OutBuro lgbt professional entreprenuer networking online community gay lesbian transgender queer bisexual nonbinary 2

It Can Take Eight Months Before New Starters Become Productive at Work

Employers must ensure their onboarding programs are more effective

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–#Questionmark–Employers are taking too long to get new joiners up to speed. While firms are desperate for new modern skills to deal with the challenges of a shifting business landscape, research shows that it can take between three to eight months for employees to become fully productive.1

Questionmark PrimaryLogo

The new Questionmark report “Getting the Best on Board” explores the importance of a structured onboarding process to setting staff up for success. Team members that receive effective onboarding are 18 times more likely to feel committed to their organization.2 Staff who have a negative onboarding experience are twice as likely to leave.3

Despite the importance of onboarding, the report notes five common challenges that make it difficult to achieve:

  1. Diverse starting points – it is hard for a manager to get a clear read on a person’s previous experience and gaps in their knowledge.
  2. Difficult to measure success – it might take several months for a manager to realize that a new joiner did not learn what they should have during the onboarding process.
  3. Information overload – five to ten departments are often involved in a company’s onboarding process.4 Without structured and prioritized content, a new starter will likely be overwhelmed.
  4. Time restraints – for a manager, taking time out for training and inducting a team member may not feel like a priority. But failing to make it one soon proves a false economy.
  5. Remote onboarding – some 37% of respondents said they had experienced a significant problem with the remote onboarding process.5

John Kleeman, Founder of Questionmark, said: “Assessing the skills of workers before, during and after the onboarding process can give leaders the information they need to check it is working and unlock performance. Assessments show an individual’s starting point, enabling information and training to be tailored and prioritized. Tests during the process indicate whether the information and procedures are being understood. Tests later down the line show whether the information has stuck.”

Managers can use online assessments to check that new workers have understood crucial policies and procedures such as security and health and safety. With information from assessments, employers can make better decisions about a team member’s job readiness.

Read the full report: “Getting the Best on Board: using staff assessments to get new workers on board and up to speed as quickly as possible, with the modern skills to thrive”.

www.questionmark.com

Ends

Notes to editors

About Questionmark

Questionmark unlocks performance through reliable and secure online assessments.

Questionmark provides a secure enterprise-grade assessment platform and professional services to leading organizations around the world, delivered with care and unequalled expertise. Its full-service online assessment tool and professional services help customers to improve their performance and meet their compliance requirements. Questionmark enables organizations to unlock their potential by delivering assessments which are valid, reliable, fair and defensible.

Questionmark offers secure powerful integration with other LMS, LRS and proctoring services making it easy to bring everything together in one place. Questionmark’s cloud-based assessment management platform offers rapid deployment, scalability for high-volume test delivery, 24/7 support, and the peace-of-mind of secure, audited U.S., Australian and European-based data centers.


1 A range of sources indicate a long period of time that it takes to get new starters working at their most productive. Here are two examples: https://hronboard.me/blog/5-ways-to-fast-track-productivity-in-new-starters/

https://www.intuition.com/how-to-maintain-momentum-for-onboarding-programs/

2 https://www.bamboohr.com/resources/infographics/the-incredible-impact-of-effective-onboarding/

3 https://digitate.com/blog/automation-and-ai-superheroes-in-disguise/

4 https://typelane.com/6-reasons-employee-onboarding-is-broken/

5 https://www.clickboarding.com/impact-of-covid-on-employee-onboarding/

Contacts

US: Kristin Bernor, external relations: Kristin.bernor@questionmark.com +1 203.349.6438

UK: Peter Sigrist: peter.sigrist@fourteenforty.uk +44 7720 056 981

Australia and New Zealand: Chelsea Dowd: chelsea.dowd@questionmark.com +61 2 8073 0527

OutBuro lgbt professional entreprenuer networking online community gay lesbian transgender queer bisexual nonbinary 2

Major US Healthcare Labor Shortages Projected in Every State by 2026, Mental Health Professionals Grow in High Demand, Mercer Report Shows

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Even before COVID-19, the US healthcare labor market faced remarkable challenges with the demand for healthcare professionals outpacing supply. As the US continues to grapple with the pandemic, those healthcare professionals will get stretched further. Mercer’s “2021 External Healthcare Labor Market Analysis” released today identifies four key trends impacting the US healthcare labor market over the next five and ten years, and reveals how the healthcare industry needs to adapt to address future labor shortages.

2021 logo

“The healthcare workforce is burned-out following a nearly two-year face-off against COVID-19. The demands placed on healthcare workers since the start of the pandemic have been unrelenting and overall, this data shows that there will not be enough healthcare workers to fill demand in the near future,” said John Derse, Healthcare Industry Leader, Mercer. “This impact will be felt by all of us, regardless of where we live or our field of work.”

The exact deficit depends on the specific role and geography, but a few common themes emerge: the US is losing healthcare professionals to burnout and at a rate faster than expected, a significant portion of physicians plan to retire, and there will be a sharp increase in demand for mental health professionals and low-wage healthcare workers in the near term. Every state is different, and every healthcare system should assess how anticipated projections to their external labor markets will ultimately affect workforce strategies and patient outcomes in the coming years.

1. There will be a shortage of healthcare workers at the low-end of the wage spectrum, which will directly impact access to home care

About 9.7M individuals currently work in critical, albeit lower-wage, healthcare occupations (e.g., medical assistants, home health aides, nursing assistants, etc.). The need for these workers is likely to grow in the coming years, as the aging population will increase demand for healthcare workers while healthcare labor is permanently leaving these occupations. In fact, Mercer’s research shows more than 6.5M individuals will permanently leave this critical workforce in the near future. The result – a substantial shortage of workers in the next five years. New York and California will have the largest labor shortages of this workforce, each projected to fall short by over 500,000 workers by 2026. Only a few states in the country are projected to have surplus labor in low-wage healthcare workers, including Washington, Georgia and South Carolina.

2. Primary care will increasingly be provided by non-physicians

The primary care landscape and how primary care services are delivered is anticipated to change over the next five years as 21% of family medicine, pediatric and OB/GYN, and other primary care physicians will move into retirement age. Yet, demand for primary care physicians will grow by over 4% during the same time period. The result will be a shift towards primary care being provided by physicians’ assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs).

3. There will be significant shortages of nurses in over half of US states, but surplus in some areas of the South and Southwest

Just over 3M individuals work as registered nurses in the US and demand for these professionals will grow by at least 5% over the next five years. With nearly 1M workers expected to permanently leave the profession, over half of US states will not be able to fill demand for nursing talent. The largest projected shortages of nursing talent will be in Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Colorado, Illinois, and Massachusetts. However, in the South and Southwest, new entrants into the local nursing workforce are likely to outpace local demand due to new graduates and historical migration patterns. States like Georgia, Texas and South Carolina may start to build a surplus of registered nurses in the workforce.

4. A hiring rush for mental health providers will emerge by 2026

There will be a 10% increase in demand for mental health workers by 2026. During this time, 400,000 are anticipated to leave the occupation entirely, resulting in twenty-seven states that will be unable to meet hiring demands for skilled and semi-skilled mental health workers. While Massachusetts, Illinois, Pennsylvania, California, and Colorado are expected to have the largest shortages of these professionals, Washington, Texas, Ohio, Florida, and Georgia will each build surplus due to a steady flow of new entrants and that individuals in these regions are leaving mental health occupations at a slower rate than in other states.

“While hospitals and healthcare systems cannot control what’s happening in the external labor market, effective workforce planning and managing internal workforces can help mitigate their exposure to these risks. Workforce strategies that will position an employer for long-term success should focus on transforming care models, rethink compensation and benefits, and introduce more flexibility into staffing, development and rewards,” added Derse. “Prior to the pandemic, the shortages were driven by a healthcare population that was trending older, sicker and more sedentary. Employers should not wait to transform their retention models to accommodate for all demographics in their workforce impacted by the pandemic, particularly ageing skilled professionals considering early retirement.”

Click here to see an interactive map of US healthcare labor projections over five years across six types of healthcare providers.

About the 2021 External Healthcare Labor Market Analysis

Based on Mercer research, publicly available data, and data provided by Emsi, the 2021 External Healthcare Labor Market Analysis examined the changing healthcare labor markets of the next five to ten years in all 50 states at the country, state, regional and national levels. The interactive map here features a small subset of the healthcare workforce at a broad geographic level and insights from Mercer and other Marsh McLennan businesses on the proprietary database of over 80 healthcare roles, projected over 10 years at the county and metropolitan statistical area level. If you’d like to learn more, click here.

About Mercer

Mercer believes in building brighter futures by redefining the world of work, reshaping retirement and investment outcomes, and unlocking real health and well-being. Mercer’s approximately 25,000 employees are based in 43 countries and the firm operates in 130 countries. Mercer is a business of Marsh McLennan (NYSE: MMC), the world’s leading professional services firm in the areas of risk, strategy and people, with 78,000 colleagues and annual revenue of over $18 billion. Through its market-leading businesses including Marsh, Guy Carpenter and Oliver Wyman, Marsh McLennan helps clients navigate an increasingly dynamic and complex environment. For more information, visit mercer.com. Follow Mercer on LinkedIn and Twitter.

About Marsh McLennan

Marsh McLennan (NYSE: MMC) is the world’s leading professional services firm in the areas of risk, strategy and people. The Company’s 78,000 colleagues advise clients in 130 countries. With annual revenue over $18 billion, Marsh McLennan helps clients navigate an increasingly dynamic and complex environment through four market-leading businesses. Marsh provides data-driven risk advisory services and insurance solutions to commercial and consumer clients. Guy Carpenter develops advanced risk, reinsurance and capital strategies that help clients grow profitably and pursue emerging opportunities. Mercer delivers advice and technology-driven solutions that help organizations redefine the world of work, reshape retirement and investment outcomes, and unlock health and well being for a changing workforce. Oliver Wyman serves as a critical strategic, economic and brand advisor to private sector and governmental clients. For more information, visit mmc.com, follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter or subscribe to BRINK.

Contacts

Micaela McPadden
201-694-9719

Micaela.mcpadden@mercer.com

Cybersecurity Skills Crisis Continues for Fifth Year, Perpetuated by Lack of Business Investment

Annual global study from ESG and ISSA reveals not offering competitive compensation as the top factor contributing to the skills shortage for respondents’ organizations

VIENNA, Va.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–#CISOs–The cybersecurity skills crisis continues on a downward, multi-year trend of bad to worse and has impacted more than half (57%) of organizations, as revealed today in the fifth annual global study of cybersecurity professionals by the Information Systems Security Association (ISSA) and industry analyst firm Enterprise Strategy Group (ESG). This annual study seeks to understand the perspectives of the people on the information security career path to help others understand the challenges of this important field.

ISSASecondaryLogosGold6.26.12

The new research report, The Life and Times of Cybersecurity Professionals 2021, surveyed 489 cybersecurity professionals and reveals several nuances surrounding the well-documented cybersecurity skills shortage. The top ramifications of the skills shortage include an increasing workload for the cybersecurity team (62%), unfilled open job requisitions (38%), and high burnout among staff (38%). Further, 95% of respondents state the cybersecurity skills shortage and its associated impacts have not improved over the past few years and 44% say it has only gotten worse.

Notably, the three most-often cited areas of significant cybersecurity skills shortages include cloud computing security, security analysis and investigations, and application security. These areas should be the focus for cybersecurity professionals when looking to develop skills.

The cybersecurity profession remains systemically undervalued

Businesses are not investing in their people in a manner that appropriately reflects the direness of today’s cyberthreat landscape. A striking 59% of respondents said their organization could be doing more to address the cybersecurity skills shortage, with nearly one-third noting that their organization could be doing much more.

  • Cybersecurity professionals need fair and competitive compensation. This came up several times in the research report and is clearly critical to hiring and retaining security personnel. In a new finding this year, not offering competitive compensation is the top factor (38%) contributing to the organizations’ cyber skills shortage because it makes it difficult to recruit and hire the cybersecurity professionals that organizations need. More than three-quarters (76%) of organizations admit that it is difficult to recruit and hire cybersecurity staff, with nearly one-fifth (18%) stating it is extremely difficult. Being offered a higher compensation package is the main reason (33%) CISOs leave one organization for another.
  • Investments in cybersecurity training need to be funded appropriately. When asked what actions organizations could take to address the cybersecurity skills shortage, the biggest response (39%) was an increase in cybersecurity training so candidates can be properly trained for their roles. To maintain and advance their skill sets, many cybersecurity professionals seek to achieve at least 40 hours of training each year. Nearly a quarter (21%) of those surveyed did not meet 40 hours of training per year. The main reason they cited was that their jobs do not pay for 40 hours of training per year and they can’t afford it by themselves, according to nearly half (48%) of respondents.
  • The cybersecurity training paradox continues and needs attention. Nearly all (91%) respondents agree that cybersecurity professionals must keep up with their skills or the organizations they work for are at a significant disadvantage against today’s cyber-adversaries. Despite this need, 59% state that while they try to keep up with cybersecurity skills development, job requirements often get in the way—the paradox that professionals face where they are called upon to make up for the existing skills shortage in addition to falling behind on their own development.
  • Human resources and cybersecurity teams need to align on business value. Nearly one in three (29%) professionals surveyed said the HR departments at their organizations likely exclude strong job candidates because they don’t understand the skills necessary to work in cybersecurity. One in four also said job postings at their organizations tend to be unrealistic, demanding too much experience, too many certifications, or too many specific technical skills. Nearly a third (30%) suggested CISOs try to better educate HR and recruiters on real-world cybersecurity goals and needs and 28% said job recruitments need to be more realistic with the typical levels of experience cybersecurity professionals have.
  • Business and cyber leaders need to work together to improve organizational dynamics. Business executives must embrace cybersecurity as a core component of the business while CISOs need to move their people, processes, and technologies closer to the business. Organizations should be alarmed by the fact that:

    • 29% of respondents said the security team’s relationship with HR is fair or poor.
    • 28% said the relationship with line-of-business managers is fair or poor.
    • 27% of respondents said that the relationship with the board of directors is fair or poor.
    • 24% said the relationship with the legal team is fair or poor.

“There is a lack of understanding between the cyber professional side and the business side of organizations that is exacerbating the cyber skills gap problem,” said Candy Alexander, Board President, ISSA International. “Both sides need to re-evaluate the cybersecurity efforts to align with the organization’s business goals to provide the value that a strong cybersecurity program brings towards achieving the goals of keeping the business running. Cybersecurity leaders should be able to link the security efforts directly to strategic business goals.”

“This report reveals some deep-seated issues with cybersecurity professionals and their organizations,” said Jon Oltsik, Senior Principal Analyst and ESG Fellow. “ESG and ISSA hope that cybersecurity professionals use this research to better understand their profession and peers as they manage their careers. For business and cybersecurity professionals, the data should be seen as a set of guidelines for maximizing cybersecurity investment, improving cybersecurity job satisfaction, and aligning cybersecurity with the business mission. The message is clear: Organizations with a cybersecurity culture are in the best position.”

After reviewing this data, ESG and ISSA recommend that cybersecurity professionals take a holistic approach of continuous cybersecurity education (starting early with public education), comprehensive career development, and career mapping/planning—all with the support and integration with the business.

The full report can be downloaded here.

About ISSA

The Information Systems Security Association (ISSA)™ is the community of choice for international cyber security professionals dedicated to advancing individual growth, managing technology risk, and protecting critical information and infrastructure. ISSA members and award winners include many of the industry’s notable luminaries and represent a broad range of industries – from communications, education, healthcare, manufacturing, financial and consulting to IT – as well as federal, state and local government departments and agencies. Through regional chapter meetings, conferences, networking events and content, members tap into a wealth of shared knowledge and expertise. Follow us on Twitter at @ISSAINTL. Learn more about ISSA.

About ESG

Enterprise Strategy Group (ESG) is an integrated technology analysis, research, and strategy firm providing market intelligence, actionable insight, and go-to-market content services to the global technology community. It is increasingly recognized as one of the world’s leading analyst firms in helping technology vendors make strategic decisions across their go-to-market programs through factual, peer-based research. ESG is a division of TechTarget, Inc. (Nasdaq: TTGT), the global leader in purchase intent-driven marketing and sales services focused on delivering business impact for enterprise technology companies.

Contacts

Leslie Kesselring

Kesselring Communications

leslie@kesscomm.com