OutBuro Launches LGBTQ Virtual Career Fairs - LGBT Corporate Employer Branding Company Ratings Recruiters Job Search Seeking Reviews Monitoring

OutBüro Launches LGBTQ Virtual Career Fairs

We are super stoked! OutBüro launches virtual career fairs focused on helping LGBTQ professionals advance their careers with LGBTQ friendly employers who are committed to LGBTQ corporate equality. We currently have 12 virtual career fairs planned in the first half of 2020. Check them out.

Are you actively looking for an LGBTQ friendly employer or passively open to new career opportunities? The new OutBüro virtual career fairs are for you.

While reviewing technology partners to bring this exciting service to the LGBTQ community every single potential solution partner stated, “I’ve been in this industry a very long time and I have never heard of any other LGBTQ focused virtual career fair. This is the first”. Additionally in chatting with recruiters and human resource directors, so far they have made similar comments. Further, each one so far as stated they are excited about this new approach to finding great new talent who happen to be LGBTQ.

Create your professional profile on www.OutBuro.com today so that recruiters can find you, knowing they are seeking quality LGBTQ candidates!

The OutBüro virtual career fair platform is intuitive and mobile-friendly making it possible for you as the job seeker to even participate while on your lunch break. In addition to interacting with employer recruiters via text chat, the recruiters may invite you to a one-on-one video chat. So please be dressed appropriately – even if just from the waist up. LOL Be in a quiet setting without lots of distractions.

Job seekers check out:

12 Tips: Getting the Most Out of an OutBüro LGBTQ Virtual Career Fair

LGBTQ Corporate Equality Focused Employers Want to Hire You

Once you complete your virtual career fair profile, it will be usable in all future OutBüro virtual career fairs you participate in it. You may update your information at any time.

Employers, learn more about the OutBüro virtual career fairs focused on assisting your organization with its diversity and inclusion recruitment marketing to attract quality candidates who happen to identify as LGBTQ:

OutBüro’s mission is to connect the world’s LGBTQ employees, professionals, and entrepreneurs with opportunities to grow in their careers and grow their companies. We strive to connect companies and organizations that support LGBTQ Corporate Equality with quality candidates while providing a voice and insight into workplace culture and LGBT workplace issues.

Employers also check out:

Employers contact us to discuss your needs, targets and learn more about how we may collaborate to help you attract quality LGBTQ candidates.

Virtural Career Fair - Request a qoute as employer

Use this contact form to initiate a dialog and request a quote.
  • This is the total number of employees for the legal entity.
  • Each virtual career fair booth may have up to 3 assigned recruiters or hiring managers participate. Your quote will be based on this. Example: 5 recruiters would be 2 booths.. The fee is based on the number of booths.
LGBTQ Finance Virtual Career Fair March 12 2020 - OutBuro LGBT Corporate Equality Employer Branding Company Ratings Recruiters Job Search Seeking Reviews Monitoring

LGBTQ in Finance Virtual Career Fair – March 12th

Finance sector virtual career fair for LGBTQ professionals seeking LGBTQ inclusive employers. As part of our mission supporting LGBTQ professionals to connect with LGBTQ friendly employers who support LGBTQ corporate equality with a workplace that is inclusive and welcoming.

Job seekers: It is advised to establish your professional profile on OutBüro. Jobseeker online registration for each individual virtual career fair will begin 4 weeks prior to the event date. Put a reminder in your calendar to check back here for a link to the event registration page. In the meantime create your OutBüro professional profile today.

Employers: Employers interested in actively recruiting LGBTQ diversity candidates should contact OutBüro at a minimum of 6 weeks before the event date(s) to register. See Virtual Career Fairs – For Employers and Virtual Career Fairs – Steps for Employers. It t is advised that all employers claim or add their Employer Listing on OutBüro well in advance of each virtual career fair so that candidates may research your organization and see all the great policies, benefits, business practice and more you are doing for your LGBTQ employees, clients/customers and the community

Dates: March 12, 2020

Time: 9 am – 4 pm US Eastern Time Zone

Around 4 weeks prior to the even Job Seeker registration will begin and announced.

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3 Ways You Should Be Using OutBüro in Recruiting LGBT Candidates

With over a growing network reach of over 63 thousand gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer professionals, OutBüro is a huge resource that will assist you to attract and close top-tier diversity talent. Candidates utilize the website to research companies, compose and read testimonials, employer reviews/ratings, locate new job opportunities, and professional networking. As a company, efficiently managing your business’s existence on OutBüro will help you put your very best foot forward with those candidates validating your LGBT-friendly policies and work culture.

1. Showcase your company brand

When you add/claim your business listing you are able to:

  • Add/edit a business description featuring LGBT recruiting-centric content as much as possible
  • Photographs
  • Videos
  • Indicate the LGBT important policies in place
  • Indicate your diversity vendor practices
  • Invite all your current employees to review/rate you on OutBüro to reveal candidates exactly what it is like to work in your business
  • Add your OutBüro Company Review rating to your company HR home page with a link to it on OutBüro
  • Write press releases showcasing your OutBüro score and LGBT inclusive work environment
  • Publish content directly on the OutBüro blog – activities and employee spotlights for example
  • Directly network with OutBüro members and within our OutBüro on LinkedIn group
  • Potential to be featured in OutBüro member communications

Participating in the first and only Company Reviews/Ratings for the LGBT global community can enable you to magnify your quality candidate reach and acquisition.

2. Monitor and respond to reviews/rating feedback

OutBüro is a go-to website for LGBT employees to provide anonymous company reviews/ratings with both general work topics and LGBT related interests. Fifty-two percent of active job seekers browse employee testimonials at the onset of their job hunt before talking with a business recruiter or hiring manager.

Make it a point to track and react to reviews and opinions on interviews since they’re posted. Thank people for their time submitting a review, no matter if it is negative or positive overall, and handle any complaints noted. When some do raise a negative experience working at your company, it may be a legitimate opportunity to improve. Others might be an issue of culture match–so do everything you can to become responsive and transparent.

On average, 9 in 10 job seekers find company reviews useful when studying about a prospective new employer. Further, 70 percent state their feeling of a business is enhanced after viewing them positively respond to a negative review/rating critique. It demonstrates that the company is engaged and cares.

3. Post Jobs

When diversity LGBT candidates are exploring your company brand, make it simple for them to discover relevant job opportunities directly on OutBüro. Eighty-nine percent of OutBüro users are actively searching for new career opportunities or might be open to new opportunities if contacted. Since job seekers have likely researched the company prior to submitting their application, they are normally higher quality candidates than people from other job boards that are not focused on the LGBT working force and professional community.

OutBüro is a new site yet, founded on proven tactics to be an important instrument for applicants and, due to our focused growing member base, can be a rather valuable tool for companies like yours. Candidates utilize the website in order to investigate companies they are thinking about working at. Your active presence can go a long way in making the difference in attracting new talent and retaining your current employees, versus losing them to your rival.

 

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How to Hire the Right Employees for Your LGBT Owned Business

Your business has the best chance of success if you hire the right people to work for you. Skilled, enthusiastic, and flexible staff will help your business run and grow smoothly. But how do you hire the right employees?

Hiring is part of your job

As a business owner or founder, your vision for your company affects everything. It’s part of your job to find and hire employees who will share that vision and take your business forward.

Even if you intend to outsource to contractors and freelancers, this is still important. Whether you’re hiring a permanent staff member or trying to find someone to do short-term contract work for you, it pays to get the right person.

With a little thought and planning, you’ll be able to clearly determine your requirements, find candidates, and narrow down your choices. Eventually, you should find the right employee for the role you’re offering. Here are some useful tips to help you make that decision.

Plan your hiring strategy

This should be part of your business plan. Think about where you expect your business to be at various stages over the next year, and how many employees you’ll need in order to get there. For each new vacancy, consider the following points:

  • Prioritize what you or your team actually need
    Make lists of the tasks you want each new employee to take on.
  • Hire people with complementary skills
    Think about operational versus ideas people and sales skills versus creative ability.
  • Be clear about what you can afford
    Look into market rates and offer a suitably competitive salary within your budget.
  • Decide if you want a part-time or full-time employee
    There are pros and cons to both, so research this before deciding.
  • Is your business at the growth stage?
    Small, growing businesses can benefit from hiring flexible people able to take on multiple roles in the company.
  • Is experience important to you?
    Larger companies tend to require deeper, specific expertise and experience, though flexibility is still useful.

Small businesses have to budget carefully, which is why good quality cloud accounting software is so helpful. Use it to plan your budget and see if you can afford to hire someone new for a particular role. Balance the cost of employing them with the increased revenue they should bring to your business.

Consider your culture

Your company has a culture: a way of approaching business, a way of thinking and operating that’s unique. This affects the way your business operates and the way it’s seen by customers.

You, as a business owner or founder, have a big influence on your company’s culture, but so do the people you hire. So consider these points before you start hiring:

  • What is your company culture now?
    Ask your employees (perhaps anonymously) or customers how they view your business.
  • What do you want your culture to be?
    Think about successful companies and how they do business. Try to copy their good points.
  • Do you want to hire someone who will fit into your company culture?
    If your team is running smoothly you might want someone who will fit in perfectly.
  • Would you consider hiring someone who might challenge your company culture in a positive way?
    Group-think and confirmation bias can hold your business back. Someone who can challenge your business culture might get you out of a rut.
  • How will you define your culture in words when you’re recruiting?
    It can be difficult to explain your culture to someone new, so take the time to prepare.
  • How will you evaluate an individual’s suitability to your company culture?
    Think about the interview questions you might ask.

Good culture is more than just putting pool tables or a ‘relaxation zone’ in your business premises, especially if your employees are too stressed or overworked to use them! It involves helping your staff develop as individuals and also as part of their team.

Find candidates: Six recruitment agency alternatives

You could use a recruitment agency to try to find candidates for you. With their wide reach, they can locate people who might not otherwise hear about the role, but they usually charge quite a lot. For an important management-level position this might be worthwhile, but there are other options:

  1. Use your LinkedIn account
    Search for people in your location and field with the right skills. Update your profile to let people know you’re hiring.
  2. Talk to local business agencies
    Make sure you network socially in the real world. You may find yourself introduced to the ideal candidate.
  3. Add a We’re hiring! link to your website and email signatures
    Ensure it links to a page with up-to-date job vacancies and contact details.
  4. Advertise on job websites.
    These will charge, but usually not as much as recruitment agencies. You may receive some unsuitable applications from job-seekers taking the ‘scatter-gun’ approach, though.
  5. Ask your business partners and clients
    Tell them the type of person you’re looking for and see if they can refer anyone to you.
  6. Use your social media accounts to announce that you’re hiring
    The more places you advertise your requirements, the more likely you are to find candidates.

The amount you spend on advertising the role will depend on your budget. Keep track of costs in your accounting software, to make sure you don’t over-spend.

Make a short-list of applicants

Filtering applicants into a short-list can be time-consuming and requires a lot of thought. Look through each application and think about whether the person fits the criteria you’ve specified.

  • Consider their qualifications
    Are they relevant to the role? Are they up to date?
  • Look at their work experience
    Have they moved around a lot? That’s not necessarily a cause for concern but it might indicate potential problems.
  • What’s their background in your specific field?
    How much time have they spent working in environments that are similar to the role you’re offering? What relevant knowledge do they have?
  • Check their posts and behavior on social networks
    You’ll probably learn more about their background, maturity, and life skills. Don’t be too harsh here, because everyone needs to let off steam occasionally, but any recurring issues might need to be taken into account.

It’s also a good idea to check references before the interview stage, as it might save you time if something negative turns up.

Questions to ask when you interview candidates

Draw up a range of questions about each candidate’s career and skills. Include some open-ended questions so the candidates have the opportunity to talk about themselves and their goals. For example:

  • Ask them about their successes
    Encourage them to talk about their achievements, even those outside work. A well-rounded individual should be a useful addition to your team.
  • What do they think about your company?
    See if they’ve done their research about your business, as it’ll give you an idea of their commitment.
  • Enquire about hobbies and interests
    Employees with good work-life balance tend to be more productive and creative than those who are fixated on their careers. Find out what they read, what they watch, how they learn new skills.
  • Go for a walk with them
    Perhaps give them a tour of your premises or take them out for a coffee – and talk while you walk. You’ll get a better idea of their personality than you will in a formal interview environment.

Make sure you follow all legal requirements regarding privacy, discrimination, and fairness during the interview and recruitment process. Check local legislation to ensure you don’t make any costly mistakes.

What to look for so you can hire the right person

Hiring the wrong person can be expensive in terms of money and emotional stress, especially if you have to fire them soon afterward. So take the time to get it right. Some more things to consider include:

  • Personality
    Is this person going to fit into your existing team or will there be a personality clash? In a small business, this can be a critical issue.
  • Flexibility
    The ability to adapt to new and different tasks is a valuable skill.
  • Problem-solving ability
    Look for someone who uses logic and lateral thinking to overcome challenges.
  • Communication skills
    Knowledge is of little use unless it’s communicated. You need someone who’s approachable and easy to talk to.

As well as these points, try to hire someone who fits in with your strategy and core business values. And make sure it’s someone you can trust.

Above all, use your instincts

As a business owner, you sometimes have to go with what feels right, because that feeling is the reasoning of your unconscious mind.

The right person will almost certainly feel right to you, as well as ticking all the boxes for experience, qualifications, skills, and personality. If you have doubts about someone’s suitability to the role you’re offering, it’s probably best not to hire them.

Once you’ve hired the right people you can start to build them into a working team that will function efficiently and takes your business forward.

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How to Build a Great Team in Your LGBT Owned Business

Hiring the right employees is important but it’s not enough. For your business to succeed you’ll have to shape those employees into a winning team. Team building isn’t easy though, so how do you get everyone to work well together?

Understand the strengths of each individual

It’s likely that your new employees will have come from a variety of backgrounds. They’ll have different personalities and therefore different ideas about how to do their jobs. If you’re a manager, it’s important to recognize this because having a deep understanding of people is worth its weight in gold. If you can enable each employee to channel their strengths and shine in a way that benefits your business, then you’re on the right track.

Here are some tips on turning a group of individuals into a cohesive successful team that will help your business reach its full potential.

Explain your business vision

Start by setting the scene for your employees. Let them know what they’re aiming for and help them to understand the goals of your company.

  • Talk about the culture you want to build
    Plant the seeds of your business culture in your workers’ minds so it grows and flourishes. Get them excited about being part of the team and the environment.
  • Describe your future plans
    Create a vision of where your team should be, six months, a year, and two years from now. Use your accounting software to draw up realistic financial forecasts and share these with your employees.
  • Explain the environment of customers, prospects, and partners
    Use diagrams if necessary to show the interaction between all the people around your company.
  • Use ‘we’ instead of ‘I’ when talking about your business
    It’s a common startup mistake to associate yourself with your business, but if you want your employees to feel like part of a team then you’ll need to include them too.

These points will help your employees feel settled and give them a feeling for the situation in which they’re working. Once that’s done, you can start to bring out the best in them.

Get your employees involved

It’s important to quickly get your employees involved in the day-to-day running of your business. Keep them active and use their strengths to help them integrate and develop.

  • Give them tasks right away
    On the first day, your new employees should already be doing useful work. Get them engaged right from the start.
  • Challenge them
    Help your employees to push themselves. Use timelines or specific goals (with their input) for them to strive for.
  • Acknowledge their successes
    Use the carrot, not just the stick. Always reward success with praise.
  • Mentor your new hires
    Partner with your new employees with someone senior on the team. The more mentoring you do, the faster your team will take shape.

Explain to your employees that the more effort they put in, the quicker the company will grow, and the better their rewards will be. This could be in terms of promotion, salary and benefits.

Define roles clearly

Everyone needs to know their job – what’s expected of them and what’s not. If you don’t make this clear, the morale of your employees will suffer, and progress and efficiency will be affected.

For example, if one person is waiting for another to finish a task, but the other person doesn’t believe that task is part of their job description, progress will grind to a halt.

So be sure to update roles and task lists frequently. Then your employees will know what they’re supposed to be doing.

Consider team-building exercises

Small businesses are often fast-paced environments. That means you need to get your team working together quickly. Team-building exercises can help, but there are some important points to consider:

  • Budget carefully
    Days off work will cost you money in terms of lost productivity, plus the cost of the team-building event itself. Good accounting software will keep your accounts up to date, so you can see at a glance what you can afford.
  • Examine all the options
    Paintballing? Go-karting? Building log bridges over rivers? Ask your employees which options they might prefer, but be prepared for many different answers.
  • Don’t forget the simple things
    Something as low key as providing drinks and snacks for the last hour of a Friday afternoon might work well. Not everyone wants to crawl through the undergrowth in camouflage clothing.

Recognize the value of diversity

Complementary skill sets can mean contrasting personalities. For example (as a general rule only), salespeople tend to be extroverts while programmers and developers tend to be more introverted. That reflects the type of person drawn to each role and also the demands of the role itself.

Trying to ‘fix’ these differences so everyone’s the same will not work. In fact, it’s likely to backfire badly. At best you’ll annoy your employees, at worst you’ll breach diversity and equality legislation.

Accept that people are different from you – may be even very different. Race, gender, sexuality, and personality differences are irrelevant. What really matters is how good people are at their jobs.

Extend your team beyond your business

Think beyond the four walls of your business premises. Your team can be more than the people you hire directly. Make the most of your outside contacts:

  • Ask guest speakers to meet with your team 
    Talks on anything from organizational psychology to technical matters can help inform your team and improve their skills.
  • Share development ideas with customers and key business partners
    If you’re gearing up for major investment, make sure your customers and business partners are ready for it. Get your staff involved with these discussions.
  • Invite customers and key partners to staff meetings
    Give them the chance to provide feedback and take questions from your team. Do this carefully to avoid giving out confidential business information.
  • Have a team coach
    Consider using the services of someone who can provide real-time feedback on how your team is working together.

Getting an outside perspective can also help prevent ‘groupthink’, where employees become subdued and unwilling to challenge the norms of your business. Keep your staff thinking positively and creatively at all times.

Let your team know that you value them

This is important and quite straightforward. You simply have to take an interest in your staff.

  • Show them you care
    Learn about things like their family, personal life, or hobbies.
  • Focus on personal growth
    Think about enhancing your employees’ skill-sets and management skills. Know their career goals and help them get there.
  • Invest in your employees
    Give them the support and tools they need to be successful. This could include things like a healthy working environment, a supportive team, or the right software or technical equipment.
  • Celebrate the little victories!
    Reward every success, no matter how small it might seem. The goodwill generated will pay you back many times over.
  • Be positive and stay positive
    Don’t lose your cool or lose control, as that will set a bad impression and affect morale.

Identify problems early

You may have people who are having (or causing) problems in your organization. The reasons for this might include issues with their home life, financial problems, or other personal hardships.

In this situation, you must tread carefully and follow all local laws, especially those relating to privacy and employment rights. Seek professional advice if necessary.

Sometimes people just won’t fit into your culture, which is again why making the right employee choice is so important. Firing people should be a last resort if you’ve tried every other option including third-party mediation services and verbal and written warnings. Be sure to follow local legislation if you’re forced to take this option.

Understand negative team dynamics

There are other influences that can prevent a team from becoming successful. These include:

  • Unwillingness to change
    A fixed mindset, for example: “But we’ve always done it this way.”
  • Inability to work together
    Usually due to personality clashes. Resolving these is one of the hardest tasks for management.
  • Too many individual projects
    People who like to excel will feel unmotivated if they have to spread their abilities widely.
  • Too much individual recognition
    Favoring some team members above others will cause resentment.
  • Competing agendas
    If there’s a lack of consensus, productivity will drop.
  • Top-down talk and micro-management
    Saying “Do this, do that” is usually less effective than setting a goal and letting the team achieve it on their own.

Be aware of the potential for these problems to arise, and do what you can to prevent them.

Use your people skills to build your team

For your team to thrive you must be approachable, friendly, authoritative and responsible. In other words, a good manager and leader.

You may need training to help you become a better manager and there’s no shame in that. Running a business is a learning process – and just like your employees, you can learn and improve.

After all, the better you are at managing people, the better your team will perform and the faster your business will grow.

 
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