Working From Home Is the New Must-Have Benefit Employees Are Seeking - Prodoscore Research Confirms OutBuro lgbtq professional entreprenuer networking online community gay lesbian transgender queer

Working From Home Is the New Must-Have Benefit Employees Are Seeking, Prodoscore Research Confirms

A Hefty Majority Say Remote Work Makes Them Happier vs. Working in the Office

IRVINE, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–While business leaders debate the pros and cons of remote work, employees are clear: they want to hold on to their ability to work from home. According to a new third-party survey from Prodoscore, the leader in employee visibility and productivity intelligence software, the overwhelming majority of Americans (82.3%) are happier working remotely vs. working in the office.

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But there are challenges. One that looms large for remote workers is the “fear of missing out,” a consequence of not being physically present in the office, where employees can be seen working diligently by upper management. Nearly a third of Americans surveyed (32.7%) said they are experiencing paranoia due to working remotely. Of those that are feeling paranoid:

  • 71.5% said it has impacted their productivity at work
  • 48.8% said they think they’re missing out on important conversations
  • 48.8% said they feel like they’re replaceable
  • 40.1% said it’s due to the inability to understand tone through virtual messaging
  • 19.8% were concerned other employees were talking behind their (virtual) backs

“Survey after survey, ours included, confirms that at the very least employees want a hybrid work option,” said David Powell, President of Prodoscore, “We are faced with massive resignations and retirements. Millions of jobs are not getting filled. It is critical that we rethink how we define our workplaces, so that our employees are not paranoid, are able to be their most productive, and don’t want to quit.”

A Dedicated Home Workspace Makes All the Difference

Managers can foster productivity and a positive WFH experience by ensuring their teams have a designated, well-equipped home workspace.

Prodoscore’s research shows that nearly all remote workers (93%) believe having a dedicated home office makes WFH more enjoyable and boosts productivity. For many employees, this perception comes from firsthand knowledge: almost two-thirds (65.2%) of Americans surveyed who work from home have a designated home office.

Who’s going to bear the cost to equip the home office? Two-thirds of employees (66.4%) expect their employers to provide them with tools for success, whether that’s the necessary technology or the ergonomically correct chair and desk.

  • Expectations vary widely between generations. Those between the ages of 18 and 39 are more likely to expect their employer to outfit their workspace (77.5%), compared with Americans between 55 and 65 and above (48%).

Early in the remote worker phenomenon, there was speculation that employees would move to less expensive locales or even far-flung locations, given the opportunity. But that has not proved to be the case. Our research shows that remote workers are staying put, with only a small percentage (11.8%) moving out of the city where their office is located. Of those who moved, 44.8% reported it was somewhere with a lower cost of living.

The Younger the Children, the More Difficult WFH Becomes

Highlighting the critical need for a dedicated workspace is the reality that more than two-thirds of working parents (69.5%) had their children at home with them. The level of difficulty reported was directly proportional to the age of the respondent’s children.

  • Not surprisingly, the younger the age of the children, the harder WFH is for parents: nearly two-thirds (60%) of parents of children between newborn and 2 years say that having kids at home made it difficult to work remotely.
  • For employees between the ages of 25 and 39, more than half (58.9%) reported WFH with young children was challenging. This cohort had more children under the age of 12 than any other group.
  • Across generations, less than half ( 41% ) said it was difficult having a child at home while working remotely.

“This research demonstrates that while working from home is preferred over commuting to an office daily, it is not without its challenges,” Powell said. “For parents of young children, whether they work at home or on-site, the juggle remains intact. How can upper management help? One easy fix is to ensure that our employees have a well-designed workspace, as well as access to the tools to succeed. We need to make decisions based on the reality that our success as a company is dependent on employees’ happiness and productivity.”

Methodology

In September, Prodoscore and Propeller Insights polled more than 1,000 U.S. adults working full time across demographics about working from home, the importance of dedicated workspaces and some of the challenges they are facing.

About Prodoscore

Prodoscore™ is a company dedicated to empowering teams to be more effective and productive, validated with improved performance and enhanced contributions. By providing visibility into employee activities through a single, easy-to-understand productivity score, a “prodoscore” is calculated to improve workforce productivity and streamline the employee experience. Prodoscore works seamlessly with cloud tools like Google Workspace, Office365, CRM systems, and VoIP calling platforms, allowing it to be quickly implemented and maintained. Learn more at prodoscore.com.

Contacts

Nadine M. Sarraf | CMO, Prodoscore | 213.262.2551 | nadine@prodoscore.com
Alessandra Nagy | VP, Bospar PR | 714.310.4439 | alessandra@bospar.com

Americans Are Willing to Work Longer Hours to Continue Working from Home OutBuro lgbt professional entreprenuer networking online community gay lesbian transgender queer bisexual nonbinary

Americans Are Willing to Work Longer Hours to Continue Working from Home

While the Right Perks Can Drive Some Employees Back to the Office, Nearly 25% Won’t Go Back Under Any Circumstance

IRVINE, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Now that Americans have had a taste of working from home, many are reluctant to go back to the office full-time, according to a new third-party survey from Prodoscore, the leader in employee visibility and productivity intelligence software. The company today announced the results of its research, which assesses employees’ attitudes and willingness to return to a pre-pandemic workstyle environment.

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While many American business leaders are eager to hit the resume button and have their workplaces go “back to normal,” employees are more reluctant. A majority of Americans (75.6%) have returned or are expecting to return to the office full time, but nearly a third are unhappy about doing so. And, as evidenced by the Great Resignation, they are willing to put their job on the line to avoid the prospect: about a third of Americans (27.1%) reported they left their job or plan to rather than work full time in an office.

“The pandemic caused Americans to re-examine long held beliefs about the way we work,” said David Powell, President of Prodoscore. “We learned, for example, that we don’t have to be on site in a traditional office environment to keep the engine of commerce going. American employees have embraced the flexibility and work-life balance that working remotely delivers, and are looking to hold on to those benefits, even if they return to the office full time.”

Adapting to the Changing Workplace

The pre-pandemic, traditional workplace is no longer the dominant model in the American business environment. More Americans are working for a company that is implementing a hybrid work model (38.3%) than a traditional, full-time model (37.3%). Back in the office, employees are looking to bring elements of work from home with them. More than a third (39.2%) dress more casually in the office.

Employees Are Open to Change in Order to Work From Home

The survey shows that Americans are willing to make changes in exchange for working from home. Nearly 40% said they are comfortable with business leadership having visibility into their workday productivity; more than one-quarter (28.1%) will work longer workday hours; 16.% will take a pay cut; and 13.4% will forfeit company retirement contributions.

Working from Home Fosters a Work-Life Balance

Why the reluctance to go back to the office? Americans don’t want to give up the benefits of having work-life balance and the subsequent improvements in their physical and mental health – 43.6% said their physical health and 36.7% said their mental health have been impacted positively since working from home.

Perks Drive Willingness to Return to the Office

Under what circumstances would Americans return willingly to the office?

A majority of Americans would commit to working 100% in-office if it was a four-day work week, while more than a third would go back if they were given free lunches weekly or commute stipends. Nearly 30% said they would willingly return to the office if they had unlimited PTO. More Americans (19.6%) want a pet-friendly workplace than daycare available in the office or for free (16.3%).

But nearly a quarter of employees said there were no perks that would encourage them to work in the office full time – and there is absolutely nothing they miss about being in an office.

What Do Employees Miss About Office Life?

The lack of social interaction can’t be overlooked when discussing work from home scenarios. The one overriding element that employees miss the most when they’re not in the office full-time is their coworkers (48.2%). Spending time with co-workers is also their favorite part about being in an office. Nothing else comes close – not the snacks (5.4%) or free lunches (3.5%), not being away from the kids (6.2%), not having time to talk on the phone or listen to podcasts during the commute (2.8%).

“A distributed workforce, enabled by technology and productivity tools, is not the future – it is what is happening now,” said Powell. “As business leaders we need to get on board with this, to ensure that we are using the available tools to provide the flexibility our employees require and to facilitate – and then trust in – their ability to deliver at the highest performance levels, no matter where they are physically based. To attract and retain the best talent, this needs to be our charge.”

Methodology

In September, Prodoscore and Propeller Insights polled more than 1,000 U.S. adults working full time across demographics about their attitudes and willingness to return to the office full time, following the pandemic lockdown.

About Prodoscore

Prodoscore™ is a company dedicated to empowering teams to be more effective and productive, validated with improved performance and enhanced contributions. By providing visibility into employee activities through a single, easy-to-understand productivity score, a “prodoscore” is calculated to improve workforce productivity and streamline the employee experience. Prodoscore works seamlessly with cloud tools like Google Workspace, Office365, CRM systems, and VoIP calling platforms, allowing it to be quickly implemented and maintained. Learn more at prodoscore.com.

Contacts

Nadine M. Sarraf | CMO, Prodoscore | 213.262.2551 | nadine@prodoscore.com
Alessandra Nagy| VP, Bospar PR | 714.310.4439 | alessandra@bospar.com

Cities With More Remote-Friendly Jobs See Slower Office Market Recovery

Seattle, Boston and San Francisco have higher rates of remote-friendly jobs and office demand in those markets has recovered the least; Chicago, Los Angeles and New York have relatively fewer remote-friendly jobs and have had a more pronounced recovery, according to the June 2021 VTS Office Demand Index (VODI) monthly report

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–While COVID-19 cases are no longer an inhibitor of demand for office space, the pandemic has fundamentally changed the way we work, and the effects are being felt in the office leasing market. Markets with a greater percentage of remote-friendly jobs are recovering more slowly while the opposite is true for markets with fewer remote-friendly jobs.

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Some of that change is likely to persist in the interim, with more pronounced implications for cities that have a large share of remote-friendly jobs including Seattle, Boston and San Francisco, consistent with the picture emerging from the VTS Office Demand Index (VODI). The VODI tracks tenant tours, both in-person and virtual, of office properties across the nation, and is the earliest available indicator of upcoming office leases, as well as the only commercial real estate index to explicitly track tenant demand.

In Seattle, Boston, and San Francisco, the share of jobs that are remote-friendly is among the highest in the nation, and not coincidentally those markets have also recovered the least from their pre-pandemic level of demand, still down 39, 43 and 46 percent from their 2018-2019 average, respectively. In contrast, markets with a substantially lower share of remote-friendly jobs, Chicago, New York and Los Angeles, are only down 14 and 15 and 24 percent from their pre-pandemic values, respectively. The figures for remote-friendly job shares are drawn from a study by Apartment List which builds on prior academic work (Dingel & Neiman (2020).

Washington, D.C., an exception to the pattern with a high rate of remote-friendly jobs and a further-along recovery, has a large share of government employers who may be less willing to keep remote work arrangements in place compared to employers in Boston, San Francisco and Seattle.

“The pandemic didn’t just change the way we work, it changed the way we live. Many workers have found value in remote or hybrid work and may be reluctant to go back to the way life was pre-pandemic, said VTS CEO, Nick Romito. “In cities with higher rates of fully-remote jobs, hiring and retaining talent means employers will need to provide choices and flexibility – including fully-remote and fully in-office.”

VTS Office Demand Index (VODI)

 

National

BOS

CHI

LA

NYC

SEA

SF

DC

Share of Jobs that are Remote-Friendly

29%

38%

32%

31%

33%

39%

42%

42%

Pre-pandemic Benchmark* (avg. VODI in 2018-2019)

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

May 2021 VODI (current)

75

57

86

76

85

61

54

81

Current Difference from Pre-pandemic Benchmark (%)

-25%

-43%

-14%

-24%

-15%

-39%

-46%

-19%

Year-to-Year VODI Change

+60

+18

+68

+62

+80

+46

+51

+46

Year-over-Year VODI Change (%)**

400%

46.2%

377.8%

442.9%

1600%

306.7%

1700%

131.4%

Month-to-Month VODI Change

-7

-5

4

0

-12

-19

-10

-7

Month-over-Month VODI Change (%)

-8.5%

-8.1%

4.9%

0%

-12.4%

23.8%

15.6%

8%

*The level of the VODI is set so that its average during 2018-2019 equals 100. That level conveniently also serves as the pre-pandemic benchmark, as it reflects the typical level of office demand in the period preceding the pandemic.

**April 2020 was approximately the pandemic trough; exact timing varies by market.

Nationally, following a particularly sharp burst of recovery in early 2021, demand for office space took a breather in May. After rising 173 percent in the first four months of the year, demand for office space receded modestly in May, down 8.5 percent from April, but its level remains 5 times higher than the May 2020 pandemic low. The decline, likely fueled by a seasonal lull and an easing of pent-up demand, marks a reversion to office demand’s normal see-sawing behavior.

“Demand for office space tends to follow seasonal patterns; it should not be concerning that most markets saw demand for office space taper in May,” said VTS Chief Strategy Officer, Ryan Masiello. “Depending on the market, we anticipate that demand will continue to fluctuate this summer before rising again in August and September.”

As of May, more than half of the markets covered were within 25 percent of their pre-pandemic benchmark level–a level that more closely resembles pre-COVID-19 normalcy. All markets, with the exception of Chicago and Los Angeles, saw demand for office space recede in May with Seattle losing the most ground, down 24 percent during the month.

At a VODI of 86, Chicago, a market that has lagged behind all others on the march to recovery, is now the closest of all markets to its pre-pandemic level. Chicago is also the only market to see an increase in demand for office space in May, though the monthly increase has tapered from previous months. Demand for office space in Chicago is propped up by the need for physical space for a higher percentage of roles that are not classified as remote-friendly. In addition, the materialization of pent-up demand in Chicago may have been delayed a bit longer than elsewhere owing to the cold winter climate, which is now providing some extra tailwind in May.

Seattle also has a relatively high share of remote-friendly jobs, which is slowing its office demand recovery. In addition, Seattle was the only city covered by VODI to experience a drop in office-using employment in May. That said, office demand in Seattle has been volatile in the past, and the current decline is modest in comparison to the city’s office demand fluctuations in the years immediately preceding the pandemic.

About VTS

VTS is commercial real estate’s leading leasing, marketing and asset management platform where the industry comes to make deals happen and real-time data comes to life. The VTS Platform captures the largest first-party data source in the industry, which delivers real-time insights that fuel faster, more informed decision making and connections throughout the deal and asset lifecycle. VTS Data, the industry’s only forward-looking market dataset, and VTS Market and Marketplace, the industry’s first integrated online marketing solution, give landlords, brokers, and tenants unparalleled visibility into real-time market information and the direct connectivity to execute deals with greater speed and intelligence at every point in the planning, marketing, leasing, and asset management cycle.

More than 60% of Class A office space in the US and 12B square feet of office, retail, and industrial real estate globally is managed on the VTS platform. VTS’ user base includes over 45,000 CRE professionals including respected industry leaders like Blackstone, Brookfield Properties, LaSalle Investment Management, Hines, Boston Properties, Oxford Properties, JLL, and CBRE. To learn more about VTS, and to see our open roles, visit www.vts.com.

Contacts

Media:
Alison Paoli

Kingston Marketing Group

alison@kingstonmarketing.group

Elise Szwajkowski

Marino PR

eszwajkowski@marinopr.com

Eric Johnson

VTS

eric.johnson@vts.com