Terry Dyer Joins OutBuro as Partner and Chief Outreach Officer LGBTQ Corporate Equality Ratings workplace Reviews Gay Lesbian Employee strategic talent sourcing acquisition hiring employer branding

Terry Dyer Joins OutBüro as Partner & Chief Outreach Officer

OutBüro is pleased to announce the addition of Terry Dyer as Partner & Chief Outreach Officer effective August 24, 2020. Terry will be primarily taking lead on the expansion of our business through employer and organizational partnerships. Terry brings fifteen years of employer branding, talent acquisition management, recruitment strategy, diversity & inclusion, candidate experience, employee engagement, client services/relations, operations, and project/account management.  

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Terry Dyer: OutBüro Chief Outreach Officer

Please take a moment to reach out to Terry to congratulate him on his new role. Connect with him on OutBüro at https://www.outburo.com/profile/terrydyer/. His direct contact information is available via his OutBüro profile.

OutBüro’s CEO & Founder, Dennis Velco stated, “His professional skills, coupled with personal interests and accomplishments, made Terry a great fit for the OutBüro culture. Being a small and growing company it is important to not only have a skill match but also click personally. Terry is not only wicked smart and talented, but he has a dynamic engaging personality and is a natural relationship builder. I am looking forward to working together buildIng OutBüro and making a difference in the world while having fun along the way.”

OutBüro is built on empowering the LGBTQ entrepreneur, professional, and employer community through our dedicated platform, social channels, products, services, and events. With Terry’s expertise and contribution, we will continue to grow our offerings to better serve the community.   

Terry holds two Bachelor’s degrees, one in Communications with an emphasis in Public Relations and another in Vocal Performance. He played collegiate and high school sports and continues playing in the community. Recently, he added Best Selling published author to his accolades. 

OutBüro: where you belong

OutBüro focuses on, amplifies, features, and celebrates the professional and entrepreneurial side of life of persons who happen to identify as LGBTQ and welcoming for our amazing community allies and employers. 

It is an online community where every member may contribute, share, participate, connect, and engage with other industry professionals, LGBTQ welcoming employers, other entrepreneurs, identify, and build opportunities. It is the only LGBTQ corporate/employer rating/review site where employees create the Employer Rating. It is the only LGBTQ focused employer branding platform.  We are striving to be a go-to source of information, and resources to enable and empower LGBTQ entrepreneurs around the globe. We are striving to help employers of all sizes, engage, connect, attract, and retain top talent. We are striving to foster professional exposure and growth of LGBTQ professionals in all fields and in all phases of their careers. Is all that a tall task? Yes, it is. But together we can all rise. We can work together knowing there is ample for all and that our failures and mistakes are simply learning opportunities. That from those we gain wisdom and become a better version of ourselves.

OutBürois where you belong.

Join the growing movement at https://www.OutBuro.com

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14 Ways to Support LGBT Employees - Dennis Velco - OutBuro - Employee Engagement Satisfaction Talent Acquisition Recriuting Recruitment Marketing Job Seeker Canidate Attraction Profressional Community

14 Ways to Support LGBT Employees (2020)

Over the past 15 years or so, companies and organizations in all industries have moved towards embracing, supporting, and championing LGBTQ workplace equality. Focusing on creating a safe and welcoming workplace for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual, pansexual, heteroflexible, and questioning (LGBTQIA+) employees have many benefits beyond just being the right thing to do. Many studies have clearly demonstrated that companies that truly support diversity and inclusion as part of their corporate DNA thrive in many areas such as but limited to:

  • Innovation
  • Employee satisfaction and engagement
  • Increased employee retention
  • Higher qualified talent acquisition pool
  • Increased productivity
  • Improved team collaboration
  • Improved employee mental health
  • Reduction of absentee/sick days
  • Increased brand positive LGBTQ and ally perception
  • Client/customer satisfaction
  • Increase in financial performance
  • Shareholder value

So, supporting LGBTQIA+ employees is not just the right thing to do, it is good for business too. Here are some steps toward supporting your LGBT employees and attracting great talent candidates. Your LGBTQ employees and your clients/customers are tightly linked check out the LGBTQ Consumer and Employer Branding are Commingled article for more on that.

US Supreme Court Decision: Great Step But Still Work Remains

In July 2020, the US Supreme Court ruled that sexual orientation and gender identity are now covered under the US Equal Opportunity Employment Act for Non-Discrimination. That is cause for celebration, yet does not automatically transform all employers into workplaces that respect diversity, embrace inclusion, or have a work culture that is welcoming. In just the United States, based on other issues such as gender equality, racial equality, and sexual harassment, one can without much effort extrapolate that it may be decades before LGBT employees are fully and openly accepted in all workplaces, in all industries, and in all locations – if ever. We believe firmly in being the change and benefiting from it. Also, please keep in mind that in over 50% of the states in the US it is still legal to discriminate against LGBTQ persons in housing, finance, hate crime against LGBT persons is not criminalized, and many other issues that devalue and dehumanize the LGBT citizens. There is much work to do in the United States and countries around the world.

Your efforts to create a safe and welcoming workplace where all are treated equally with the same opportunities to contribute, grow and thrive are greatly appreciated.

Diversity, Inclusion & Welcoming

Diversity is about ensuring you have people of different backgrounds and experiences represented in the workplace. Inclusiveness takes it a step further by creating an environment where people’s differences of thought and experience are actually appreciated. Welcoming enables employees to be their authentic selves where their uniqueness may shine adding perspectives that are respected and potentially individually or collectively a business advantage.

A simple analogy is:

  • Diversity is being invited to a party.
  • Inclusive is while at the party, a cute person asks you to dance.
  • Welcoming is dancing like you have no cares in the world and no one is watching. Dang, check out those moves!
  • World-class is you inspire everyone to jump up to dance just as openly and boldly.
  • Everyone raves what an amazing party it is. Selfies are snapped and shared. It goes viral on social media. Your brand becomes the hottest epic party.

Ok, in this example eventually the neighbors may call the cops to shut the party down, but in business, it attracts top talent, employee satisfaction is high, employee retention is high, customer attraction and retention are high. You and your amazing team are crushing it.

So, how to get there?

1. Authenticity and Clear Mission

Being authentic in all aspects is critical. All too often we have heard of reports by employees that their employer launched a drive to obtain an LGBT Corporate Equality rating and once obtained management support nearly vanished and previous funding dissipated to a fraction. It makes the employees feel disenfranchised and like used pawns in the corporate goal to receive external publicity. Understand that true D&I can lead to great financial rewards, but if not deeply rooted in respect, value, and authenticity, you can do harm to your brand, employee morale, and customer perception. If issues arise it can leave a damaging scare that can take years to recover from, if ever. Don’t be that kind of organization. It is not necessary. As linked above, being authentic in supporting diversity and inclusion is proven to improve the company’s financial performance for many reasons. But why is a mission necessary? Because diversity alone does not necessarily mean there is the inclusion or a welcoming work culture. A clear mission will outline the objective and measurements. The LGBT community is very savvy so if striving to attract the LGBT customer market, they care about how you treat your LGBT employees and your authentic engagement in the community.

2. Top-level support

Ensure that LGBT employee support is a priority at the top senior management level. Have a top management staff person take the lead on LGBT employee inclusion. That person may not be LGBT themself, but an ally. This senior manager should be the LGBT employee resource group (ERG) executive sponsor. This person may be from any department. Indicate who your most senior-level employee who identifies as LGBT is on your OutBüro employer listing.

3. Take LGBT Reports of Discrimination and Harassment Seriously

Yes, in the United States it is now illegal to discriminate based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Is that enough? Do you feel that now covers you so there is no need for a company/organization non-discrimination policy based on sexual orientation or gender identity? If so, I bet your company/organization has policies covering gender, race, and religion. This is the same. I am also 99.9% sure you have a sexual harassment policy too, along with required annual training. This is no different. Your organization should have a strong non-discrimination policy in place, ensure it clearly states that it covers your recruitment and promotions. Create a communication plan to be sure all employees know what is not tolerated in the workplace. Not if, but when, homophobic bullying, discrimination, or harassment happens to acknowledge the validity of the concern raised, promptly follow procedures to investigate and take appropriate action. Ensure employees feel safe in making reports.

Have all reports reviewed by a team to reduce biases from even the HR staff. Do not assume that all human resources staff lack biases. Research and court case prove otherwise. Many discrimination lawsuits are based on the lack of action by the HR department. So take extra steps in training all HR staff and put teams in place with checks and balances instead of relying on just one gatekeeper. On your OutBüro employer listing link to your sexual orientation and gender identity non-discrimination policy. Make it easy for candidates to find it when researching you as a potential employer.

4. LGBT Employee Resource Group

Having an organized formal Employee Resource Group can go a long way in fostering an inclusive and welcoming work culture. It provides an opportunity to network and builds a sense of camaraderie. Many ERGs meet up during normal work hours to discuss work-related topics as well as off-hours social events to further the personal bonds that will translate into great working relationships. It is a great way to foster career development through mentoring. Encourage senior employees to mentor junior employees. If you support employee volunteering, the LGBT ERG could expand the organization’s LGBTQ community involvement by using their corporate volunteer hours in helping local LGBTQ charity nonprofit organizations and events. Encourage and support LGBT employees to participate in seminars and conferences. Encourage and support employees to participate in industry networking groups, LGBT professional associations, and to participate in content and groups on www.OutBuro.com – the LGBT professional and entrepreneur platform.

Having open and consistent dialogue with your LGBTQ employee resource group will improve employee engagement, company culture, and provide valuable information on ways to further innovate in the workplace. Create a company/Organization group on OutBüro where employees from around the globe can interact off company resources. Be an open group where prospective candidates may also join to connect with current employees, ask question, and get a great sense of you as an employer. Ask key ERG members to join the ERG Connections group on OutBüro. This is meant to be a Super Group for cross organization networking, sharing, learning and growing an LGBTQ ERG.

5. Support the Local LGBT Community

Show your support to the local LGBT community where you operate by providing information to employees about local events, groups, and resources. Sponsor a Pride Party, or even sponsor your LGBT ERG to participate in local Gay Pride events, have a corporate booth, use it for customer leads, and talent recruiting. Celebrate National Coming Out Day. Create a video series of employees sharing their stories of coming out personally and yet again professionally. Encourage volunteering at LGBT events throughout the year. Sponsor local organizations, from general support agencies, to those that provide needed services to the homeless, youth, seniors, persons living with compromised immune systems, students, and more. Sponsor local or national sporting leagues or teams. Sponsor the local gay men’s chorus or other cultural groups/events. Invite LGBT speakers to share their experiences with your team. There are also national and international organizations that support equality and human rights. The LGBT nonprofit sector operates on shoestring budgets and desperately could use your in-kind and financial support.

List and link to all the LGBTQ organizations and non-profits you support in whatever manner on your OutBüro Employer listing. So many companies do great things yet no one other than the benefiting organization has any clue. Show it. Tout it. It makes LGBT employees proud to work for you and it demonstrates to LGBT candidates, as well as customers, that you are involved in the community and therefore likely a super fantastic place to go to work or as a customer spend their money with.

6. Support LGBT Entrepreneurs

Sponsor the local LGBT chamber of commerce. Encourage LGBTQ employees to get involved to represent the company in the LGBTQ Chamber. If and where possible allow the employee to mentor small business owners. Sponsor LGBT founded startups – with funds, product/services discount or as in-kind sponsorship to help the small business grow. Add LGBT friendly procurement policies and actively seek products and services by LGBTQ owned businesses. Consider providing a workshop on how to do business with your company, the steps to becoming an approved small business vendor, if NGLCC certification is required or what other factors may help them secure a vendor agreement with you. The NGLCC has an LGBT certified business accreditation. That is great, but it is far from representing all LGBTQ business due to many factors. In your supplier diversity program certainly include NGLCC accredited LGBTQ suppliers, but be open to non-accredited ones too who as a startup not yet meet some of the accreditation requirements such as years in business with positive cash flow. Consider the merits of the business and found and advise them on how best to move forward.

List and link to all the organizations you support of LGBTQ owned business in whatever manner on your OutBüro Employer listing. So many companies do great things yet no one other than the benefiting organization has any clue. Show it. Tout it. It makes LGBT employees proud to work for you and it demonstrates to LGBT candidates that you are involved in the community and therefore likely a super fantastic place to go to work.

7. LGBT Inclusive Employee Surveys

On your periodic employee surveys allow the option for employees to anonymously identify as LGBTQ and ask specific questions regarding their experiences and feedback. Do not assume everyone will be open. Did you know that a recent study found that a whopping 29% of Americans under 30 years old identify as “heteroflexible”? So how you treat you open full out loud and proud LGBTQ employees has a much larger base than most assume and more than you will like ever truly exactly know.

8. LGBT Employer Rating/Reviews

Just like the employer reviews on Glassdoor.com, Indeed.com, Monster.com, and others, OutBüro (https://www.OutBuro.com) offers LGBTQ employees the ability to anonymously rate/review the current and recent past employers. Employers are strongly advised to claim their listing if already present or proactively add your employer listing. It is important to engage with reviews as you would on any other platform. It is advised to make all employees aware that you are participating in OutBüro. You may use the opportunity to reinforce your open and safe reporting policy while welcoming ratings/reviews on OutBüro. Such ratings/reviews can be a great source of insights as potential candidates seek information about you as an employer before applying. Check this article out: Company Reviews – Good for Companies and Their LGBTQ Employees

OutBüro logged in users may leave comments or questions on your OutBüro Employer listing or in groups. It is an opportunity to engage with potential candidates and customer. It should not be left ignored.

9. LGBTQ Competency Training

Having ongoing LGBTQ awareness training is important to fostering an inclusive and welcoming work environment. The content should be progressive and continual. If you don’t already, consider adding corporate notable figures and society historical figures to company communications regularly. It may feature persons who helped shape the company in the past or present. Feature diverse employees. The thing about LGBTQ employees is that unlike age, race, or gender, all, for the most part, are typically apparent. Being LGBTQ is not always as apparent and therefore if your culture is welcoming and the employee is okay with it, clearly state the employee’s LGBTQ identity along with all the great stuff they are doing within and for the company/organization.

This creates awareness as well as clearly demonstrates to all employees that the company/organization values the contributions of its employees including LGBTQ employees. Depending on the size of the company, I normally recommend featuring an employee once a week. Creating a video interview or video story is most ideal. For those features that are LGBTQ employees, you now have LGBTQ employer branding content. Share all via your YouTube channel. For LGBTQ features, add them to your OutBüro Employer listing too. This is a morale booster for other LGBTQ employees as well as a clear message that discrimination and/or harassment is not tolerated here. I recommend coupling this and/or other creative ideas with traditional training. It is a message however that reinforces the training provided and I consider it to be a micro lesson.

How about regular games that could become a tournament? Foster employee engagement activity where you can use an online quiz/survey tool to create a trivia knowledge game. Be creative and make it your own. Invite all staff to submit questions to be included. Heck, you might grow it into being quarter Family Feud like shows. Live Stream it to all offices, post on social media. Show what an inclusive, wicked smart team and fun culture you have. The point here is that LGBT biases, like others, are learned from a young age and deeply engrained. Creating new habits, and un-programing those deeply held biases take effort, energy, and but it can be fun and engaging.

Do you need help? We are happy to assist you and/or make recommendations to D&I consultant around the globe.

10. Offer LGBT-Friendly Benefits

For job seekers, today, inclusive benefits packages and non-discrimination clauses are some of the most important considerations when researching potential employers. In studies, it was found that having LGBTQ benefits also is important to young heterosexual job seekers. Overall job seekers want to feel they are working for an employer who is fair, socially, and environmentally responsible. Not being so can cost you in by reducing your chances of attracting top talent.

Be sure not to unintentionally exclude LGBTQ families and transgender individuals. Offer equal benefits to all employees, regardless of their sexual orientation, including parental leave, adoption leave, and time off to take care of dependants. Gendered language can cause parental benefits to unintentionally exclude LGBTQ families. Make your benefits inclusive of all employees by being conscious of what words you use in your coverage and favoring gender-neutral terms. it is the right thing to do for all employees as it is gender equality focused too. Today, in opposite-gender relationships, it is not uncommon for the male to be the child care provider while the female works.

  • Sexual orientation non-discrimination
  • Gender Identity non-discrimination
  • Domestic partner benefits
  • Transgender inclusive health benefits

11. Foster a Gender-Neutral Environment

Create a gender-neutral environment by making some simple changes such as establishing unisex toilets and using gender-neutral language, like ‘partner’ instead of husband or wife, and asking all employees to list their preferred pronouns on email sinatur blocks and employee directory listings.

12. Keep Track, Evaluate, & Improve

Celebrate your successes and monitor your progress by tracking things such as the number of employee grievances naturally with details of the type, persons involved, location, department, and such. No matter how small or outcome, track it. This could lead to identifying trends over time that need to be addressed. Of course, as in all employee training, track D&I training by course completed inclusive of LGBT competency training. If legally able track who is an out self-identified LGBTQ employee and when they publically came out. The more that comes out is a direct relation to the success of the organization in creating a safe and welcoming space. Tract ERG involvement likewise. If active participation falls or doesn’t attract employees to participate, why? Do they not feel safe? Is the ERG doing things that are attractive to employees? How does it compare with other company ERGs? Have you networked with other company LGBT ERG leaders with strong employee participation to gain insights on how to be effective?

13. Support Transgender Employees

As transgender visibility within the LGBTQ community has increased over the past few years, it has become clear that transgender people face a unique set of experiences and challenges. Learn what steps to take after an employee comes out as transgender to create a supportive and encouraging environment. Human Resource is an important player in assisting transgender employees during the complex and lengthy process of transitioning. We recommend special training from trainers who are themselves, transgender. We are happy to connect your organization with outstanding transgender coaches.

14. Post your own LGBT focused company and employee content

Increase your employer brand awareness with LGBTQ professionals. With an OutBüro Employer Listing subscription, the organization may post content directly to our blog as an author. We’d strongly recommend the content be LGBT professional life-related in some way. Perhaps it’s articles about what local, regional or national LGBT related events the organization has sponsored. Or maybe articles and videos featuring LGBT employees or customers. The article will list the authorized person/person as the author in an author bio box that will link all other past submissions posted.

If there have been negative reviews/ratings, an article might address what the organization is doing or has done to improve. It’s also a great way to feature what activities and such the organization’s LGBTQ employee resource group is doing on a monthly or quarterly basis. So many possibilities for your organization to be proactive. Some of this may be in the form of press releases. All submissions will be reviewed for approval before going live to ensure it’s appropriate for our audience and in line with the goals of OutBüro.

15. Bonus Tip – Strategic Talent Acquition: Recruiting LGBTQ Candidates

This topic has been mentioned in numerous articles here on OutBüro. It is a topic that wide and deep thus we have dedicated a full article to it. Please refer to the Strategic Talent Acquisition: Recruiting LGBTQ Candidates article for more. Will link once completed later this week.

Be sure to check out these additional resources and search OutBüro for other related topics of interest to you. Please place questions and desired article/video suggestions in the comments. We are happy to add suggested topics to our content calendar that fit our broad focus. You are also welcome to post via the activity stream, articles, and more. This is your community. Jump in.

Conclusion

OutBüro is a growing valuable tool for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer professionals for networking and as passive or active job seekers. OutBüro is here to help you to demonstrate all the great things you do to support your LGBTQ employees and attract LGBT talent as candidates to join your team.

Heterofexible - 29% of Young Americans Say They Are Not 100% Heterosexual - LGBT Employees Rate Employer Review Company Employee Branding OutBuro - Corporate Workplace Equality Gay Lesbian Queer Diversity Inclusion

Heterofexible – 29% of Young Americans Say They Are Not 100% Heterosexual

29% of under-30s Americans consider themselves as something other than exclusively heterosexual on the seven-point ‘Kinsey Scale’

Invented by Alfred Kinsey in the 1940s, the Kinsey scale plots individuals on a range of sexual dispositions from exclusively heterosexual at 0 through to exclusively homosexual at 6. YouGov conducted a study poll of American about their sexuality as a following on from a similar study in the UK.

  • 78% of Americans say that they are completely heterosexual while 4% say that they are completely homosexual
  • 16% of American adults say that they fall somewhere in between. In this group, the bulk (10%) say that they are more heterosexual than homosexual
  • 3% put themselves in the middle and another 3% say that they are predominantly homosexual.
  • 24% of people aged 30 to 44 say that they’re somewhere on the scale of bisexuality, compared to 8% or less of over-45s.
  • 2% of heterosexual American adults say that they have had a sexual experience with someone of the same sex.
  • A large number of Americans who classify themselves as heterosexual still admit to having had same-sex experiences.  Heterosexual identifying women (15%) are almost twice as likely as men (8%) to say that they have had a sexual encounter with someone of the same sex – at least admit it.
  • Younger Americans are noticeably less likely than their elders to put themselves in a firm category and identify as “heteroflexible”.
  • 80% of all Americans say that they are completely heterosexual or homosexual only 66% of under-30s say the same. 29% of under-30s put themselves somewhere on the category of bisexuality or heteroflexible.
  • The poll study found that the older someone is the less likely they are to say that they have fluid sexual attractions.

Full poll results can be found here and topline results and margin of error here.

A similar study in the UK found that young Britons were even more likely to be sexually flexible than young Americans. Nearly half of Britons under the age of 25 say that they are some level of bisexual.

Why does this matter here at OutBüro?  Because of employment discrimination against people who do not display perceived heteronormative qualities – Study finds LGBT people less likely to be hired, paid less, and not promoted

Check out these additional resource articles:

Knowing that the younger up and coming workforce self-identify as heteroflexible should indicate a strong need for companies of all sizes to put forth a considerable effort in the diversity, inclusion, and welcoming work culture.

Check out the below article for more information:


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Research Finds Females Favor Hiring Gay and Lesbian Job Seekers

Women are somewhat more inclined to hire gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer job candidates when compared to equally-qualified heterosexual applicants, according to a study headed by the University of Sussex. However, the contrary is true when the recruiter is a male. All else being equal, male recruiters and hiring managers judge perceived heterosexual applicants as more desirable to hire.

One would assume that a recruiter and hiring manager with more experience would not demonstrate prejudice bias. Surprisingly, this prejudice was stronger among people who had considerable experience of assessing resumes/ CVs.

Female recruiters scored homosexual candidates an average of 5.21 and heterosexual candidates 4.8.  Whereas males scored homosexual candidates 4.6 and heterosexual candidates 4.93.

The analysis in the Journal of Business and Psychology is the first to spot a favorable bias for gay and lesbian applicants in the hiring process. This manifests when only females are making the hiring decisions and are the make up the majority of the hiring process from initial resume scanning, through interviews and offers of employment. Since an all-female hiring panel is not common the LGBT job seeker remains at a huge disadvantage based on learned bias. Hiring panels made by groups of both women and men could result in less biased conclusions.

Dr. Ben Everly of Sussex’s School of Business, Management, and Economics, “These results reveal that prejudice against gay men and lesbians is considerably more nuanced than previous work indicates.”

Also, these outcomes can impact if and how gay men and lesbians reveal their homosexual identities on the job.  This can make many feel the need to be in the closet at work.

Across two experiments, around 400 people were randomly shown one of four resumes/CVs: that of a lesbian, a gay male, a straight female or a straight male. The resumes presented where identical in all details, such as professional expertise. The only differences were if it indicated a male or female indicated through the name – Greg Johnson (man) or Jennifer Lewis (female) and secondly for each gender it listed belonging to a professional association. Those were the Los Angeles Gay Business Professionals (LGBT applicants) or Los Angeles Business Professionals (straight applicants). Note there was only one-word difference in those organizations – Gay. During post-experiment screening, some participants that wrongly identified that a candidate’s sexual orientation had been taken out of the research.

The analysis also found signs that women perceived the gay and lesbians applicants to be warm and competent, which these factors affected their hiring choices.

Males, however, considered heterosexual candidates as more capable, which influenced their hiring choices, but revealed no difference in perceived warmth between the four candidates.

Check out our article these articles:

Source: Journal of Business and Psychology

The Journal of Business and Psychology (JBP) is an international outlet for publishing high-quality research designed to advance organizational science and practice. Since its inception in 1986, the journal has published impactful scholarship in Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Organizational Behavior, Human Resources Management, Work Psychology, Occupational Psychology, and Vocational Psychology. http://www.springer.com/psychology/personality+%26+social+psychology/journal/10869

OutBuro - 15 Ways to Improve Diversity LGBT Candidate Cultivation - LGBT Employer Company Reviews Directory GLBT Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Queer Professional Community Job Portal Board

15 Ways to Improve Diversity LGBT Candidate Cultivation

Your talent acquisition group works hard to develop LGBT candidate pipelines for all your company’s job roles. Trying to identify gay, lesbian, transgender, bisexual, queer candidates on traditional job boards is difficult. On your own company job board candidates don’t always self-identify as LGBTQ due to past recruiting and employment issues including discrimination. You need to be out loud and proactive to attract quality LGBTQ diversity and inclusion candidates.

Diversity hiring is the most embraced recruiting trend with 78 percent of talent acquisition leaders responding that they are tackling hiring diverse talent, head on. Why? Well, 78% of companies indicated they are prioritizing diversity to improve culture, and 62% are doing so to boost financial performance.*

The LGBTQ population crosses all other demographics. Therefore a strong LGBTQ talent cultivation effort will also yield candidates fitting other top diversity categories as well. LGBTQ people all ages, all genders, all races, all ethnic backgrounds, practice all religions, in all socioeconomic category, all branches of armed services, and all levels of abilities and disabilities. One might conclude that putting forth a concentrated effort on LGBTQ recruiting can ensure you meet all your diversity recruiting goals and targets.

Biggest barriers to diversity recruiting

  • 38% of responding recruiters stated that finding diversity candidates is their toughest job.*
  • 27% stated retaining their diversity employees is a huge problem. *
  • 14% stated their biggest barrier is getting diversity applicants through the interview process.*
  • 8% indicated they have a problem getting diversity candidates to accept their offer of employment.*
  • Only 14% indicated none of these issues apply to them.*

Think about your company. How, if and where do these apply to you? What internally can be done to improve?

42% of diversity recruiting fails due to the bias of the interviewer.* Ensure all persons involved in the interview process are trained and aligned with the company mission of diversity, inclusion, and belonging.

LGBT candidates want to hear from you

40-45% of potential candidates are extremely to very interested in hearing from prospecting recruiters with another 30% somewhat interested.* That is 70-75% who are very receptive to hearing from diversity recruiters seeking to fill positions.

70% of candidates are passive and 30% active. This means that diversity recruiters must find LGBT candidates who are not actively looking for another job at this time. Talent goes online to explore new opportunities with 60% using job boards (76% of those are satisfied in their current role), 56% leveraging social networks, and 50% utilizing word of mouth. OutBüro fills all three of these areas with a focus on LGBT professionals.*

Making the calls and getting it right

The very last thing you want is to lose the very best candidates due to bad processes and interactions. You just might if your gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer candidates have a bad interview experience.

No matter how well you well you pitch your open job during a phone interview, most are still unsure about the job and company until the interview. Getting the interview right win will over top talent and getting it wrong can severely hurt your recruiting effort.

83% of applicants say a negative interview experience can change their mind about a job or company they once liked. While 87% of applicants say a positive interview experience and sway them about a job or company.* Those are huge numbers that you cannot afford to ignore.

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Steps to attracting quality LGBTQ diversity candidates:

  1. Leverage the OutBüro’s Job Portal with a growing database of active and passive LGBTQ candidates.
  2. Enhance your company’s reputation in the LGBTQ community by inviting your current and recent past employees to rate/review your company on OutBüro’s Company Reviews. If your company is currently present simply claim it, and if not you may add it and claim it in one process. OutBüro’s Company Reviews are for any company or organization of any size and in any location globally. Complete your company profile including the required responses if your company as the following policies and practices in place:
    1. Sexual orientation non-discrimination policy
    2. Gender identity non-discrimination
    3. Domestic partner benefits
    4. Supports LGBTQ equality globally (if it operates in more than one country)
    5. LGBT inclusion competency
    6. Public commitment to LGBTQ equality (Tip: participating on OutBüro is one way to demonstrate this)
    7. Requires similar policies for contractors and vendors
  3. Get involved in OutBüro’s online community by connecting directly with professionals and creating relationships to woo the passive candidate
  4. Create a Group in OutBüro’s related to your company brand, industry, product, services or other topics of interest that can demonstrate your leadership in the space. Be the first on industry topic so that your competitors will forever wish they took that position of authority first and had all the privileges that come with being a group admin/owner such as being able to directly communicate with all group members even if not connects one to one.
  5. Post articles via your profile that will become part of OutBüro’s blogs and be distributed in its weekly new blog update email to all site members. Available to premium members accessed from your profile main menu under “Articles”.
  6. Join OutBüro’s LinkedIn Group – the largest LGBT professional networking group on LinkedIn.
  7. During the initial call, communicate the job requirements inquiring if it might be a good fit for the candidate.
  8. If yes, then continue to describe your company and include your diversity culture with every candidate. Include a quick rundown of the above-mentioned policies if you have them. If you do not have ones mentioned you might strongly consider being clear about that too. It will inform those that fit a diversity category and for those that don’t, it will convey the company policies and culture. Even if someone it’s a diversity candidate it’s important they know from the outset what kind of culture you have and striving to support.
  9. If things continue to go well, be sure to review the interview process. If a candidate is to come to your location be sure to include detailed instructions on access to the location such as if there are security checkpoints to go through. Your interview staff does not communicate significant logistics to applicants.
  10. Follow up with an email confirming the time, location, and logistics. It seems apparent to assume to bring multiple hard copies of their resume, but still, include that in your follow up email so it clear.
  1. On the phone and in this email describe who the applicant will be meeting with. Not being clear about the logistics can be stressful for applicants which and lead them to appear flustered or annoyed during an interview. Being clear and upfront creates an easy experience for all.
  2. Ensure people on your interview team know how to interview in a structured manner to ensure consistency from an applicant to applicant. Bear in mind, interviewing does not come naturally to everybody. Strong cooperation between your HR staff and the hiring staff can alleviate these difficulties. Hold an interviewer training to examine the way to evaluate and participate talent, such as what to not. Your team’s recruitment experience, along with your hiring team’s domain experience, will cause a much better interview experience for everybody. Also, ensure everyone understands the company’s diversity, inclusion and belonging mission since 43% of diversity recruiting fails due to interviewer bias.*
  3. Ensure your interview team is prepared. They know the process and schedule including requirements to follow up with candidate feedback in a timely manner. Boost efficiency and cooperation by sending an interview prep checklist to all important stakeholders. This can help them know what they can do to prepare for interviews so that they leave a favorable impression on the candidates. Remember that the candidate is interviewing the company as much as the company is interviewing the candidate.
  4. Provide the candidate feedback in a timely manner. On several occasions recently I have had friends tell me they received an offer from companies they interviewed with 3-4 months prior. In the meantime, they heard nothing and moved on to other opportunities. The companies on each occasion missed out on great talent. In the process, the company reputation within that circle of friends has been tarnished. Leaving your applicants hanging may turn a fantastic interview encounter sour. Do not let this happen. Collect and discuss interview comments as swiftly as possible to ensure all candidates understand where they stand. Be timely.
  5. Review all touch points you have both internally and with your candidates. Ask for honest constructive feedback to improve, from candidates that didn’t cut the mustard. Be open to new ideas. Seek to be ever evolving to be more inclusive as well as improving your processes. Candidate polls can be an excellent source of advice, as can article comments – such as the articles you submit on the OutBüro blog via your profile – Submit Articles.

Data source:

* – 2018 LinkedIn Talent Trends Report

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How to Hire the Right Employees for Your LGBT Owned Business

Your business has the best chance of success if you hire the right people to work for you. Skilled, enthusiastic, and flexible staff will help your business run and grow smoothly. But how do you hire the right employees?

Hiring is part of your job

As a business owner or founder, your vision for your company affects everything. It’s part of your job to find and hire employees who will share that vision and take your business forward.

Even if you intend to outsource to contractors and freelancers, this is still important. Whether you’re hiring a permanent staff member or trying to find someone to do short-term contract work for you, it pays to get the right person.

With a little thought and planning, you’ll be able to clearly determine your requirements, find candidates, and narrow down your choices. Eventually, you should find the right employee for the role you’re offering. Here are some useful tips to help you make that decision.

Plan your hiring strategy

This should be part of your business plan. Think about where you expect your business to be at various stages over the next year, and how many employees you’ll need in order to get there. For each new vacancy, consider the following points:

  • Prioritize what you or your team actually need
    Make lists of the tasks you want each new employee to take on.
  • Hire people with complementary skills
    Think about operational versus ideas people and sales skills versus creative ability.
  • Be clear about what you can afford
    Look into market rates and offer a suitably competitive salary within your budget.
  • Decide if you want a part-time or full-time employee
    There are pros and cons to both, so research this before deciding.
  • Is your business at the growth stage?
    Small, growing businesses can benefit from hiring flexible people able to take on multiple roles in the company.
  • Is experience important to you?
    Larger companies tend to require deeper, specific expertise and experience, though flexibility is still useful.

Small businesses have to budget carefully, which is why good quality cloud accounting software is so helpful. Use it to plan your budget and see if you can afford to hire someone new for a particular role. Balance the cost of employing them with the increased revenue they should bring to your business.

Consider your culture

Your company has a culture: a way of approaching business, a way of thinking and operating that’s unique. This affects the way your business operates and the way it’s seen by customers.

You, as a business owner or founder, have a big influence on your company’s culture, but so do the people you hire. So consider these points before you start hiring:

  • What is your company culture now?
    Ask your employees (perhaps anonymously) or customers how they view your business.
  • What do you want your culture to be?
    Think about successful companies and how they do business. Try to copy their good points.
  • Do you want to hire someone who will fit into your company culture?
    If your team is running smoothly you might want someone who will fit in perfectly.
  • Would you consider hiring someone who might challenge your company culture in a positive way?
    Group-think and confirmation bias can hold your business back. Someone who can challenge your business culture might get you out of a rut.
  • How will you define your culture in words when you’re recruiting?
    It can be difficult to explain your culture to someone new, so take the time to prepare.
  • How will you evaluate an individual’s suitability to your company culture?
    Think about the interview questions you might ask.

Good culture is more than just putting pool tables or a ‘relaxation zone’ in your business premises, especially if your employees are too stressed or overworked to use them! It involves helping your staff develop as individuals and also as part of their team.

Find candidates: Six recruitment agency alternatives

You could use a recruitment agency to try to find candidates for you. With their wide reach, they can locate people who might not otherwise hear about the role, but they usually charge quite a lot. For an important management-level position this might be worthwhile, but there are other options:

  1. Use your LinkedIn account
    Search for people in your location and field with the right skills. Update your profile to let people know you’re hiring.
  2. Talk to local business agencies
    Make sure you network socially in the real world. You may find yourself introduced to the ideal candidate.
  3. Add a We’re hiring! link to your website and email signatures
    Ensure it links to a page with up-to-date job vacancies and contact details.
  4. Advertise on job websites.
    These will charge, but usually not as much as recruitment agencies. You may receive some unsuitable applications from job-seekers taking the ‘scatter-gun’ approach, though.
  5. Ask your business partners and clients
    Tell them the type of person you’re looking for and see if they can refer anyone to you.
  6. Use your social media accounts to announce that you’re hiring
    The more places you advertise your requirements, the more likely you are to find candidates.

The amount you spend on advertising the role will depend on your budget. Keep track of costs in your accounting software, to make sure you don’t over-spend.

Make a short-list of applicants

Filtering applicants into a short-list can be time-consuming and requires a lot of thought. Look through each application and think about whether the person fits the criteria you’ve specified.

  • Consider their qualifications
    Are they relevant to the role? Are they up to date?
  • Look at their work experience
    Have they moved around a lot? That’s not necessarily a cause for concern but it might indicate potential problems.
  • What’s their background in your specific field?
    How much time have they spent working in environments that are similar to the role you’re offering? What relevant knowledge do they have?
  • Check their posts and behavior on social networks
    You’ll probably learn more about their background, maturity, and life skills. Don’t be too harsh here, because everyone needs to let off steam occasionally, but any recurring issues might need to be taken into account.

It’s also a good idea to check references before the interview stage, as it might save you time if something negative turns up.

Questions to ask when you interview candidates

Draw up a range of questions about each candidate’s career and skills. Include some open-ended questions so the candidates have the opportunity to talk about themselves and their goals. For example:

  • Ask them about their successes
    Encourage them to talk about their achievements, even those outside work. A well-rounded individual should be a useful addition to your team.
  • What do they think about your company?
    See if they’ve done their research about your business, as it’ll give you an idea of their commitment.
  • Enquire about hobbies and interests
    Employees with good work-life balance tend to be more productive and creative than those who are fixated on their careers. Find out what they read, what they watch, how they learn new skills.
  • Go for a walk with them
    Perhaps give them a tour of your premises or take them out for a coffee – and talk while you walk. You’ll get a better idea of their personality than you will in a formal interview environment.

Make sure you follow all legal requirements regarding privacy, discrimination, and fairness during the interview and recruitment process. Check local legislation to ensure you don’t make any costly mistakes.

What to look for so you can hire the right person

Hiring the wrong person can be expensive in terms of money and emotional stress, especially if you have to fire them soon afterward. So take the time to get it right. Some more things to consider include:

  • Personality
    Is this person going to fit into your existing team or will there be a personality clash? In a small business, this can be a critical issue.
  • Flexibility
    The ability to adapt to new and different tasks is a valuable skill.
  • Problem-solving ability
    Look for someone who uses logic and lateral thinking to overcome challenges.
  • Communication skills
    Knowledge is of little use unless it’s communicated. You need someone who’s approachable and easy to talk to.

As well as these points, try to hire someone who fits in with your strategy and core business values. And make sure it’s someone you can trust.

Above all, use your instincts

As a business owner, you sometimes have to go with what feels right, because that feeling is the reasoning of your unconscious mind.

The right person will almost certainly feel right to you, as well as ticking all the boxes for experience, qualifications, skills, and personality. If you have doubts about someone’s suitability to the role you’re offering, it’s probably best not to hire them.

Once you’ve hired the right people you can start to build them into a working team that will function efficiently and takes your business forward.

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How to Build a Great Team in Your LGBT Owned Business

Hiring the right employees is important but it’s not enough. For your business to succeed you’ll have to shape those employees into a winning team. Team building isn’t easy though, so how do you get everyone to work well together?

Understand the strengths of each individual

It’s likely that your new employees will have come from a variety of backgrounds. They’ll have different personalities and therefore different ideas about how to do their jobs. If you’re a manager, it’s important to recognize this because having a deep understanding of people is worth its weight in gold. If you can enable each employee to channel their strengths and shine in a way that benefits your business, then you’re on the right track.

Here are some tips on turning a group of individuals into a cohesive successful team that will help your business reach its full potential.

Explain your business vision

Start by setting the scene for your employees. Let them know what they’re aiming for and help them to understand the goals of your company.

  • Talk about the culture you want to build
    Plant the seeds of your business culture in your workers’ minds so it grows and flourishes. Get them excited about being part of the team and the environment.
  • Describe your future plans
    Create a vision of where your team should be, six months, a year, and two years from now. Use your accounting software to draw up realistic financial forecasts and share these with your employees.
  • Explain the environment of customers, prospects, and partners
    Use diagrams if necessary to show the interaction between all the people around your company.
  • Use ‘we’ instead of ‘I’ when talking about your business
    It’s a common startup mistake to associate yourself with your business, but if you want your employees to feel like part of a team then you’ll need to include them too.

These points will help your employees feel settled and give them a feeling for the situation in which they’re working. Once that’s done, you can start to bring out the best in them.

Get your employees involved

It’s important to quickly get your employees involved in the day-to-day running of your business. Keep them active and use their strengths to help them integrate and develop.

  • Give them tasks right away
    On the first day, your new employees should already be doing useful work. Get them engaged right from the start.
  • Challenge them
    Help your employees to push themselves. Use timelines or specific goals (with their input) for them to strive for.
  • Acknowledge their successes
    Use the carrot, not just the stick. Always reward success with praise.
  • Mentor your new hires
    Partner with your new employees with someone senior on the team. The more mentoring you do, the faster your team will take shape.

Explain to your employees that the more effort they put in, the quicker the company will grow, and the better their rewards will be. This could be in terms of promotion, salary and benefits.

Define roles clearly

Everyone needs to know their job – what’s expected of them and what’s not. If you don’t make this clear, the morale of your employees will suffer, and progress and efficiency will be affected.

For example, if one person is waiting for another to finish a task, but the other person doesn’t believe that task is part of their job description, progress will grind to a halt.

So be sure to update roles and task lists frequently. Then your employees will know what they’re supposed to be doing.

Consider team-building exercises

Small businesses are often fast-paced environments. That means you need to get your team working together quickly. Team-building exercises can help, but there are some important points to consider:

  • Budget carefully
    Days off work will cost you money in terms of lost productivity, plus the cost of the team-building event itself. Good accounting software will keep your accounts up to date, so you can see at a glance what you can afford.
  • Examine all the options
    Paintballing? Go-karting? Building log bridges over rivers? Ask your employees which options they might prefer, but be prepared for many different answers.
  • Don’t forget the simple things
    Something as low key as providing drinks and snacks for the last hour of a Friday afternoon might work well. Not everyone wants to crawl through the undergrowth in camouflage clothing.

Recognize the value of diversity

Complementary skill sets can mean contrasting personalities. For example (as a general rule only), salespeople tend to be extroverts while programmers and developers tend to be more introverted. That reflects the type of person drawn to each role and also the demands of the role itself.

Trying to ‘fix’ these differences so everyone’s the same will not work. In fact, it’s likely to backfire badly. At best you’ll annoy your employees, at worst you’ll breach diversity and equality legislation.

Accept that people are different from you – may be even very different. Race, gender, sexuality, and personality differences are irrelevant. What really matters is how good people are at their jobs.

Extend your team beyond your business

Think beyond the four walls of your business premises. Your team can be more than the people you hire directly. Make the most of your outside contacts:

  • Ask guest speakers to meet with your team 
    Talks on anything from organizational psychology to technical matters can help inform your team and improve their skills.
  • Share development ideas with customers and key business partners
    If you’re gearing up for major investment, make sure your customers and business partners are ready for it. Get your staff involved with these discussions.
  • Invite customers and key partners to staff meetings
    Give them the chance to provide feedback and take questions from your team. Do this carefully to avoid giving out confidential business information.
  • Have a team coach
    Consider using the services of someone who can provide real-time feedback on how your team is working together.

Getting an outside perspective can also help prevent ‘groupthink’, where employees become subdued and unwilling to challenge the norms of your business. Keep your staff thinking positively and creatively at all times.

Let your team know that you value them

This is important and quite straightforward. You simply have to take an interest in your staff.

  • Show them you care
    Learn about things like their family, personal life, or hobbies.
  • Focus on personal growth
    Think about enhancing your employees’ skill-sets and management skills. Know their career goals and help them get there.
  • Invest in your employees
    Give them the support and tools they need to be successful. This could include things like a healthy working environment, a supportive team, or the right software or technical equipment.
  • Celebrate the little victories!
    Reward every success, no matter how small it might seem. The goodwill generated will pay you back many times over.
  • Be positive and stay positive
    Don’t lose your cool or lose control, as that will set a bad impression and affect morale.

Identify problems early

You may have people who are having (or causing) problems in your organization. The reasons for this might include issues with their home life, financial problems, or other personal hardships.

In this situation, you must tread carefully and follow all local laws, especially those relating to privacy and employment rights. Seek professional advice if necessary.

Sometimes people just won’t fit into your culture, which is again why making the right employee choice is so important. Firing people should be a last resort if you’ve tried every other option including third-party mediation services and verbal and written warnings. Be sure to follow local legislation if you’re forced to take this option.

Understand negative team dynamics

There are other influences that can prevent a team from becoming successful. These include:

  • Unwillingness to change
    A fixed mindset, for example: “But we’ve always done it this way.”
  • Inability to work together
    Usually due to personality clashes. Resolving these is one of the hardest tasks for management.
  • Too many individual projects
    People who like to excel will feel unmotivated if they have to spread their abilities widely.
  • Too much individual recognition
    Favoring some team members above others will cause resentment.
  • Competing agendas
    If there’s a lack of consensus, productivity will drop.
  • Top-down talk and micro-management
    Saying “Do this, do that” is usually less effective than setting a goal and letting the team achieve it on their own.

Be aware of the potential for these problems to arise, and do what you can to prevent them.

Use your people skills to build your team

For your team to thrive you must be approachable, friendly, authoritative and responsible. In other words, a good manager and leader.

You may need training to help you become a better manager and there’s no shame in that. Running a business is a learning process – and just like your employees, you can learn and improve.

After all, the better you are at managing people, the better your team will perform and the faster your business will grow.

 
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