a four-day work week, while more than a third would go back if they were given free lunches weekly or commute stipends. Nearly 30% said they would willingly return to the office if they had unlimited PTO. More Americans (19.6%) want a pet-friendly workplace than daycare available in the office or for free (16.3%).

But nearly a quarter of employees said there were no perks that would encourage them to work in the office full time – and there is absolutely nothing they miss about being in an office.

What Do Employees Miss About Office Life?

The lack of social interaction can’t be overlooked when discussing work from home scenarios. The one overriding element that employees miss the most when they’re not in the office full-time is their coworkers (48.2%). Spending time with co-workers is also their favorite part about being in an office. Nothing else comes close – not the snacks (5.4%) or free lunches (3.5%), not being away from the kids (6.2%), not having time to talk on the phone or listen to podcasts during the commute (2.8%).

“A distributed workforce, enabled by technology and productivity tools, is not the future – it is what is happening now,” said Powell. “As business leaders we need to get on board with this, to ensure that we are using the available tools to provide the flexibility our employees require and to facilitate – and then trust in – their ability to deliver at the highest performance levels, no matter where they are physically based. To attract and retain the best talent, this needs to be our charge.”

Methodology

In September, Prodoscore and Propeller Insights polled more than 1,000 U.S. adults working full time across demographics about their attitudes and willingness to return to the office full time, following the pandemic lockdown.

About Prodoscore

Prodoscore™ is a company dedicated to empowering teams to be more effective and productive, validated with improved performance and enhanced contributions. By providing visibility into employee activities through a single, easy-to-understand productivity score, a “prodoscore” is calculated to improve workforce productivity and streamline the employee experience. Prodoscore works seamlessly with cloud tools like Google Workspace, Office365, CRM systems, and VoIP calling platforms, allowing it to be quickly implemented and maintained. Learn more at prodoscore.com.

Contacts

Nadine M. Sarraf | CMO, Prodoscore | 213.262.2551 | [email protected]
Alessandra Nagy| VP, Bospar PR | 714.310.4439 | [email protected]

Remote Launches Interactive, Global Ranking of Best Destinations For Remote Workers OutBuro lgbt professional entreprenuer networking online community gay lesbian transgender queer bisexual nonbinary

Remote Launches Interactive, Global Ranking of Best Destinations For Remote Workers

Remote analyzed every country in the world to determine the best places to work remotely; Toronto, Madrid, and Auckland top the list; others offer unique tax, cash, visa, and other compelling incentives.

SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Remote, a global HR startup that helps companies pay and manage international workers, today released a first-of-its-kind Best Destinations for Remote Work report that showcases the top 100 global destinations for remote workers, along with unique insights into location-specific incentives. The report is paired with an interactive tool and database with information on hundreds of cities across the world for users to create personalized rankings on where to work remotely based on their individual preferences.

Remote’s “Best Destinations for Remote Work” is an in-depth statistical analysis and evaluation of every country in the world and all 50 U.S. states across seven relevant categories: internet infrastructure, attractiveness, safety, quality of life, openness, cost of living, and special incentives for remote workers. To inform overall scores and rankings, Remote incorporated user-defined weights for each of the seven categories.

When attributing equal weights to all seven components, the top 10 destinations for remote work are:

  1. Toronto, Canada
  2. Madrid, Spain
  3. Auckland, New Zealand
  4. Madeira, Portugal
  5. Helsinki, Finland
  6. Svalbard, Norway
  7. Berlin, Germany
  8. Valparaiso, Chile
  9. Dublin, Ireland
  10. Sydney, Australia

Some key findings from the report include:

● None of the top 10 cities were located in the U.S., with heavy representation across Europe and Oceania.

● Auckland, New Zealand; Honolulu, Hawaii; Sydney, Australia; and Reykjavik, Iceland are among the top destinations with the best quality of life for remote workers.

● The most open-minded places are Stockholm, Sweden; Toronto, Canada; and Amsterdam/Netherlands.

● Aruba offers the best incentives for digital nomads through its “One Happy Workation” program.

● Emilia Romagna, Italy has the largest cash incentive, paying young families (under 40 years old) $34,000 to relocate.

● Topeka, Kansas, provides up to $5,000 in funds to rent in one’s first year and up to $10,000 in funds for a home purchase as a relocation incentive.

● Colorado grants employers cash awards for each remote worker employed in an eligible rural county outside the county where the project is based.

● Remote workers in Cabo Verde are exempt from income tax.

● Ecuador offers a professional visa that offers the lowest monthly income requirement of any country at $400.

● St. Louis, Missouri, has the best housing incentive where individuals can purchase city-owned property for only $1.

“For a long time, workers were restricted to living near major urban hubs if they wanted to access the best job opportunities. The freedom to work from anywhere opens the door for employees to choose their home – or travel – without compromising their work,” said Remote’s CEO and co-founder Job van der Voort. “With so many possibilities, our interactive ranking tool aims to find the perfect destination for everyone based on what they value most. We’re excited to share this truly global database and interactive tool to empower remote workers and global employers.”

About Remote

Remote empowers companies of all sizes to pay and manage full-time and contract workers around the world. We take care of international payroll, benefits, taxes, stock options, and compliance in dozens of countries. Our people are on the ground on every continent, building culturally aware employment packages that help you build trust with your global team. Our ironclad intellectual property protections and industry-leading security guarantee give you peace of mind across the globe. Best of all, Remote never charges percentages or fees: one low flat rate helps you control your budget so you can focus on growing your business.

Contacts

[email protected]
Lauren Armour

07826557326

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Grant Thornton survey: Employees value flexibility over salary increases — one-third looking for new jobs

  • 40% will look for another job if forced to return to the office full time
  • 56% are looking forward to returning to the office
  • 51% would give up a salary increase for more flexibility in when and where they work
  • 40% do not feel like their voice is heard at work
  • 34% believe their manager is the most stressful part of the day

CHICAGO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Grant Thornton LLP, a leading professional services firm, has released a survey that helps explain why millions of people have left their jobs in recent months. The firm’s State of Work in America survey engaged more than 1,500 full-time employees of U.S. companies. Through questions about hybrid work, healthcare, culture and benefits, Grant Thornton has shone a light on what employees value — and what companies can do to retain talent.

According to the survey, the trend that experts have dubbed “The Great Resignation” may not end anytime soon: 33% of survey respondents say they are actively looking for a new job.

“There is most definitely a war for talent occurring, with an intensity unseen in recent years,” says Tim Glowa, a principal and leader of Grant Thornton’s employee listening and human capital services offerings. “Our survey finds that workers want flexibility. But ‘flexibility’ does not mean working from home 100% of the time, and physically returning to work does not mean being in the office five days a week.”

Instead, Glowa explains employees want workplaces that are understanding of responsibilities like childcare and eldercare.

“Everyone has a unique set of responsibilities outside of the office,” Glowa adds. “As companies return to the office, it will be more crucial than ever to give people the time they need to take care of what’s important at home.”

Return to work

Among those polled for Grant Thornton’s State of Work in America survey, 56% are looking forward to physically returning to the office. However, it appears the requirement to be in the office full-time is a driving factor that is motivating record resignation. According to the survey, 79% of survey respondents say they want flexibility in when and where they work, while 40% say they will look for another job if forced to return to the office full time.

“The challenge that companies face is creating an engaging experience for all employees, whether they are working in an office or remotely,” says Jennifer Morelli, a principal and leader of Grant Thornton’s Business Change Enablement practice. “Organizations need to make sure they are providing meaningful opportunities and reasons to come into the office. For example, in-person working sessions, an important meeting or a team-building event.”

Ultimately, the State of Work in America survey revealed that flexibility is perhaps one of the most desired attributes in the modern workplace. More than half (51%) of the employees interviewed by Grant Thornton say they would give up a 10%-20% salary increase for more flexibility.

“People value employers that respect their time, their family responsibilities and their work-life balance,” says Glowa. “Employers that put that respect into action are well-positioned to win the ongoing war for talent.”

Retaining talent during “The Great Resignation”

While employers have been pondering their return-to-work strategies, the benefits landscape has changed. Grant Thornton’s State of Work in America survey shows that many employees are satisfied with their benefits, but a large contingent have significant concerns over healthcare. Approximately 30% of survey respondents feel like the amount they pay for healthcare is not transparent, and they are not confident that they have chosen the best medical plan.

Grant Thornton leaders say that addressing those concerns will require both detailed communication and ongoing benefits evaluation. Through a process called ‘employee preference optimization,’ companies can find ways to enhance the benefits people use and value — and save money at the same time. Frequent check-ins and active listening are also vital, as is a concise yet effective internal communications plan that relays key benefits information.

“To better attract and retain employees — especially in a tight labor market — requires thinking like a marketing professional,” Glowa adds. “You need to understand employee pain points, then brainstorm potential solutions and benefits to address them. If you can fix that pain point, you’ve made a big difference in the eyes of employees — ideally, in a way that is difficult for competitors to replicate.”

Those concerns about healthcare also seem to have a direct impact on workplace stress. As this survey reveals, medical issues are one of the most common sources of stress, surpassed only by personal debt. Ability to retire, work-life balance and mental health round out the list of top five sources of stress. However, some of the most common pain points are directly related to workplace culture.

Almost half (45%) of survey respondents say they do not believe their employer understands their needs as an employee, and 40% say they do not feel like their voices are heard at work. Further, 34% indicate interacting with their manager is the most stressful part of the day. This could be due to management style or the sheer fact some managers don’t have the proper training.

Grant Thornton leaders emphasize that there is no one-size-fits-all solution to these issues. Yet, as Glowa puts it, “thinking like a marketing professional” can lead to better value propositions for employees — and ultimately help retention. Companies may need to focus on training stronger managers, optimizing their benefits and total reward packages, or enhancing workplace culture.

But no matter what steps companies take, the State of Work in America survey indicates that the employee experience — and understanding what keeps your people up at night — must take precedence.

“There is a bright spotlight on leadership and how leaders are treating employees,” Glowa concludes. “Leaders need to walk the talk, because employees are watching closely.”

To see additional findings from Grant Thornton’s State of Work in America survey, visit www.grantthornton.com/library/articles/tax/2021/assessing-the-state-of-american-workers. To view a webcast that examines the State of Work in America survey in more detail, visit: www.grantthornton.com/events/tax/2021/10-07-the-state-of-work-in-america.

About Grant Thornton LLP

Founded in Chicago in 1924, Grant Thornton LLP (Grant Thornton) is the U.S. member firm of Grant Thornton International Ltd, one of the world’s leading organizations of independent audit, tax and advisory firms. Grant Thornton, which has revenues of $1.97 billion and operates more than 50 offices, works with a broad range of dynamic publicly and privately held companies, government agencies, financial institutions, and civic and religious organizations.

“Grant Thornton” refers to Grant Thornton LLP, the U.S. member firm of Grant Thornton International Ltd (GTIL). GTIL and the member firms are not a worldwide partnership. Services are delivered by the member firms. GTIL and its member firms are not agents of, and do not obligate, one another and are not liable for one another’s acts or omissions. Please see grantthornton.com for further details.

Contacts

Adam Bond

T +1 312 602 8332

E [email protected]
S twitter.com/grantthorntonus
linkd.in/grantthorntonus

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Career Development Is Essential to Improving the “Employee Experience”

Internal certification programs make career development meaningful and measurable

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–#Questionmark–As high numbers of workers look set to change jobs as part of the “great resignation”, employers are upping the ante on staff retention by seeking ways to improve the “employee experience”.

Questionmark, the online assessment provider, is urging managers to put career development at the heart of that employee experience in 2022 — or risk losing staff.

In a bid to retain the best talent, employers have been focusing on making changes to the workplace environment and improving relationships between team members and managers. Yet a new survey of American workers reveals that career development remains the most important retention factor. Nearly two thirds (64 percent) say they would leave their job in 2022, citing a lack of growth, training, and development opportunities.1

Neil McGough, General Manager of Questionmark, said: “A company’s culture plays a pivotal role in employee retention. There is a view that the only way employers can stave off the threat of the ‘great resignation’ is to look with fresh eyes at the ‘employee experience’. Yet workers remain consistent that their number one demand is career development. It is essential that employers re-invest in their teams and find a way to increase a sense of career development across their organizations.”

Career development works best when it is meaningful and measurable. By issuing internal certificates and digital badges, underpinned by robust assessment or skills development, employers can help team members mark and recognize their progress.

www.questionmark.com

About Questionmark

Questionmark unlocks performance through reliable and secure online assessments.

Questionmark provides a secure enterprise-grade assessment platform and professional services to leading organizations around the world, delivered with care and unequalled expertise. Its full-service online assessment tool and professional services help customers to improve their performance and meet their compliance requirements. Questionmark enables organizations to unlock their potential by delivering assessments which are valid, reliable, fair and defensible.

Questionmark offers secure powerful integration with other LMS, LRS and proctoring services making it easy to bring everything together in one place. Questionmark’s cloud-based assessment management platform offers rapid deployment, scalability for high-volume test delivery, 24/7 support, and the peace-of-mind of secure, audited U.S., Australian and European-based data centers.


1 https://www.inc.com/rebecca-deczynski/employee-training-upskilling-retention-survey.html

Contacts

US: Kristin Bernor, external relations: [email protected] +1 203.349.6438

UK: Peter Sigrist: [email protected] +44 7720 056 981

Australia and New Zealand: Chelsea Dowd: [email protected] +61 2 8073 0527

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UKG Workforce Activity Report: September Shift Work Shrinks, Further Delaying Recovery

LOWELL, Mass. & WESTON, Fla.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–#Economics–UKG (Ultimate Kronos Group):

National Overview:

The number of shifts1 worked by U.S. employees declined for the second consecutive month, decreasing by 0.1% in September, according to the UKG Workforce Activity Report. While another month of shift contraction further delays the employment recovery for millions of people, September marks a significant improvement from August’s 2.4% monthly decline, indicating a stabilization in workplace activity, per the high-frequency data from UKG (Ultimate Kronos Group).

Commentary:

Dave Gilbertson, vice president, UKG
By most predictions, September was supposed to bring a return of strong economic and workplace activity, as schools reopened fully and unemployment benefits expired. This simply wasn’t the case. Concerns about personal health, as the Delta variant spread, likely prevented many people from rejoining the workforce. As cases decline, we are feeling optimistic about future growth overall, but are closely watching the impact of supply chain disruptions in manufacturing and lackluster activity in the retail sector. With the ongoing labor shortage still in full force, retailers will need to offer more than just higher pay to entice people to staff stores as the holiday shopping season rapidly approaches.”

Industry Analysis:

On the eve of the holiday shopping season, retailers are anticipating the most challenging holiday hiring season (see separate annual UKG retail survey) in memory. September shift work trends illustrate retail’s present struggles:

  • Retail, hospitality, and food service: -3.7%
  • Healthcare: -0.1%
  • Manufacturing: 0.8%
  • Services and distribution: 1.1%

Region Snapshot:

For the second consecutive month, the Southeast region saw the most significant shift volume contraction:

  • Southeast2: -0.8%
  • Midwest 3: -0.7%
  • Northeast 4: -0.5%
  • West 5: 1.3%

Business Size:

Ongoing labor shortages and supply chain disruptions continue to impact businesses:

  • Fewer than 100 employees: 0.3%
  • 101-500: -0.6%
  • 501-1,000: 2.6%
  • 1,001-2,500: -2.2%
  • 2,501-5,000: 0.0%
  • More than 5,000: -10.6%

Recovery Scale:

The UKG Workforce Recovery Scale — which compares shift activity with pre-pandemic levels — sits at 85.2 in September, effectively flat compared with August.

Timeliness:

The UKG Workforce Activity Report is a high-frequency index used to anticipate U.S. job creation earlier than traditional economic indicators. With a sample of 3.3 million employees across 35,000 organizations of all sizes and industries, the report analyzes mid-month shift work trends to gauge current and future employment changes.

About UKG

At UKG (Ultimate Kronos Group), our purpose is people. Built from a merger that created one of the largest cloud companies in the world, UKG believes organizations succeed when they focus on their people. As a leading global provider of HCM, payroll, HR service delivery, and workforce management solutions, UKG delivers award-winning Pro, Dimensions, and Ready solutions to help tens of thousands of organizations across geographies and in every industry drive better business outcomes, improve HR effectiveness, streamline the payroll process, and help make work a better, more connected experience for everyone. UKG has 13,000 employees around the globe and is known for an inclusive workplace culture. The company has earned numerous awards for culture, products, and services, including consecutive years on Fortune’s 100 Best Companies to Work For list. To learn more, visit ukg.com.

Footnote 1: “Shifts worked” is a total derived from aggregated employee time and attendance data and reflects the number of times that employees, especially those who are paid hourly or must be physically present at a workplace to perform their jobs, “clock in” and “clock out” via a time clock, mobile app, computer, or other device at the beginning and end of each shift.

Footnote 2: Southeast is defined as Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

Footnote 3: Midwest is defined as Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wisconsin.

Footnote 4: Northeast is defined as Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia.

Footnote 5: West is defined as Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

Copyright 2021 UKG Inc. All rights reserved. For a full list of UKG trademarks, please visit ukg.com/trademarks. All other trademarks, if any, are property of their respective owners. All specifications are subject to change.

Follow UKG on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Contacts

UKG Contact:
Jessica DeVore

+1 978 244 6381

[email protected]

For Sales Information:
UKG

+1 800 432 1729

ukg.com

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New Study From Mind Share Partners In Partnership With Qualtrics And ServiceNow: Employee Mental Health Challenges Now Impact The Majority Of U.S. Workers—Persisting Longer And Pushing More Employees To Leave Their Jobs

Follow-On Study Offers A Rare Pre- And Post-Pandemic Comparison On The State Of Workplace Mental Health And Spotlights The Heightened Stakes For Employers

SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Mind Share Partners, a national nonprofit that is changing the culture of workplace mental health, launched “Mind Share Partners’ 2021 Mental Health at Work Report in partnership with Qualtrics and ServiceNow”—a study that explores mental health, stigma, and work culture in U.S. workplaces. This year’s study is sponsored by ServiceNow and Morrison & Foerster and is a follow-on to the 2019 Mental Health at Work Report.

Read more about the findings in our Harvard Business Review article.

The study reveals that mental health challenges are impacting a majority of U.S. workers at all levels of seniority for significant periods of time. 76% of full-time U.S. workers reported experiencing at least one symptom of a mental health condition in the past year (a 29% increase from 2019), with 80% of study respondents reporting their symptoms cumulatively lasting a month or more, and 36% reporting symptoms lasting five months to an entire year. Executive and C-level employees were more likely to report experiencing at least one mental health symptom, compared to managers and individual contributors.

With a growing dialogue around “The Great Resignation,” there are clear correlations to employers losing talent due to unsupported mental health challenges. The study found that 50% of respondents had left a previous role at a company due, at least in part, to mental health reasons, compared to 34% in 2019. This number grows to 81% for Gen Z and 68% for Millennial respondents.

“Prior to the pandemic, U.S. employers had just begun to acknowledge the prevalence and impact of mental health challenges at work, the need to address stigma, as well as the emerging link to diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI),” said Kelly Greenwood, Founder & CEO of Mind Share Partners.

“The stakes have been raised. Companies must move from viewing mental health as an individual’s responsibility to a collective priority. The future of workplace mental health demands culture change. Everyone within an organization plays a unique role in creating a mentally healthy workplace, with leadership paving the way. We can’t afford to go back to ‘business as usual’. Now is the time to be intentional and imagine what work could be—with more vulnerability, compassion, and sustainable ways of working,” Greenwood said.

Other Key Findings Include:

Workplace factors have a clear impact on mental health.

  • 84% of study respondents reported at least one workplace factor that negatively impacted their mental health in the past year—the most common being emotionally draining work (37%).
  • Employers’ return to office plans are negatively impacting mental health. The most common ways were the policies themselves around in-person vs. remote work after the pandemic (41%) and lack of work-life balance or flexibility based on the policy (37%).
  • The study found that employees who have felt supported by their employers with the pandemic, racial injustices, return to office planning, and/or mental health overall have better mental health and engagement outcomes.

Employees are talking about mental health more, but their comfort levels and experience of these conversations are still mixed.

  • Two-thirds (65%) of study respondents reported having talked about their mental health to someone at work in the past year—a 63% increase from 40% in 2019.
  • 41% of study respondents felt comfortable talking to their colleagues about their own mental health—a 46% increase from 2019 (28%); 40% felt comfortable talking to managers—a 38% increase from 2019 (29%); and 37% to HR—a 48% increase from 2019 (25%).
  • Only 49% of respondents described their experience of talking about mental health at work as positive or that they received a positive or supportive response—comparable to rates in 2019 (48%).

Diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) programs continue to play a strong role in workplace mental health, but significant investment and commitment are needed to alleviate disproportionate challenges exacerbated by the events of 2020, including, but not limited to, systemic racism and trauma experienced by Black employees and school closures due to Covid-19 impacting parents and caregivers.

  • Younger workers (i.e., Gen Z and Millennial respondents), caregivers, and respondents from historically underrepresented communities (including LGBTQ+, transgender, Black, and Latinx respondents) tended to be more likely to experience mental health symptoms, more likely to say that work or the workplace environment negatively impacted their mental health, and more likely to have left a previous role due, at least in part, to mental health reasons.
  • Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders were among those who felt the least supported amidst the pandemic and racial hate crimes / injustices, alongside Native American respondents for the pandemic, and mixed-race respondents for the racial hate crimes / injustices.

Employers are investing more into mental health and employees are increasingly drawn to day-to-day support versus temporary, Band-Aid solutions.

  • Resources provided by employers to employees grew since the pandemic, including extra paid time off (55% growth), mental health days (41% growth), and mental health training (33% growth).
  • There was significant growth in the use of accommodations by employees.
  • The “resource” most desired by respondents (31%) was a more open culture around mental health.

Employers are deepening their investment in supporting mental health at work through company culture, but still haven’t achieved true culture change.

  • 32% more respondents believe that mental health was actually prioritized at their company (54% in 2021; 41% in 2019).
  • 27% more respondents believe their company leaders were advocates for mental health at work (47% in 2021; 37% in 2019). 21% more respondents believe that their manager was equipped to support them if they had a mental health condition or symptom (47% in 2021; 39% in 2019).

The study indicates an overarching theme that the future of workplace mental health is through employer investment in culture change—including sustainable ways of working. Employers must shift their view of mental health from being an “individual’s issue” to a company priority. Mind Share Partners’ Ecosystem of a Mentally Healthy Workplace Framework highlights how everyone within an organization has a role in influencing and changing the broader culture around work and mental health.

“The past year has highlighted the impact mental health has had on so many of our colleagues and employees,” said Qualtrics Chief People Officer Julia Anas. “Whether employees need someone to talk to, flexibility to take care of themselves, their families and friends, or recognition for their success, it’s imperative that company leaders listen, understand, and lead with empathy in helping employees find solutions. Each individual is unique, so there is not a one-size-fits-all approach, but it starts with listening, followed by taking action.”

“We are not the same workers we once were,” said Nick Tzitzon, Chief Strategy and Corporate Affairs Officer at ServiceNow. “As leaders, we need the grace and imagination to open the conversation about mental health, starting and supporting frank, sometimes difficult, conversations in the workplace.”

This study is based on collected responses from 1,500 individuals via an online survey from May 21, 2021 to June 18, 2021 through Qualtrics. To download the full findings please visit: www.mindsharepartners.org/mentalhealthatworkreport-2021-download

About Mind Share Partners

Mind Share Partners is a national nonprofit that is changing the culture of workplace mental health so that both employees and organizations can thrive. It does this by building public awareness, hosting communities to support employee resource groups (or affinity groups) and professionals, and providing workplace mental health training and strategic advising to leading companies. Learn more at www.mindsharepartners.org.

About Qualtrics

Qualtrics, the world’s #1 Experience Management (XM) provider and creator of the XM category, is changing the way organizations manage and improve the four core experiences of business—customer, employee, product, and brand. Over 13,500 organizations around the world are using Qualtrics to listen, understand, and take action on experience data (X-data™)—the beliefs, emotions, and intentions that tell you why things are happening, and what to do about it. To learn more, please visit qualtrics.com.

About ServiceNow

ServiceNow (NYSE: NOW) is making the world of work, work better for people. Our cloud‑based platform and solutions deliver digital workflows that create great experiences and unlock productivity for employees and the enterprise. For more information, visit: servicenow.com.

Contacts

Nina Tomaro

Marketing and Communications Lead

Mind Share Partners

[email protected]

Erica Evans

Qualtrics Public Relations

[email protected]

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Major US Healthcare Labor Shortages Projected in Every State by 2026, Mental Health Professionals Grow in High Demand, Mercer Report Shows

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Even before COVID-19, the US healthcare labor market faced remarkable challenges with the demand for healthcare professionals outpacing supply. As the US continues to grapple with the pandemic, those healthcare professionals will get stretched further. Mercer’s “2021 External Healthcare Labor Market Analysis” released today identifies four key trends impacting the US healthcare labor market over the next five and ten years, and reveals how the healthcare industry needs to adapt to address future labor shortages.

“The healthcare workforce is burned-out following a nearly two-year face-off against COVID-19. The demands placed on healthcare workers since the start of the pandemic have been unrelenting and overall, this data shows that there will not be enough healthcare workers to fill demand in the near future,” said John Derse, Healthcare Industry Leader, Mercer. “This impact will be felt by all of us, regardless of where we live or our field of work.”

The exact deficit depends on the specific role and geography, but a few common themes emerge: the US is losing healthcare professionals to burnout and at a rate faster than expected, a significant portion of physicians plan to retire, and there will be a sharp increase in demand for mental health professionals and low-wage healthcare workers in the near term. Every state is different, and every healthcare system should assess how anticipated projections to their external labor markets will ultimately affect workforce strategies and patient outcomes in the coming years.

1. There will be a shortage of healthcare workers at the low-end of the wage spectrum, which will directly impact access to home care

About 9.7M individuals currently work in critical, albeit lower-wage, healthcare occupations (e.g., medical assistants, home health aides, nursing assistants, etc.). The need for these workers is likely to grow in the coming years, as the aging population will increase demand for healthcare workers while healthcare labor is permanently leaving these occupations. In fact, Mercer’s research shows more than 6.5M individuals will permanently leave this critical workforce in the near future. The result – a substantial shortage of workers in the next five years. New York and California will have the largest labor shortages of this workforce, each projected to fall short by over 500,000 workers by 2026. Only a few states in the country are projected to have surplus labor in low-wage healthcare workers, including Washington, Georgia and South Carolina.

2. Primary care will increasingly be provided by non-physicians

The primary care landscape and how primary care services are delivered is anticipated to change over the next five years as 21% of family medicine, pediatric and OB/GYN, and other primary care physicians will move into retirement age. Yet, demand for primary care physicians will grow by over 4% during the same time period. The result will be a shift towards primary care being provided by physicians’ assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs).

3. There will be significant shortages of nurses in over half of US states, but surplus in some areas of the South and Southwest

Just over 3M individuals work as registered nurses in the US and demand for these professionals will grow by at least 5% over the next five years. With nearly 1M workers expected to permanently leave the profession, over half of US states will not be able to fill demand for nursing talent. The largest projected shortages of nursing talent will be in Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Colorado, Illinois, and Massachusetts. However, in the South and Southwest, new entrants into the local nursing workforce are likely to outpace local demand due to new graduates and historical migration patterns. States like Georgia, Texas and South Carolina may start to build a surplus of registered nurses in the workforce.

4. A hiring rush for mental health providers will emerge by 2026

There will be a 10% increase in demand for mental health workers by 2026. During this time, 400,000 are anticipated to leave the occupation entirely, resulting in twenty-seven states that will be unable to meet hiring demands for skilled and semi-skilled mental health workers. While Massachusetts, Illinois, Pennsylvania, California, and Colorado are expected to have the largest shortages of these professionals, Washington, Texas, Ohio, Florida, and Georgia will each build surplus due to a steady flow of new entrants and that individuals in these regions are leaving mental health occupations at a slower rate than in other states.

“While hospitals and healthcare systems cannot control what’s happening in the external labor market, effective workforce planning and managing internal workforces can help mitigate their exposure to these risks. Workforce strategies that will position an employer for long-term success should focus on transforming care models, rethink compensation and benefits, and introduce more flexibility into staffing, development and rewards,” added Derse. “Prior to the pandemic, the shortages were driven by a healthcare population that was trending older, sicker and more sedentary. Employers should not wait to transform their retention models to accommodate for all demographics in their workforce impacted by the pandemic, particularly ageing skilled professionals considering early retirement.”

Click here to see an interactive map of US healthcare labor projections over five years across six types of healthcare providers.

About the 2021 External Healthcare Labor Market Analysis

Based on Mercer research, publicly available data, and data provided by Emsi, the 2021 External Healthcare Labor Market Analysis examined the changing healthcare labor markets of the next five to ten years in all 50 states at the country, state, regional and national levels. The interactive map here features a small subset of the healthcare workforce at a broad geographic level and insights from Mercer and other Marsh McLennan businesses on the proprietary database of over 80 healthcare roles, projected over 10 years at the county and metropolitan statistical area level. If you’d like to learn more, click here.

About Mercer

Mercer believes in building brighter futures by redefining the world of work, reshaping retirement and investment outcomes, and unlocking real health and well-being. Mercer’s approximately 25,000 employees are based in 43 countries and the firm operates in 130 countries. Mercer is a business of Marsh McLennan (NYSE: MMC), the world’s leading professional services firm in the areas of risk, strategy and people, with 78,000 colleagues and annual revenue of over $18 billion. Through its market-leading businesses including Marsh, Guy Carpenter and Oliver Wyman, Marsh McLennan helps clients navigate an increasingly dynamic and complex environment. For more information, visit mercer.com. Follow Mercer on LinkedIn and Twitter.

About Marsh McLennan

Marsh McLennan (NYSE: MMC) is the world’s leading professional services firm in the areas of risk, strategy and people. The Company’s 78,000 colleagues advise clients in 130 countries. With annual revenue over $18 billion, Marsh McLennan helps clients navigate an increasingly dynamic and complex environment through four market-leading businesses. Marsh provides data-driven risk advisory services and insurance solutions to commercial and consumer clients. Guy Carpenter develops advanced risk, reinsurance and capital strategies that help clients grow profitably and pursue emerging opportunities. Mercer delivers advice and technology-driven solutions that help organizations redefine the world of work, reshape retirement and investment outcomes, and unlock health and well being for a changing workforce. Oliver Wyman serves as a critical strategic, economic and brand advisor to private sector and governmental clients. For more information, visit mmc.com, follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter or subscribe to BRINK.

Contacts

Micaela McPadden
201-694-9719

[email protected]

OutBuro lgbt professional entreprenuer networking online community gay lesbian transgender queer bisexual nonbinary 2

Employers Need a Break With the Past to Trigger the “Great Rehire”

With evidence growing of a mismatch between job openings and candidates, there needs to be a renewed focus on modern skills

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–#Questionmark–The hiring system appears to be broken, with record job openings failing to trigger a “great rehire” because of an outdated focus on the wrong skills, says online assessment provider Questionmark.1

A recent survey of unemployed workers found over two thirds (70 percent) of job seekers were frustrated they could not find the right job to apply for. The majority (59 percent) also claimed there aren’t enough openings in their preferred profession. 2

Hiring for modern skills like critical thinking, problem-solving and digital literacy could be the answer, according to Questionmark. It appeals both to what employers increasingly need and what employees are looking for to advance their careers.

Neil McGough, General Manager of Questionmark, said: “After the ‘great resignation’ everyone has been waiting for the ’great rehire‘ but what has emerged is a serious mismatch between employer requirements and employee expectations. This problem could be mitigated by a renewed focus on modern skills. Employers need to assess the skills of their current workforce and review how required skills are presented in job specs and recruitment ads.”

Questionmark’s report “Modern Skills for a Post-Pandemic World” sets out the skills that would not traditionally be included in a generic job specification, but which employers now need and employees may find more attractive. These include:

  • Technology skills such as digital collaboration, digital communication, cybersecurity awareness and understanding artificial intelligence (AI)
  • Cognitive skills such as critical thinking and problem solving, data literacy, communication and creativity
  • Cultural skills such as accountability, collaboration and teamwork, and compliance

Questionmark urges employers to use assessments to gather real information about the modern skills that their current workforce has, and those offered by candidates through the recruitment process. A clear grasp of these alongside the technical skills associated with a role could provide a more appealing way to frame a job opening, helping to close the skills gap that is threatening to slow economic growth.3

www.questionmark.com

Ends

Notes to editors

About Questionmark

Questionmark unlocks performance through reliable and secure online assessments.

Questionmark provides a secure enterprise-grade assessment platform and professional services to leading organizations around the world, delivered with care and unequalled expertise. Its full-service online assessment tool and professional services help customers to improve their performance and meet their compliance requirements. Questionmark enables organizations to unlock their potential by delivering assessments which are valid, reliable, fair and defensible.

Questionmark offers secure powerful integration with other LMS, LRS and proctoring services making it easy to bring everything together in one place. Questionmark’s cloud-based assessment management platform offers rapid deployment, scalability for high-volume test delivery, 24/7 support, and the peace-of-mind of secure, audited U.S., Australian and European-based data centres.


1 https://apnews.com/article/health-coronavirus-pandemic-business-38685e73f4d7d7e51952263586896680
2 https://www.flexjobs.com/blog/post/job-seekers-frustrated-by-lack-of-opportunities/
3 https://finance.yahoo.com/news/skills-gap-may-turn-into-skills-canyon-by-end-of-pandemic-executive-warns-143047625.html

Contacts

For more information:

US: Kristin Bernor, external relations: [email protected] +1 203.349.6438

UK: Peter Sigrist: [email protected] +44 7720 056 981

Australia and New Zealand: Chelsea Dowd: [email protected] +61 2 8073 0527