Hilton - LGBT Employees Rate Employer Review Company Employee Branding OutBuro - Corporate Workplace Equality Gay Lesbian Queer Diversity Inclusion

Hilton – Named #1 Workplace for Diversity

Hilton has been recognized as the #1 best workplace for Diversity and Inclusion just one week after also being ranked the #1 best workplace for Parents by Great Places to Work. These extraordinary acknowledgments underscore the sense of family and belonging that are the foundation of outstanding workplace culture.

Hilton offers programs to help all Team Members – both hourly and salaried – thrive personally and professionally. Benefits supporting working parents include flexible working environments, parental leaveadoption assistance, GED support, and 10-day advanced scheduling that provides hotel Team Members the flexibility to plan their lives.

“At Hilton, we know how important it is to create a great place to work for all, so that our workforce can truly reflect and connect with the communities where we live and work,” said Christopher J. Nassetta, president & CEO of Hilton. “I hear inspiring stories every day about the experiences our Team Members have with us, and it’s clear by investing in our Hilton family, we are making the world a better place for our Team Members and guests.”

Programs that foster diversity and inclusion include Team Member Resource Groups, Regional Inclusion Groups, Leadership and Career Development Tools and supplier diversity programs that has allowed Hilton to cultivate relationships with more than 3,000 women-, minority-, Veteran-, and LGBTQ-owned businesses.

“We’re deeply committed to recruiting and retaining Team Members who represent many different backgrounds, cultures and perspectives,” said Matthew W. Schuyler, Chief Human Resources Officer, Hilton. “Our goal is to be the most hospitable company in the world and the most inclusive place to work. Empowering a diverse workforce is fundamental to our success.”

These recognitions demonstrate Hilton’s ongoing journey to create a great place to work for all. Recent distinctions include: #2 on the World’s Best Workplaces list, #14th Best Workplace for Women in the U.S. and a Best Workplace for Millennials in Italy (#6). Hilton has also been recognized as a “Great Place To Work” in 12 countries: Australia (#4) China (#6), Colombia (#12), India (#18), Italy (#2), Netherlands (#11), Peru (#3), Turkey (#2), United Arab Emirates (#7), United Kingdom (#6), Mexico (#4), Brazil (#17) and United States (#33).

About Hilton

Hilton (NYSE: HLT) is a leading global hospitality company with a portfolio of 15 world-class brands comprising more than 5,500 properties with nearly 895,000 rooms, in 109 countries and territories. Dedicated to fulfilling its mission to be the world’s most hospitable company, Hilton earned a spot on the 2018 world’s best workplaces list, and has welcomed more than 3 billion guests in its nearly 100 year history. Through the award-winning guest loyalty program, Hilton Honors, nearly 82 million members who book directly with Hilton have access to instant benefits, including digital check-in with room selection, Digital Key, and Connected Room. Visit newsroom.hilton.com for more information, and connect with Hilton on FacebookTwitterLinkedInInstagram, and YouTube.

Contacts

Alison Scott, Hilton
703.883.6638
Alison.Scott@hilton.com

Do you have a business new tip affecting the LGBTQ community?  Drop us a note to let us know.  

OutBuro where you belong lgbtq entrprenuers out gay business owers lesbian startups queer professionals employer ratings customer reviews bisexual transgender equality community 1
Dow Highlights First Inclusion Report - Outstanding LGBT+ Employee Work CultureLGBT Employees Rate Employer Review Company Employee Branding OutBuro - Corporate Workplace Equality Gay Lesbian Queer Diversity Inclusion

Dow Highlights First Inclusion Report – Outstanding LGBT+ Employee Work Culture

Dow today released its first-ever annual Inclusion Report, titled SHINE, which puts a spotlight on the Company’s global INclusion 2020 strategy and progress in 2017.

Dow accelerated actions, deepened its commitment to strengthening inclusion and diversity (I&D) across the organization and implemented a fully integrated and holistic strategy. This included institutionalizing a new I&D governance structure that shares ownership among Dow’s leadership and drives accountability for creating a more inclusive work environment down and across the Company. Building an inclusive workplace for all will benefit employees, customers, suppliers, communities and the bottom line.

“Inclusion is essential to Dow’s future success and this report demonstrates our strong commitment to being transparent about our progress and holding ourselves accountable,” said Jim Fitterling, the chief executive officer of Dow. “Our goal is to build a culture where everyone is respected and valued and has an equal opportunity to develop, advance and be heard.”

“At Dow, we intentionally lead with inclusion because, without it, we cannot attract, retain or engage a talented and diverse workforce or reap the full human and financial benefits,” said Karen S. Carter, chief human resources officer, and chief inclusion officer of Dow. “There is little value in a diverse workforce if you do not have an inclusive culture that encourages and enables all people to make their fullest contribution.”

GLAD - Dow Chemical LGBT+ Employee Resource Group - OutBuro - Gay Professional Network LGBT Business News Information GLBT Friendly Employer Lesbian Queer Community JobDow has many Employee Resource Group to support and empower it’s employees.  GLAD is the chemical industry’s first LGBTQ+ employee resource group. It was formed more than 15 years ago, to improve equality for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and heteroflexible in the workplace.  GLAD has 120 local chapters globally.

The SHINE Inclusion report focuses on three areas:

Illuminating the Path Forward: Dow appointed its first-ever chief inclusion officer, created a governance structure that drives accountability for I&D, and developed and implemented a global inclusion strategy that is an integral part of the business strategy. The Company intentionally leads with inclusion because, without an inclusive workplace, diversity is just a numbers game.

Championing Inclusion, Shining Brighter Together: Dow is helping its employees shine brighter through global I&D workshops and skills development programs for leaders and employees, and supporting several employee resource groups (ERGs). ERGs are fostering a culture of inclusion by functioning as catalysts that help drive culture change and advance business results. More than 10,000 employees globally were involved in at least one of Dow’s eight ERGs which included 186 chapters in 2017. The Company also launched two new ERGs in 2018 focused on new and mature employee groups.

Shining Light on Inclusion beyond Dow’s Borders: Dow’s work in inclusion is also focused on customers, suppliers and the larger community. The Company’s efforts include developing a more diverse supplier base, supporting public policy that contributes to a more inclusive workplace and building the skilled workforce of tomorrow that will meet customers’ needs.

To learn more about Dow’s INclusion 2020 Strategy and progress, view the full report, visit www.dow.com.

Dow - GLAD <a href=

For more about DOW and it’s LGBT Employee environment check out the below:

More on OutBüro:

About Dow

Dow combines science and technology knowledge to develop premier materials science solutions that are essential to human progress. Dow has one of the strongest and broadest toolkits in the industry, with robust technology, asset integration, scale and competitive capabilities that enable it to address complex global issues. Dow’s market-driven, industry-leading portfolio of advanced materials, industrial intermediates, and plastics businesses deliver a broad range of differentiated technology-based products and solutions for customers in high-growth markets such as packaging, infrastructure, and consumer care. Dow is a subsidiary of DowDuPont (NYSE: DWDP), a holding company comprised of Dow and DuPont with the intent to form three strong, independent, publicly traded companies in agriculture, materials science and specialty sectors. More information can be found at www.dow.com.

Contacts

Allison Bushre
Dow Office of Inclusion
+1 (989) 633-5821
Bushre@dow.com

Guillaume Artois
Dow Media Relations
+1 (989) 633-4573
GArtois@dow.com


Have an LGBTQ related news tips focused on the professional side of life? Contact us to get the word out.

OutBuro - LGBT Employer Reviews Company Ratings Directory Entrepreneurs GBLT Professionals Gay Owned Lesbian Transgender Bisexual Community Job Portal Board Postings Career Friendly Workplace Culture

LGBT Diversity And Inclusion Benefits Company Employees Customers - OutBuro Employer Reviews Gay Professional Network Lesbian Networking GLBT Recruiting Queer Bisexual Transgender

LGBT Diversity And Inclusion: Benefits Company, Employees and Customers

Creating a diverse, inclusive and welcoming work environment for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer employees should be a priority for business leaders. For a long time, diversity and inclusion (D&I) has appeared to be about filling a quota or was simply a facade of lip-service verses understanding the value and impact it has. To reap the many benefits diversity and inclusion needs to be a company/organization mission where each employee understands they are valued and, in return, is held accountable for their contribution to the culture.

Some research facts worth knowing:

  • In 2016, nearly two-thirds (65%) of employees felt that respectful treatment of employees was a very important factor in their job satisfaction. (ref. 1)
  • Over the past few years increasingly research studies show that when companies of any size focus on diversity and inclusion (D&I) they experience an increase to the business’ bottom line, improve innovation (ref. 2 & 3), productivity (ref. 4 &5), attract and retain quality employees and experience growth.
  • According to one recent study, companies with higher diversity in management earned 38% more of their revenues, on average, from innovative products and services in the last three years than companies with lower diversity. (ref. 6)
  • Diversity in gender, sexual orientation, country of origin, career path, and industry background are all highly linked to innovation among managers. (ref. 7)
  • Teams that include different viewpoints or thinking styles solve problems faster. (ref. 8)
  • Employees who feel included report higher levels of innovation and company engagement. (ref. 9)
  • In a study on the decision-making behaviors of board directors, “deep-level diversity” (i.e., differences in background, personality, and values) contributed to a higher degree of creativity. (ref. 10)
  • Many studies link diversity to indicators of profitability and financial health, including: (ref. 11 & 12)
    • Accounting returns
    • Cash flow return on investment
    • Earnings Per Share
    • Share price performance
    • Earnings Before Interests and Taxes (EBIT) margins
    • Gross and net margins
    • Investment performance
    • Market performance
    • Market value
    • Revenue
    • Sales growth
  • McKinsey & Company’s study of 1,000 companies in 12 countries found that companies in the top 25% when it comes to diversity among executive leadership teams were more likely to outperform on profitability (21%) and value creation (27%). (ref. 13)
  • Companies in the top 25% for diversity were more likely to achieve above-average profitability—33% for diverse executive teams and 43% for diverse boards.(ref. 14)
  • Companies pay a penalty for a lack of diversity. Companies in the bottom 25% diversity were 29% less likely to experience profitability above the industry average. (ref. 15)

With such benefits to the company, shareholders and employees, over the past few years organizations have become more interested to implement D&I initiatives within their workplaces.

Check out these related articles:

Creating LGBT Diversity at Work

The key to creating LGBT diversity, inclusion and welcoming excellence is teamwork. When you build inclusive small working teams with a diverse range of experience and backgrounds it has been proven to set employees and the organization on a path to success. It fosters employees getting to know one another on a deeper level that aids in overcoming past learned beliefs, stereotypes and prejudices. Strong diversity climates are associated to reduced instances of interpersonal aggression (ref. 16) and discrimination. (ref. 17) This not only benefits the company/organization but also our community and society.

Still today LGBT hiring and promoting discrimination is active. Check out “Study finds LGBT people less likely to be hired, paid less and not promoted” and “Research Finds Females Favor Hiring Gay and Lesbian Job Seekers” for more information.

  • Organizations with strong “diversity climates” (i.e., inclusive work cultures characterized by openness toward others and appreciation of individual differences) are likely to have teams with increased job satisfaction and knowledge sharing. (ref. 18)
  • Employees report experiencing trust and increased engagement at work when they both feel included and perceive that their employer supports diversity practices, such as recruiting diverse job candidates. (ref. 19)
  • Without diverse leaders, women (20%), people of color (24%), and LGBT employees (21%) are less likely to have their ideas endorsed. (ref. 20)
  • Moving toward equal levels of gender representation across job levels may reduce occurrences of workplace harassment. (ref. 21)
  • Inclusion key to team p
  • The addition of women to all-male sales teams contributes to improved team performance. However, teams are more likely to reap the benefits of diversity on team performance when inclusion is part of the organizational culture. (ref. 23)
  • The more psychologically safe employees feel at work, the more likely they are to feel included in their workgroups. (ref. 24)

With different backgrounds and a wide range of experiences both work-related as well as life experiences the team collectively generates a much wider range problem-solving strategy solutions which can improve business operations, product development and service delivery. This is the reason for the company’s potential of improved economic return. Everyone wins from the company as a whole, the owner/shareholders, employees and customers/clients. Teams are as much as 158% more likely to understand target clients/customers/consumers when they have at least one member who represents their target’s gender, race, age, sexual orientation, or culture. (ref. 25)

Company leadership must focus on D&I in terms of talent acquisition, employee retention (ref. 26 & 27), skill development and engagement. Further, at the same time assisting and enabling our teams fostering inclusion in the workplace. One example would be encouraging employees to form an LGBT employee resource group to foster peer support, mentoring and professional growth. Human Resources and company/organization management may leverage the LGBT employee resource group for insights on how to improve the

As LGBT employees, there can be lots of fear about coming out at work. This hampers risk-taking believing they could be terminated (laid off) for any reason in most states and countries. Great companies of any size create work environments where employees feel safe for being who they are and can openly share their ideas, take calculated risks from the norm to grow innovation.

OutBuro where you belong lgbtq entrprenuers out gay business owers lesbian startups queer professionals employer ratings customer reviews bisexual transgender equality community 1

LGBT Employees Can Double Dip In Diversity

Being LGBT is about the sexuality of the candidate/employee. LGBT people have experiences and backgrounds wider than that and many fit other diverse identities. An LGBT person can be a person of color, disabled, military veteran, and so forth. Therefore having a company concerted effort to recruit quality LGBT candidates can have a multiplying effect on the total diversity makeup of the workforce. For example, a candidate could be a female, lesbian, military veteran, and disabled.


References

1 – Society for Human Resource Management, Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement: The Doors of Opportunity Are Open: Executive Summary (2017): p. 2.

2 – Rocío Lorenzo, Nicole Voigt, Karin Schetelig, Annika Zawadzki, Isabell M. Welpe, and Prisca Brosi, The Mix That Matters: Innovation Through Diversity (The Boston Consulting Group, 2017).

3 – Removed

4 – Meghna Sabharwal, “Is Diversity Management Sufficient? Organizational Inclusion to Further Performance,” Public Personnel Management, vol. 43, no. 2 (2014): p. 1-21.

5 – Derek R. Avery, Patrick F. McKay, Scott Tonidandel, Sabrina D. Volpone, and Mark A. Morris, “Is There a Method to the Madness? Examining How Racioethnic Matching Influences Retail Store Productivity,” Personnel Psychology, vol. 65, no. 1 (2012): p. 167-199.

6 – Rocío Lorenzo, Nicole Voigt, Karin Schetelig, Annika Zawadzki, Isabell M. Welpe, and Prisca Brosi, The Mix That Matters: Innovation Through Diversity (The Boston Consulting Group, 2017).

7 – Rocío Lorenzo, Nicole Voigt, Karin Schetelig, Annika Zawadzki, Isabell M. Welpe, and Prisca Brosi, The Mix That Matters: Innovation Through Diversity (The Boston Consulting Group, 2017).

8 – Alison Reynolds and David Lewis, “Teams Solve Problems Faster When They’re More Cognitively Diverse,” Harvard Business Review (March 30, 2017).

9 – Jeanine Prime and Elizabeth R. Salib, Inclusive Leadership: The View From Six Countries (Catalyst, 2014).

10 – Mariateresa Torchia, Andrea Calabrò, and Michèle Morner, “Board of Directors’ Diversity, Creativity, and Cognitive Conflict: The Role of Board Members’ Interaction,” International Studies of Management & Organization, vol. 45, no. 1 (2015): p. 6-24.

11 – Vanessa Fuhrmans, “Companies With Diverse Executive Teams Posted Bigger Profit Margins, Study Shows,” The Wall Street Journal, January 18, 2018.

12 – For a full overview of research on diversity and financial performance, see: Catalyst, Why Diversity and Inclusion Matter: Financial Performance (August 1, 2018).

13 – The authors measured profitability by average EBIT margin and value creation by economic profit (EP) margin. Vivian Hunt, Sara Prince, Sundiatu Dixon-Fryle, and Lareina Yee, Delivering Through Diversity (McKinsey & Company, 2018).

15 – The authors measured profitability by average EBIT margin. Vivian Hunt, Sara Prince, Sundiatu Dixon-Fryle, and Lareina Yee, Delivering Through Diversity (McKinsey & Company, 2018).

16 – Anat Drach-Zahavy and Revital Trogan, “Opposites Attract or Attack? The Moderating Role of Diversity Climate in the Team Diversity-Interpersonal Aggression Relationship,” Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, vol. 18, no. 4 (2013): p. 449-457.

17 – Stephan A. Boehm, David J.G. Dwertmann, Florian Kunze, Björn Michaelis, Kizzy M. Parks, and Daniel P. McDonald, “Expanding Insights on the Diversity Climate-Performance Link: The Role of Workgroup Discrimination and Group Size,” Human Resource Management, vol. 53, no. 3 (2014): p. 379-402.

19 – Stephanie N. Downey, Lisa van der Werff, Kecia M. Thomas, and Victoria C. Plaut, “The Role of Diversity Practices and Inclusion in Promoting Trust and Employee Engagement,” Journal of Applied Social Psychology, vol. 45, no. 1 (2015): p. 35-44.

20 – Sylvia Ann Hewlett, Melinda Marshall, and Laura Sherbin, “How Diversity Can Drive Innovation,” Harvard Business Review (December 2013).

21 – Dana Kabat-Farr and Lilia M. Cortina, “Sex-Based Harassment in Employment: New Insights into Gender and Context,” Law and Human Behavior, vol. 38, no. 1 (2014): p. 58-72; Lindsey Joyce Chamberlain, Martha Crowley, Daniel Tope, and Randy Hodson, “Sexual Harassment in Organizational Context,” Work and Occupations, vol. 35, no. 3 (2008): p. 262-295.

22 – Ream A. Shoreibah, Greg W. Marshall, and Jule B. Gassenheimer, “Toward a Framework for Mixed-Gender Selling Teams and the Impact of Increased Female Presence on Team Performance: Thought Development and Propositions,” Industrial Marketing Management, in press (2017).

23 – Ream A. Shoreibah, Greg W. Marshall, and Jule B. Gassenheimer, “Toward a Framework for Mixed-Gender Selling Teams and the Impact of Increased Female Presence on Team Performance: Thought Development and Propositions,” Industrial Marketing Management, in press (2017).

24 – Sharing innovative solutions at work often comes with the risk of being discredited or damaging reputations. Psychological safety is the ability of team members to feel safe when taking these risks—the team “has their backs.” Psychologically safe team members are more willing to speak up, make mistakes, and trust their colleagues to not undermine their work. Jeanine Prime and Elizabeth R. Salib, The Secret to Inclusion in Australian Workplaces: Psychological Safety (Catalyst, 2015).

25 – Sylvia Ann Hewlett, Melinda Marshall, Laura Sherbin, and Tara Gonsalves, Innovation, Diversity, and Market Growth (Center for Talent Innovation, 2013).

26 – Muhammad Ali, Isabel Metz, and Carol T. Kulik, “Retaining a Diverse Workforce: The Impact of Gender-Focused Human Resource Management,” Human Resource Management Journal, vol. 25, no. 4 (2015): p. 580-599.

27 -Muhammad Ali, Isabel Metz, and Carol T. Kulik, “Retaining a Diverse Workforce: The Impact of Gender-Focused Human Resource Management,” Human Resource Management Journal, vol. 25, no. 4 (2015): p. 580-599.

OutBuro lgbtprofessilnal networking gay entrepreneurs lesbian business owners queer startups corporate equality rating business reviews

Why LGBT Networking with OutBüro Will Advance Your Career

Originally posted on DebtFreeGuys here on Aug 21, 2018.

Why your career must include LGBT networking

Though LinkedIn is a valuable professional networking tool, not all of us feel comfortable being ‘out’ in that setting. Glassdoor offers quality insight around what it’s like to work at specific companies, but it doesn’t share experience specific to LGBT employees. That’s why you need the LGBT networking site, OutBüro.

Learn more about the LGBT networking site, OutBüro:

Meet LGBT networking leader, Dennis Velco of OutBüro

Dennis Velco is the Founder and CEO of OutBüro, an LGBT networking site for entrepreneurs and professionals. The site allows users to network, submit resumes to a searchable database, and rate companies anonymously from an LGBT perspective. It also provides a forum where companies of any size can connect with LGBT candidates through active recruiting.

Dennis joins us to discuss the impetus for OutBüro, describing the platform as a safe space for LGBT job-seekers. He offers insight around joining an employee resource group at work OR creating one of your own and addresses the common disconnect between a company’s inclusive policies and how LGBT employees are actually treated in the workplace. Listen in for Dennis’ advice around promoting diversity and inclusion year-round and learn how you can reap the benefits of joining the OutBüro community!

Join Now - OutBuro LGBT Employer Reviews Rating Gay Professional Network Lesbian Business Networking Diversity Recruiting Jobs Company Queer Bisexual TransgenderTopics covered about LGBT networking

The impetus for OutBüro

  • LinkedIn and Glassdoor’s ‘little gay baby’
  • Safe space for LGBT job-seekers
  • Forum for companies looking for talent

The capabilities of the OutBüro site

  • Connect with mentors, VCs and join groups
  • Communicate without limitations
  • Submit resume to the searchable database
  • Rate companies anonymously
  • Users demonstrate expertise via blogging

The value of LGBT-friendly policies

  • Impact on quality of life, job satisfaction
  • Affects long-term earning potential
  • Policy doesn’t always reflect reality

How OutBüro is different from the HRC Corporate Equality Index

  • Includes any company of any size
  • Offers feedback loop from employees

Dennis’ advice around coming out at work

  • Individual choice (may not feel safe)
  • Join employee resource group
  • Create an informal network of peers

Dennis’ take on promoting inclusion in advertising all year long

  • Visibility leads to awareness, awareness leads to equality
  • Economic value informs how marketing dollars spent

Dennis’ insight around shifting focus away from sex and politics

  • Most oppressed usually most sexually outrageous
  • The tendency to act out under ultra-conservative administration
  • Need for leaders to rally community

Connect with Dennis of OutBüro

Resources for LGBT Networking and sites mentioned during the interview with Dennis

OutBuro where you belong lgbtq entrprenuers out gay business owers lesbian startups queer professionals employer ratings customer reviews bisexual transgender equality community 1